Agency Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Mission and Vision

Mission Statement
The Department of Environmental Quality protects and enhances Virginia’s environment, and promotes the health and well being of the citizens of the Commonwealth.
Vision Statement
The Department of Environmental Quality's vision is that Virginians will enjoy: cleaner water available for all uses, improved air quality that supports communities and ecosystems, and the productive re-use of contaminated land.
Agency Values

Executive Progress Report

Service Performance and Productivity
  • Summary of current service performance
    The Department of Environmental Quality touches the lives of all Virginians. To protect and enhance Virginia’s environment, the agency serves every citizen of the Commonwealth, regulates many of our businesses and local governments, and works with individuals and organizations representing all of these interests to develop programs and solve problems in a manner that serves the best interest of the Commonwealth and its natural resources. DEQ fosters an environment of continuous improvement through stakeholder and self assessments.

    DEQ’s vision places a priority on ensuring that all Virginians will enjoy cleaner water available for all uses, improved air quality that supports communities and ecosystems, and the productive re-use of contaminated land.

    DEQ’s strategic plan focuses on outcomes linked to planned initiatives. DEQ’s strategic goals for four key performance areas provide a balanced view of the enterprise as a whole: program capability, community, employees and financial resources.

    The strategic objectives identified in the agency’s strategic plan lay the foundation for DEQ’s service area plans.
  • Summary of current productivity
    The Department of Environmental Quality continually strives to improve efficiency and service delivery and has a history of accommodating increases in workload or new priorities by streamlining our efforts in other areas and reallocating existing resources to meet these new expectations. When DEQ was formed in 1993, it had a maximum employment level of 1091 FTE. During that time, DEQ has implemented several new programs as mandated by EPA or the General Assembly, including the Title V air permit program (106 FTE allocated), the animal and poultry feeding operations program (13 FTE allocated), the nontidal wetlands program (45 FTE allocated), the vehicle emissions inspection program (16 FTE allocated), expansion of water monitoring efforts to meet federal TMDL deadlines (11 FTE allocated), the voluntary remediation and brownfields restoration programs (11 FTE allocated), the biosolids program (20 FTE allocated), and others.

    Recent Budget reduction enacted in 2009 reduced DEQ’s MEL by 61 FTE to 896. The staff reductions include Management and Administration (16); Air compliance (16 FTE); Water permitting (16); Waste permitting and compliance (6 FTE).

    DEQ’s management team works to identify and implement best practices that will allow the agency to more effectively use the funds appropriated to accomplish its mission. DEQ has been able to accomplish this through systemic, formalized efficiency reviews, continuous evaluation of process improvement opportunities, recognition of increasing staff competence and capacity, and implementation of technology-driven efficiency measures. DEQ embraces the concept of continuous improvement and one of the tools DEQ uses for program evaluations is “Lean Six Sigma”. In addition, DEQ performs internal program reviews and audits that assess the efficiency and effectiveness of our programs. These efforts will identify operational changes that will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the agency’s operations and opportunities to reduce the costs of compliance.

    Examples of DEQ productivity initiatives include:

    Risk Based Inspections: Development of a Risk Based Inspection Model that has identified risk factors that have been applied to compliance program inspection strategies to leverage limited resources to accomplish environmental protection goals.

    Workload Analysis: DEQ is undergoing an agency specific Workload Analysis for agency programs. Sound and verifiable workload measures assists DEQ management in a number of critical areas:
    • Productivity Analysis and Improvement: this workload analysis in conjunction with the workflow mapping being done for the agency Enterprise Content Management (ECM) project will highlight areas in a work flow that need attention because of the time demands or delays. With further review DEQ can strive to streamline the work flow.
    • Resource Allocation: with an ever tightening fiscal belt, DEQ needs to be able to distribute workload as effectively as possible. Additionally, with the need to maintain a specified vacancy rate, accurate workload estimates helps facilitate prioritization in filling vacancies.
    • Performance Management: it is important that managers are able to clearly define staff expectations and then fairly and objectively review their performance. This is critical with the advent of telecommuting. Having more universal measures of expected work output is a valuable tool for managers.


    Training: DEQ has a robust training infrastructure that takes advantage of technology and economies of scale to effectively and efficiently manage training resources. In FY09, DEQ leveraged an additional $330,000 worth of training (with no increase in actual cost) by bringing training courses to DEQ facilities and making training available to more employees. Furthermore, through the effective deployment of learning technology, including customized web-based training and off-the-shelf web based training, DEQ staff were able to access 2,000 additional hours of targeted online training in FY09 that was not previously available.


    Technology: DEQ implemented Filenet Enterprise Content Management (ECM) software in 2009 with the plan to include all core agency programs in the system by 2010. The benefits derived from the implementation of ECM at DEQ include:
    • Increased efficiency of staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to copy, reproduce and locate paper documents.
    • Decreased time required for permit generation and increased number of inspections performed annually.
    • Utilizing workflow to enable permit applications to be tracked by the system and help users and managers better prioritize efforts.
    • Increased efficiency of staff by allowing the utilization of forms and functionality to scan data fields into central databases, reducing data entry by staff.
    • Providing a foundation for continuity of operations and telecommuting plans.
    • Allowing the agency to quickly respond to FOIA requests, and provide consistent responses to any inquiries.
    • Allowing the agency to increase the ease with which citizens can access documents.
Initiatives, Rankings and Customer Trends
  • Summary of Major Initiatives and Related Progress
    The quality of Virginia’s air, waters and land depends upon the efforts of Virginia’s businesses, local governments, citizens and state agencies. DEQ continues to work with these partners on several initiatives to improve Virginia’s natural environment.

    DEQ is conducting a study focusing on the collection of monitoring data to ascertain ambient concentrations of toxic air pollutants in Hopewell. The final report will inform future DEQ and SAPCB actions with respect to both the permitting of new sources of toxic air pollutants in the Hopewell area as well as reevaluation of the Commonwealth’s regulatory program for air toxics.

    In October 2008 DEQ, with assistance from Virginia Commonwealth University and contractor ICF, completed the Virginia Mercury Study pursuant to a mandate from the General Assembly. The Virginia Mercury Study analyzed the extent of mercury contamination of Virginia’s waters, the sources of that contamination, as well as the impacts and effects of mercury contamination on Virginia’s citizens. The Virginia Mercury Study will inform future General Assembly, DEQ, and SAPCB actions with respect to the control of mercury emissions in the Commonwealth.

    Pursuant to mandates from the General Assembly in the 2008 and 2009 legislative seasons, DEQ is in the process of developing general permits to regulate air emissions from electric generators that combust biomass, as well as for those that operate only during emergencies or serve only as peak-shaving units. These general permits will provide certainty to the regulated community and speed up the time period within which these generators can become operational, while at the same time assuring they employ state-of-the-art air pollution controls that protect the Commonwealth’s air quality.

    In an effort to protect the public health, DEQ, as part of the governor’s Renew Virginia initiative, has embarked on a long-term program to evaluate air emissions form larger, older facilities to determine whether they result in exceedances of EPA’s health-based National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the immediate areas surrounding those facilities. The pollutants to be examined include SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10. While every evaluation under this program must be conducted on a case-by-case basis due to the unique nature of each facility, it is likely that most will involve air quality modeling, meteorological monitoring, and ambient air monitoring. That data will be gathered at the plant’s expense pursuant to DEQ’s current authority under the State Air Pollution Control Act. Should the data indicate that emissions from a particular facility cause or significantly contribute to an exceedance of the NAAQS then DEQ will work with that company to arrive at a solution that eliminates the exceedance in the most expeditious but cost-effective way possible.

    DEQ continues to provide grant funds from the Virginia Water Quality Improvement Fund to cost-share the construction of nutrient removal facilities at publicly owned wastewater treatment works. These projects aid municipalities to comply with requirements of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed General Permit to achieve assigned nutrient load allocations. The deadline for meeting these annual load caps is 2011. In subsequent years the nutrient removal facilities will assist the localities in maintaining their nutrient load caps even as they treat more wastewater due to population growth. As of July 2009, DEQ has forty-four signed WQIF grant agreements that provide approximately $583 million in grant funds. DEQ is also processing another fifteen grant agreements that, once signed, would provide another $126 million in grant funding assistance.

    DEQ has also continued to effectively administer the Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund which awards low interest long-term loans to localities to improve their wastewater treatment capabilities thereby reducing water pollution. DEQ has worked aggressively to provide substantial funding through the Virginia Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund (VCWRLF) for clean water projects in the areas of wastewater collection and treatment, agricultural best management practices, Brownfields remediation, and land conservation. In collaboration with the Virginia Resources Authority, DEQ has leveraged the Fund to finance almost $1 billion in projects over just the last 4 years. This initiative, in conjunction with the Department’s Water Quality Improvement Fund, has been instrumental in advancing the construction of nutrient removal facilities at wastewater treatment facilities throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In addition, VCWRLF funding has led to considerable progress in the elimination of raw sewage overflows, replacement of outdated wastewater facilities, the conservation of over 8000 acres of land, and the implementation of hundreds of agricultural best management practices throughout the state. The Fund received 80 million in American Recover and Reinvestment Act monies in 2009 and funded 36 important wastewater projects with those funds.

    Through partnership with citizen water quality monitoring organizations, DEQ provides both technical and when available, financial assistance. To date DEQ has received data from nearly 1,000 stations manned by volunteers, representing over 3,600 linear miles of rivers and streams. Citizens are also monitoring several lakes and estuarine areas. Most of these data can be used in the bi-annual Water Quality Assessment Report.

    DEQ's multi-layered water monitoring program has, through strategic use of declining resources, been able to extend monitoring into areas of Virginia never monitored by DEQ before. Out of 1,238 watersheds in Virginia containing perennial waters (streams, rivers, lakes, estuaries, or coastal oceanic watersheds), water quality monitoring data has been collected in 1,217 of them. This monitoring has enabled DEQ to determine that 998 waters to date, previously found to have impaired water quality, now are either partially or fully meeting Water Quality Standards.

    DEQ continues to implement the Groundwater Management Act of 1992 within the coastal plain’s designated groundwater management areas. Given the current regulatory technical criteria and levels of use, it is increasingly unlikely that significant additional groundwater withdrawals can be permitted within large portions of the management area. DEQ has moved forward in implementing several key initiatives in managing groundwater resources including the issuance of two Notices of Intended Regulatory Action to expand the management area to the remainder of the coastal plain and to comprehensively review the current groundwater withdrawal permitting regulation; the contracting of technical services to improve permit review processing times; the completion of a groundwater quality study; and the initiation of two important regional studies of the Potomac and Aquia aquifers.

    DEQ Water Supply Planning staff has continued providing technical assistance to Virginia localities in the development of local and regional water supply plans. This effort has provided statewide training on drought response and contingency planning, demand management, and using collected data in the projection of future water supply needs. As a result of this effort, all local governments in the Commonwealth will have an implementable and enforceable drought response plan that relies on local or regional monitoring of meteorological or natural resource signals.

    DEQ has also developed and implemented cumulative impact analysis modeling for the management of surface water withdrawals. This tool is used to evaluate and establish water withdrawal rules for surface water withdrawals permitted under the Virginia Water Protection Permit Program. The models will also be used to evaluate the future water supply alternatives identified in local and regional water supply plans.

    In the area of land application, DEQ has been effectively implementing the biosolids program, including initiating a regulatory action to improve the biosolids regulations, and ensuring that over 75% of the locations receiving biosolids applications are inspected and compliance with permit conditions assured. We are also in the final stages of a regulatory action to require better tracking and reporting of poultry litter waste from the end users of this fertilizer source, including requirements for the use of nutrient management plans and compliance assurance from these end users.

    DEQ has fully implemented the decentralization of the solid waste permitting program. All permitting functions including the ground water program are being conducted at the regional offices bringing the technical resources of the agency closest to the agency’s regulated community and stakeholders. This ensures timely review of permitting and ground water activities.

    DEQ continues to work on reducing the amount of mercury entering the environment from motor vehicles through its mercury switch program. The primary goal for automobile demolishers is to remove mercury-containing switches from end-of-life vehicles before recycling by the steel industry. To date, approximately 83 pounds of mercury has been diverted from the environment into recovered product.

    DEQ’s brownfields land renewal program has resulted in the cleanup of several contaminated sites. DEQ provides critical incentives and opportunities for business and industry to redevelop properties that are idled or underutilized at which real or perceived environmental issues complicate reuse. Incentives and reduced liabilities offered through this program can make brownfield property development a cheaper option than purchasing and building on undeveloped land. This program is helping to turn once contaminated properties back to productive use. More than $1.25 billion have been reinvested in brownfields, creating thousands of new and part-time jobs, preserving hundreds of greenfield acres, and saving hundreds of existing jobs. In addition, 325 sites have enrolled in the Voluntary Remediation Program.

    In addition to fostering the recycling of almost 98% of the “current flow” of waste tires, the tire recycling fee extension to 2011 has enabled DEQ to plan for the cleanup of all known piles by 2012. Since 2008, major year-long cleanup initiatives ($ 1 million each) have been completed in the Roanoke Region, 90 % completed in Southwestern Virginia and just started in Northern Virginia. To date, 54 piles containing 520,000 tires have been remediated whereas 145 piles with 2.4 million tires remain. On average, 15 new piles are discovered each year. Since 1993, DEQ and property owners have cleaned up 1,127 piles containing 23.5 million tires.

    DEQ is committed to enforcing all of its regulatory programs consistently. During 2009, DEQ staff negotiated, and the State Water Control Board approved, a civil charge of $145,000 against a landowner who impacted rare wetlands. The wetlands, the largest intact sinkhole pond in the Shenandoah Valley, dated back 15,000 years and supported rare plants and invertebrates. The case marked the single largest wetlands penalty ever imposed by the Board.

    DEQ serves as the lead agency for Virginia’s Coastal Zone Management Program – a network of state agencies and Tidewater local governments that administers the Commonwealth’s coastal laws and policies. Several initiatives are underway through this program and will continue through the next reporting period: development of the 5 state Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) which will work on four issues (ocean habitat protection, offshore renewable energy, offshore water quality and climate change adaptation.

    DEQ continues to build capacity for engaging citizens in stewardship actions. Community education efforts have been enhanced through the development of the Environmental Education Leadership program and ten regional networks across the Commonwealth. Both programs, as well as the Virginia Naturally program, work to efficiently and effectively deliver high quality environmental education by “training the trainers” and developing outreach materials about Virginia’s environmental issues. DEQ communicates regularly with nearly 900 state and local partners to coordinate delivery of services. Approximately 1,500 educators across the state are trained each year.

    Through planning, coordination and training, the agency’s community involvement policy is being implemented throughout DEQ regions, programs and practices. Staff resources have been directed to areas with high need such as water supply, Biosolids, nutrient management and regulation development to improve stakeholder understanding and acceptance, and to ensure more participatory approach to problem solving.
  • Summary of Virginia's Ranking
    The DEQ regulatory responsibilities are significant, as Virginia’s 2005 reported toxic chemical releases ranked 20th among states, according to the public data release from EPA. For the period 2005-2007 the Northern Virginia-DC-Maryland region is ranked 14th worst in the nation for ozone. According to the Congressional Research Service report 2007 update, Virginia is ranked second in the amount of municipal solid waste imported, among the 41 states listed. EPA has compiled data regarding leaks from regulated petroleum underground storage tanks. The national case closure rate (site cleanup is complete and the case has been closed) is 79 percent of the reported leaks. Virginia ranks sixth in the nation with a 94 percent case closure rate. Only one state with as many site cleanups as Virginia had a higher rank.


    DEQ and individual staff members have received numerous recognitions for initiative and leadership.

    In 2008 the DEQ Air Division Director received the Bronze Medal for Commendable Service from EPA Region 3 in recognition for his work on the Mirant power plant enforcement action (the Bronze Medal is the highest award that can be bestowed by an EPA region).

    EPA appointed DEQ to the National Environmental Education Advisory Council to represent states’ perspectives. The Council reports to Congress biennially on needs and trends for public and DEQ’s work in capacity building is considered a national model.

    The Virginia Green tourism program, operated by DEQ’s Office of Pollution Prevention, was awarded the Southern Tourism Society’s “Shining Example” award in the fall of 2007.
  • Summary of Customer Trends and Coverage
    Environmental concerns continue to be a large part of everyday life for Virginia’s citizens. A number of observable trends are apparent.

    Air Protection:

    Even as air quality in Virginia has continued to improve, stricter federal standards and regulations are being imposed for air pollution control. As result, DEQ’s efforts to monitor, implement, and enforce these standards and regulations are becoming more challenging. More and smaller sources and activities are becoming subject to controls and restrictions which is a burden for both the regulated community and DEQ compliance efforts.

    Water Protection:

    An ever increasing demand for useable water for industrial, recreational, and residential use, paired with a growing population, continues to strain the available water supply. As a result, the need for water supply planning, as well as treatment of wastewater and pollution control, continues to grow.

    In addition, the health of the Chesapeake Bay, its tributaries and Virginia’s other rivers, streams and lakes is becoming increasingly critical. Pollution discharged into the state’s waterways must be reduced and limited.

    Land Protection:

    Recycling is becoming increasingly important to conserve our land resources. We are focusing more on the waste management hierarchy, which starts with the most preferred method: source reduction, reuse, recycling, resource recovery, incineration, and landfilling. In Virginia, the method of waste management is determined by the locality. Proposed new landfills are a source of controversy for county citizens and environmental groups.
Future Direction, Expectations, and Priorities
  • Summary of Future Direction and Expectations
    Air Protection:

    Virginia has made significant progress in improving air quality in the past several years. Ozone levels in the state have declined to the point where all but one of the five official 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas have come into compliance and been redesignated to attainment. For the remaining nonattainment area in Northern Virginia, an air quality improvement plan has been developed and submitted to EPA to bring the area into compliance. Thus far in 2009, the area is now also monitoring compliance with the ozone standard. All of Virginia is currently monitoring compliance with all the other federal air quality standards, and a plan has been completed and submitted for the Northern Virginia area to continue this improvement and further reduce fine particulate concentrations which had recently exceeded the standard for this pollutant. Visibility in Virginia is also improving and a plan is currently under development to provide for further improvement in visibility that is expected to exceed the federal progress goals by 2018.

    These air quality gains will need to be maintained as new, more stringent federal air quality standards that are on the way. Better air quality means Virginians will have a cleaner environment, improved opportunities for economic development and a healthier way of life.

    Water Protection:

    DEQ is committed to working with our state and federal partners to continue to reduce sources of pollution into the Chesapeake Bay. We are an active participant in the Chesapeake Bay TMDL being conducted by EPA, and will be devoting resources to implementing its requirements when completed.
    .

    Land Protection:

    While the Commonwealth noticed a reduction in solid waste disposal during the past year, DEQ continues to monitor compliance at all regulated waste management facilities while discovering and taking appropriate action on all unpermitted sites.

    Persistent Pollutants:

    As DEQ has studied our natural resources to see what condition they are in, we have found contamination from chemicals like mercury and PCBs across the Commonwealth. DEQ is committed to working with numerous other state and federal agencies to identify the sources of the contamination and working to reduce exposure in the future.

    Enforcement:

    DEQ enforcement will continue to work with EPA as that agency revises its emphasis on enforcement, and in particular enforcement of the program under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).

    Technology:

    As DEQ deploys technologies such as ECM, the agency is laying the foundation for future initiatives that will benefit citizens, the regulated community and other government agencies. Initiatives that DEQ plans to investigate in the future include:

    • Web-based permit application process for the regulated community.
    • Additional web-based reporting systems for the regulated community.
    • Mobilization of the DEQ inspection workforce, with tools to perform multi-media inspections and electronic onsite data capture.
    • Mobilization of the DEQ water quality assessment workforce, with tools to perform onsite data capture and automatic global positioning.
    • Sophisticated environmental data modeling and forecasting tools.
  • Summary of Potential Impediments to Achievement
    Workforce retention:

    DEQ is faced with an aging workforce that includes 294 employees that are eligible to retire. DEQ currently has 76 employees who are eligible to retire with full benefits and an additional 218 employees who are eligible for reduced retirement benefits. The median age of the DEQ workforce is 46 and median number of years of service is 13.7. Turnover and retirement of personnel results in loss of “institutional” knowledge and program history and necessitates a continued commitment to employee training and retention.


    “Complexity” is difficult to explain:

    Complex challenges such as climate change have uncertain thresholds and multiple, far-reaching ramifications. The regulatory, legal, technical and management responsibilities of DEQ are complex and not easily understood by the general public. These activities require years of training and expertise for DEQ staff to accomplish, and by their nature precision and accuracy are essential. For example, fields such as fish tissue analysis, ambient air and water quality analysis, ground water and soil analysis, data submission and analysis all require extensive proficiency to perform. This means it often is difficult for DEQ staff to explain to concerned stakeholders and the general public the significance of the agency's environmental protection efforts. DEQ's challenge is to present highly specialized information in a way that is meaningful and easily understood by the public, to enhance their ability to determine what is useful to them and to participate in environmental decision making. DEQ continues to develop staff training programs that enable technical staff to explain their activities in lay language and to focus on relaying the most important information that meets public needs.

    Communication challenges:

    In addition to the need to explain complex information, DEQ faces other communication challenges. DEQ collects, analyzes and maintains a vast array of environmental data. As information technologies advance, more efficient means of relaying this information to the public are evolving. DEQ is relying on enhanced database management capabilities, coupled with implementation of state-of-the-art Internet accessibility standards, to make environmental data easily available through the agency website. Other communication challenges include keeping communities informed of significant environmental activities of interest to them; coordinating the flow of agency policy, technical and regulatory information to the news media at the local, state and national levels; and ensuring that the actions of DEQ's central office and regional offices are performed and explained to the public on a consistent basis statewide.

    Capacity for partnerships:

    DEQ relies heavily on the assistance and guidance from the agency’s many stakeholders to help solve the complicated issues of environmental protection. For this to be productive, the agency must be able to provide access to environmental data, facilitate collaborative approaches to problem solving, and foster an environment where diverse stakeholders will work together to find solutions. Our ability to meet these needs is limited by the need to improve understanding of environmental protection, the vast amount of information that may be of interest to the different stakeholders, and the information management technology available so that we can provide information to the facilities we regulate and the public in the most efficient manner.

    Funding and technology:

    Other factors affecting services include limited funding for program administration, education and training of staff and the regulated community, and increasing development pressures resulting in increasing work load. Most of the environmental programs have relied on federal funding for a significant portion of support. Funding has not kept up with cost increases, and future federal funding is even more uncertain. DEQ also faces increasing demands in keeping its workforce knowledgeable and familiar with new technology being introduced by business and industry, and subject to regulation.
Service Area List

Service Number Title
440 509 25 Land Protection Permitting
440 509 26 Land Protection Compliance and Enforcement
440 509 27 Land Protection Outreach
440 509 28 Land Protection Planning and Policy
440 512 25 Water Protection Permitting
440 512 26 Water Protection Compliance and Enforcement
440 512 27 Water Protection Outreach
440 512 28 Water Protection Planning and Policy
440 512 29 Water Protection Monitoring and Assessment
440 513 25 Air Protection Permitting
440 513 26 Air Protection Compliance and Enforcement
440 513 27 Air Protection Outreach
440 513 28 Air Protection Planning and Policy
440 513 29 Air Protection Monitoring and Assessment
440 515 02 Financial Assistance for Environmental Resources Management
440 515 03 Virginia Water Facilities Revolving Fund Loans and Grants
440 515 07 Financial Assistance for Coastal Resources Management
440 515 09 Litter Control and Recycling Grants
440 515 10 Virginia Water Quality Improvement Fund
440 515 11 Petroleum Tank Reimbursement
440 599 01 General Management and Direction
440 599 02 Information Technology Services
Agency Background Information

Statutory Authority
Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia establishing the Department of Environmental Quality and establishing its purpose, including the enhancement of public participation, pollution prevention, and public education on environmental protection.

The federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7401 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and provides the principal framework for national, state, and local efforts to protect air quality.

Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 through 99, are the regulations promulgated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Clean Air Act.

The Virginia Air Pollution Control Law [Chapter 13 (§ 10.1-1300 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the State Air Pollution Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for efforts to protect air quality in the Commonwealth.

Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law [Article 22 (§ 46.2 1176 et seq.) of Chapter 10 of Title 46.2 of the Code of Virginia] is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the motor vehicle emissions inspection program, provides the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provides the principal framework for the operation of the program.

Regulations for the Control and Abatement of Air Pollution in Virginia. These regulations, promulgated by the State Air Pollution Control Board to implement the federal Clean Air Act, the Virginia Air Pollution Control Law, and the Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law , provide the specific requirements that regulated sources and citizens are subject to. These regulations set forth the ambient air quality standards and the requirement to operate an air monitoring network to determine compliance with such standards.

For reviewing federal consistency determinations/certifications: Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (16 USC sections 1451-1465); Title 15, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 930 (“Federal Consistency Regulations” implementing the Coastal Zone Management Act, section 307©,

For reviewing electric power generating projects and power line projects in conjunction with the licensing process of the State Corporation Commission: Virginia Code section 56-46.1.
For reviewing oil and gas drilling proposals in the Tidewater region: Virginia Code section 62.1-195.1.
For intergovernmental review - Federal Executive Order 12372

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U. S. C. §§6901 et seq.
RCRA provides the authority to control hazardous waste from origination to elimination. This includes the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous waste. RCRA also sets forth the framework for the management of non-hazardous wastes. RCRA focuses only on active and future facilities and does not address abandoned or historical sites.
Subtitle I authorizes the federal regulation of underground storage tanks.

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90) requires cleanup of oil spills.

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) 42 U. S. C. §§9601 et seq.
CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund, created a tax on chemical and petroleum industries in order to fund responses to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances that may endanger public health or the environment. CERCLA goals are 1) to address cleanup of abandoned and uncontrolled hazardous waste disposal sites, 2) to establish a fund of money financed by an “environmental tax” on corporations; and, 3) to impose liability on private parties who have contributed to a site requiring clean up.

Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 240 through 279, are the regulations promulgated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

The Virginia Waste Management Act (VWMA) [Chapter 14 (§ 10.1-1400 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the Virginia Waste Management Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for efforts to protect the Commonwealth’s lands and ensure wastes are properly managed. The VWMA provides the authority to regulate operations in the Commonwealth involving hazardous and nonhazardous wastes and hazardous materials. The VWMA provides for the development of regulations to site and permit solid, regulated medical waste, and hazardous facilities as well as transport waste upon Virginia's roadways and waterways. The Act also authorizes the development of programs to remediate existing waste sites and return them to productive use. Other programs authorized by the VWMA include pollution prevention, recycling, and the Litter Prevention and Recycling Program and the Waste Tire Management Program.

Coastal Program - Executive Order Twenty-three (2002)
Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (federal legislation). The CZMA provides for development and implementation of state coastal zone management programs under Sections 305, 306/306A, 309, 310; triennial program evaluations under Section 312 and state coastal nonpoint source pollution programs under Section 6217.

The Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. Section 1251 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection agency and provides the principal framework, and minimum requirements, for national and state efforts to protect water quality and water resources.

Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, 40 CFR Sections 40 C.F.R. Parts 100-500 are the regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Clean Water Act.

Title 62.1. Waters of the State, Ports and Harbors. Chapter 2. State Policy as to Waters.

State Water Control Law (Title 62.1, chapters 2, 3.1, 3.2), is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality to protect and manage water quality and water resources in the Commonwealth. Article 4.01, Water Quality Monitoring, Information, and Restoration Act (WQMIRA) requires water quality in Virginia to be monitored and assessed to ensure they support their designated uses including fishing, swimming, and protection of aquatic life.
Article 9 authorizes the DEQ to require cleanups from regulated underground storage tanks in accordance with federal requirements and Article 11 authorizes DEQ to require cleanup for all other types of oil spills including aboveground storage tanks. Article 10 authorizes the DEQ to reimburse storage tank owners for cleanup of petroleum contamination.

Title 62.1. State Waters, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 3.2. Conservation of Water Resources; State Water Control Board establishes the authority for the conservation, planning and utilization of water resources.

Chapter 21.1, Section 10.1-2117, et.seq. of the Code of Virginia – Virginia Water Quality Improvement Act

Title 62.1. State Waters, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 22. Virginia Water Facilities Revolving Fund.
Section 62.1-224 through 62.1-232 of the Code of Virginia established the “Virginia Water Facilities Revolving Fund” as a permanent and perpetual fund to finance clean water projects in Virginia. The Federal Water Quality Act of 1987 first established a State Revolving Fund Capitalization Grant Program at the federal level.

Surface Water Management Act (Title 62.1, chapter 24) is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board to establish surface water management areas and manage surface water resources.

Ground Water Management Act (Title 62.1, chapter 25) is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board to establish ground water management areas and protect ground water resources.

Customers
Customer Group Customers served annually Potential customers annually
Agricultural producers 200 200
Business and industry in Virginia 4,663 5,557
Community organizations 500 9,000
Educational institutions 5 8
Environmental Education teachers 900 80,000
Facilities subject to stationary source air inspection 1,350 4,663
Hazardous waste facilities 400 40,000
Homeowners with leaking heating oil tanks 1,200 250,000
Local governments 300 300
Regulated tank owners 8,000 8,000
Small businesses 10,000 50,000
Solid waste facilities 348 5,000
Students 1,000 1,100,000
Vehicle owners subject to emissions inspections 745,466 1,750,000
Voluntary remediation program participants 248 5,000
VPDES permitees (general) 3,500 3,500
VPDES permitees (individual) 1,400 1,400
Waste tire pile property owners 25 305

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
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Partners
Partner Description
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Products and Services
  • Description of the Agency's Products and/or Services:
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  • Factors Impacting Agency Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes in Products or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
Finance
  • Financial Overview:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown:
    FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $45,916,956  $177,659,797     $42,966,956  $176,909,797 
    Change To Base    $0  $0     $0  $0 
               
    Agency Total $45,916,956  $177,659,797     $42,966,956  $176,909,797 
    This financial summary is computed from information entered in the service area plans.
Human Resources
  • Overview
    As of July 1, 2009, the Department of Environmental Quality has an authorized FTE level of 896. We currently have 782 full-time employees. Approximately 270 employees work in DEQ’s central office located at 629 East Main Street in Richmond, Virginia. The remaining employees work in seven regional offices in Roanoke, Richmond, Abingdon, Harrisonburg, Woodbridge, Virginia Beach, and Lynchburg. Of the 896 positions, approximately 12.7% of the positions are classified as Management; 74.4% of the positions are classified in technical roles including the roles of Environmental Specialist I and II, and the remaining 12.9% of the positions are in policy, planning, outreach and administrative roles.

    DEQ faces workforce challenges related to workforce recruitment and retention due to an increasing number of employee’s who are eligible to retire and the loss of staff to the federal and local governments and private industry firms that offer salary ranges much greater than DEQ can offer. Through the strategic planning process, DEQ has developed strategic objectives for workforce development to address agency recruitment and retention.
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date 7/1/2009    
    Total Authorized Position level 896    
    Vacant Positions -114    
    Current Employment Level 782.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled) 1    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled) 781    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled) 0    
    Faculty (Filled) 0    
    Wage 40    
    Contract Employees 2    
    Total Human Resource Level 824.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    DEQ’s balanced approach to strategic planning identifies “Employees” as a Key Performance Area with focused efforts towards developing an outcome oriented workforce and culture. Agency efforts in this area are designed to attract and retain highly qualified staff and to properly prepare the agency’s future leaders. One objective identified in the performance area is to fully implement an organization development program. DEQ is faced with an aging workforce that includes 294 employees that are eligible to retire. We currently have 76 employees who are eligible to retire with full benefits and an additional 218 employees who are eligible for reduced retirement benefits. The median age of the DEQ workforce is 46 and median number of years of service is 13.7. Through our career path approach we will be able to identify future supervisors and allow an avenue for employees to progress in their technical career and enable the Agency to retain staff with the knowledge and skills necessary to meet agency commitments. DEQ’s career path program will also help the Agency to recruit for knowledge skills and ability (KSA) gaps within a designated program.
    DEQ seeks to continually enhance our program and has recently developed these strategies:

    Implementing a workforce development program:


    DEQ is planning for workforce development through several key initiatives designed to build internal leadership capability. Through these initiatives DEQ is ensuring continuity of leadership in the future, and is preventing the loss of organizational and programmatic knowledge. The agency is building on the success of the “career path” program, which was implemented in 2005, to expand this initiative into Career Path – Phase III. This phase will focus on identifying, developing, and supporting leadership talent in the agency. Over the next Biennium, DEQ will identify core leadership competencies, map staff level of leadership competence, and create opportunities for staff to strengthen their leadership skills, knowledge and abilities. DEQ is further investing in workforce development by sending management staff to the Virginia Executive Institute (VEI), and the Commonwealth Management Institute (CMI). Since 2008, 18 managers have attended these highly rated management development programs. DEQ’s workforce development strategy also includes a learning partnership agreement with Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). In 2007, DEQ and VCU began offering a Master’s of Environmental Studies degree to staff via distance learning. In 2009, this program had 13 participants. The Master’s program is developing cross-media environmental technical expertise, and is preparing the next generation of DEQ environmental leaders.



    Continued Training Initiatives:

    DEQ is committed to training and developing employees to enable them to better meet the agency’s mission. Through a structured training program tied to the Agency’s performance management process, DEQ will continue to enhance employee’s environmental technical skills and will continue to develop and implement programs that will assist the agency to retain corporate knowledge and ensure continuity of leadership.
    .

    Enhancing reward and recognition effort:

    DEQ continues to use the Career Path progression as a tool to reward and recognize staff that has learned additional skills and/or knowledge during the performance evaluation and EWP cycle. We continue to recognize and reward extra efforts from our valued employees on a quarterly basis as well as our instant awards and DEQ’s annual awards.

    Revision of EWPs to promote strategic results:

    DEQ continues to incorporate strategic results into employee EWPs, which enables management to measure an employee’s performance throughout the performance cycle. We award employees who were rated extraordinary during the performance cycle with 16 hours of recognition leave


    Enhanced telecommuting program/alternative work schedule:

    DEQ has seven regional offices located throughout the Commonwealth and utilizes telecommuting whenever possible. The agency is committed to reaching and sustaining the Governor’s goal of having 20% of the workforce telecommuting. The agency revised and published a Telecommuting policy that provided additional opportunities for employees to telecommute on a long-term or short-term basis. Statewide training was provided to all employees and managers in regards to the policy and program changes.

    Several staff members currently report to one regional office but physically work at another. This not only provides the employee with a benefit of working closer to their home, but in some instances saves the agency money on office expenses. Many staff members are now able to work from their homes up to 4 days a week and visit the office on a routine or scheduled basis.

    Recent data indicates the following:

    • Positions Eligible to Telecommute - 97%
    • Long-Term Telecommuters – 30.59% (238 employees)
    • Short-Term Telecommuters – 103 employees

    As part of the revised Telecommuting program, Long-Term Telecommuters are provided laptops and VPN software to complete their work.

    In addition to allowing employees to telecommute, employees are also offered the opportunity to work an Alternate Work Schedule (AWS). Currently, 252 employees work an alternate work schedule that consists of one of the following three options:

    • 4 - Ten Hour Days
    • 4 - Nine Hour Days and 4 Four Hours Day
    • 1 - 44 Hour Workweek and 1 36 Hour Workweek with one day off every two weeks

    Both of these practices allow the agency to provide a flexible work environment for current staff and are useful in attracting and retaining potential employees.
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    With an aging workforce it’s imperative to retain current staff and to continue to promote career opportunities through our career path program to ensure knowledge transfer. DEQ will continue to offer training to ensure employee’s skills and knowledge are kept current. The average turnover rate for State government is 9.8% compared to DEQ’s turnover rate of 6.3%. This indicates that DEQ’s organizational development strategies to address on-going turnover challenges may be working. DEQ will strive to continue these efforts and identify new ways of attracting and retaining our highly motivated and skilled workforce.
Information Technology
  • Current Operational IT Investments:
    DEQ is an information-driven organization. The dynamic nature of environmental regulation requires ever-increasing environmental data for analysis and decision-making, and thus requires a continued effort towards more efficient methods for capturing, storing, protecting, and exchanging data. To this end DEQ has made progress with several technology-based initiatives:

    Software Upgrades – DEQ continues to upgrade all of its environmental databases and applications, in order to ensure that the software is current, supportable and includes the latest security patches. DEQ is currently converting the legacy Oracle Forms and Reports application for the Agency’s Comprehensive Data System (CEDS) to an n-tier architecture that will ensure that the CEDS application will more easily allow data communication with DEQ’s other applications and the Web.

    Infrastructure Upgrades – DEQ is an active participant in the VITA and Northrop Grumman Partnership’s effort to transform the state’s IT infrastructure. DEQ servers have been upgraded and relocated to the new VITA Data Center in Chesterfield; DEQ has transformed to the Commonwealth of Virginia (COV) network; inventory has been completed and the desktop environment refreshed; DEQ has transitioned helpdesk support to VITA/NG. DEQ is currently working with VITA/NG to complete transformations for messaging, re-IP, e-Support, and VPN.

    Document Management / Enterprise Content Management (ECM) – DEQ implemented Filenet ECM software in 2009 with the plan to include all core agency programs in the system by 2010 and to continue to provide improvements to the system. The efficiencies expected for DEQ through ECM include:
    increase efficiency of staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to copy, reproduce, and locate paper documents
    electronic workflow process to enable permit applications to be tracked by the system and help users and managers better prioritize efforts
    increase efficiency of staff by allowing the utilization of forms and functionality that will allow data fields to be scanned into its central databases reducing data entry by staff
    provide a foundation for a Continuity of Operations and telecommuting plans
    allow the agency to quickly respond to FOIA requests, and provide consistent responses to any inquiries
    allow the agency to increase the ease in which citizens can access documents
    reduces leased rental space due to elimination of paper files

    E-Transactions – DEQ will establish an internet-based process for the public to register and submit documents. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    increases the efficiency of the staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to receive and begin processing documents
    enable DEQ to improve services to citizens

    Node – DEQ has deployed a Node system, which provides for automated, electronic exchanges of consistently formatted environmental data between DEQ, EPA, and other stakeholders such as the Chesapeake Bay Program and other state agencies.

    EDMR – DEQ deployed an Electronic Discharge Monitoring Report (EDMR) system for VPDES individual permit holders. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    allow the regulated community to file electronic reports with DEQ via the web
    improve effectiveness of DEQ staff and the regulated community by providing faster response for data analyses, compliance assessment, and decision-making

    SWIA – DEQ deployed a Solid Waste Information and Assessment (SWIA) system. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    allow the regulated community to file electronic reports with DEQ via the web
    improve effectiveness of DEQ staff and the regulated community by providing faster response for data analyses and decision-making

    CEDS Reporting – DEQ has taken initial steps toward more efficient retrieval of data from its environmental system of record, CEDS. The agency has completed a needs assessment. DEQ has a long-term goal of deploying Business Intelligence technology and a data warehouse. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    increase efficiency of staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to compile and analyze data
    allow the agency to quickly respond to FOIA requests, and provide consistent responses to any inquiries
    allow the agency to increase the ease in which citizens can access information

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – DEQ will continue to upgrade the agency’s overall GIS environment, including hardware, applications, and databases. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    increase efficiency of staff by significantly reducing paper-based tracking methods
    increase web-based sharing of data with citizens and regulated community
    provide a decision support system to improve the efficiency of permitting and compliance

    Oracle E-Business Suite (EBiz) - DEQ continues to upgrade the EBiz application and database in order to ensure that the software is current, supportable and includes the latest security patches. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    improve interoperability with other state systems
    increase efficiency of staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to process and analyze EBiz data

    Air Quality Monitoring (AQM) – DEQ will replace its present AQM system, which was purchased in 1987, with a state-of-the-art COTS system. The business drivers that support the investment in this technology for DEQ include:
    meeting increasingly stringent EPA air monitoring requirements
    improve data collection techniques, which provide improved data quality
    increase the timeliness of the data
    increase efficiency of staff by significantly reducing the time necessary to process and analyze air quality data

    Telecommuting – DEQ will continue to work to deploy technologies, polices, and procedures to support telecommuting in order to:
    reduce costs associated with office space
    increase job satisfaction and improve staff retention and recruiting
    reduce automobile emissions, resulting in cleaner air for the Commonwealth

    As DEQ deploys technologies such as ECM, Business Intelligence, and GIS, the agency is laying the foundation for future initiatives that will benefit citizens, the regulated community and other government agencies. Initiatives that DEQ plans to investigate in the future include:

    web-based permit application process for the regulated community
    additional web-based reporting systems for the regulated community
    mobilization of the DEQ inspection workforce, with tools to perform multi-media inspections and electronic on-site data capture
    mobilization of the DEQ water quality assessment workforce, with tools to perform on-site data capture and automatic Global Positioning
    mobilization of DEQ “emergency first responders” with tools to display GIS visuals and perform on-site data capture and automatic Global Positioning
    sophisticated environmental data modeling and forecasting tools
  • Factors Impacting the Current IT:
    Funding is the most critical component for successful IT enhancements and sustainability. Many projects including Web based e-document enhancements carry long-term cost benefits, but require one-time funding in one fiscal year and continuous financial support for maintenance in succeeding years.

    EPA is replacing many legacy systems with an integrated compliance Information System (ICIS). This will require DEQ to update current business processes and IT systems to accommodate the new system requirements.

    New and changing environmental regulations require enhancements to existing systems and/or the creation of new systems.
  • Proposed IT Solutions:
    DEQ is an information-driven organization. The dynamic nature of environmental regulation requires ever-increasing environmental data for analysis and decision-making, and thus requires a continued effort towards more efficient methods for capturing, storing, protecting, and exchanging data.
  • Current IT Services:

    Estimated Ongoing Operations and Maintenance Costs for Existing IT Investments

    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Projected Service Fees $3,450,047 $167,478 $3,501,798 $169,991
    Changes (+/-) to VITA
    Infrastructure
    $84,530 -$605,290 $84,530 -$605,290
    Estimated VITA Infrastructure $3,534,577 -$437,812 $3,586,328 -$435,299
    Specialized Infrastructure $0 $0 $0 $0
    Agency IT Staff $1,729,668 $46,828 $1,729,668 $46,828
    Non-agency IT Staff $150,000 $0 $150,000 $0
    Other Application Costs $221,863 $0 $221,863 $0
    Agency IT Current Services $5,636,108 -$390,984 $5,687,859 -$388,471
    Comments:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Proposed IT Investments

    Estimated Costs for Projects and New IT Investments

    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Major IT Projects $0 $0 $0 $0
    Non-major IT Projects $0 $0 $0 $0
    Agency-level IT Projects $0 $0 $0 $0
    Major Stand Alone IT Procurements $0 $0 $0 $0
    Non-major Stand Alone IT Procurements $0 $0 $0 $0
    Total Proposed IT Investments $0 $0 $0 $0
  • Projected Total IT Budget
    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Current IT Services $5,636,108 -$390,984 $5,687,859 -$388,471
    Proposed IT Investments $0 $0 $0 $0
    Total $5,636,108 -$390,984 $5,687,859 -$388,471
Appendix A - Agency's information technology investment detail maintained in VITA's ProSight system.
Capital
  • Current State of Capital Investments:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Factors Impacting Capital Investments:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Capital Investments Alignment:
    [Nothing entered]
Agency Goals

Goal 1

Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards

Goal Summary and Alignment

This agency goal is aimed toward the same outcomes identified in Virginia’s long-term objective to be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy. Meeting or exceeding environmental standards will enable Virginia to compete for new business and industrial opportunities. Protection of our environmental resources will enable those resources to be utilized for the best economic benefit. Because withholding of federal highway trust funds can be a sanction imposed for nonattainment of air quality standards, this agency goal also is aligned with the long-term objective to ensure that Virginia has a transportation system that is safe, enables easy movement of people and goods, enhances the economy and improves our quality of life. Finally, this agency goal most directly relates to the long-term objective to protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
  • Ensure that Virginia has a transportation system that is safe, enables easy movement of people and goods, enhances the economy and improves our quality of life.
Goal 2

Foster an informed and engaged community

Goal Summary and Alignment

DEQ recognizes the value of involving people in matters relating to their environment. Knowledge and awareness, enhanced through education and public outreach, will promote sound government and decision-making. This agency goal thus is directly aligned with Virginia’s long-term objectives to elevate the levels of educational preparedness and attainment of our citizens, to engage and inform citizens to ensure we serve their interests, and to inspire and support Virginians toward healthy lives and strong and resilient families.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Elevate the levels of educational preparedness and attainment of our citizens.
  • Engage and inform citizens to ensure we serve their interests.
  • Inspire and support Virginians toward healthy lives and strong and resilient families.
Goal 3

Achieve an optimal use of current and new resources

Goal Summary and Alignment

This agency goal shares the same focus with Virginia’s long-term objective to be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation. In addition, efficient use of our resources will enable DEQ to optimally protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation.
  • Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Goal 4

Sustain an outcome oriented workforce and culture

Goal Summary and Alignment

This agency goal shares the same focus with Virginia’s long-term objective to be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation. In addition, an engaged and motivated workforce will enhance DEQ’s ability to protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation.
  • Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Goal 5

We will strengthen the culture of preparedness across state agencies, their employees and customers.

Goal Summary and Alignment

This goal ensures compliance with federal and state regulations, polices and procedures for Commonwealth preparedness, as well as guidelines promulgated by the Assistant to the Governor for Commonwealth Preparedness, in collaboration with the Governor’s Cabinet, the Commonwealth Preparedness Working Group, the Department of Planning and Budget and the Council on Virginia’s Future. The goal supports achievement of the Commonwealth’s statewide goal of protecting the public's safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.

Goal Objectives
  • We will be prepared to act in the interest of the citizens of the Commonwealth and its infrastructure during emergency situations by actively planning and training both as an agency and as individuals.
    Objective Strategies
    • The agency Emergency Coordination Officer will stay in continuous communication with the Office of Commonwealth Preparedness and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked

Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 1 of 22
Land Protection Permitting (440 509 25)
Description

DEQ issues permits and approvals to facilities that manage solid and hazardous waste. The permits contain requirements for the design, operation and proper closure of a facility upon cessation of regulated activities. The permits also define the appropriate corrective action and measures to be undertaken should pollutants escape into the environment. The goal of developing and implementing a closure plan is to prevent such pollution from reaching the land and groundwater. Remediation plans address the cleanup of any known or future releases. Waste permits are required for transportation, treatment, storage, disposal, and incineration of hazardous and solid waste.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    DEQ works with EPA and facilities to manage waste effectively and to cleanup waste releases. This protects and enhances Virginia’s environment, and promotes the health and well being of the citizens of the Commonwealth.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U. S. C. §§6901 et seq.
    RCRA provides the authority to control hazardous waste from the generation to the elimination. This includes the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous waste. RCRA also sets forth the framework for the management of non-hazardous wastes. RCRA focuses only on active and future facilities and does not address abandoned or historical sites. CERCLA addresses those types of sites.

    Virginia Waste Management Act (VWMA), Va. Code §§10.1-1400 et seq.
    The VWMA provides the authority to regulate operations in the Commonwealth involving hazardous and nonhazardous wastes and hazardous materials. The VWMA provides for the development of regulations to site and permit solid, regulated medical waste, and hazardous facilities as well as transport waste upon Virginia's roadways and waterways. The Act also authorizes the development of programs to remediate existing waste sites and return them to productive use. Other programs authorized by the VWMA include pollution prevention, recycling, and litter control.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Hazardous waste facilities 330 40,000
Solid waste facilities 348 5,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
Anticipated changes in hazardous waste include an additional 158 facilities, due to facilities fluctuating their services among large and small quantity generators. The number of solid waste facilities is expected to increase, as potential sites are identified and addressed.
Partners
Partner Description
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is a partner with DEQ at hazardous waste facilities, in issuing permits and determining remediation goals. DEQ is in the lead at permitted facilities. EPA is in the lead at non-permitted facilities that need corrective action.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • DEQ provides a service via the review and approval of the permit applications and corrective action plans developed to cleanup waste releases.
    • DEQ’s product is the waste permit, including operational requirements, closure plans, and corrective action plans.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Land Protection Permitting comes from federal funds (26%), general funds (29%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (45%), primarily from solid waste and hazardous waste permit fees. Federal funds are only provided for hazardous waste activity, and require matching funds that are provided by the hazardous waste permit fees and general funds. General funds and solid waste fee revenues constitute the solid waste permitting support.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
    Base Budget $1,238,123 $3,098,969    $1,238,123 $3,098,969
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,238,123  $3,098,969     $1,238,123  $3,098,969 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Timely processing of accurate, effective, and defensible permits that are environmentally protective.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Amend permits with closure plans, using the Old Unlined Landfill Closure spreadsheet.
    • Implement the Hazardous Waste Corrective Action workplan.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of old, unlined permitted sanitary landfills closed
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      7
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (FY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      14
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: The number of facilities listed on DEQ's Old Unlined Sanitary Landfill database is compared to the baseline (FY 2005).

    • Number of sites where human exposures to hazardous waste releases are determined to be under control
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Federal Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      60
      Date:
      9/30/2008

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (Federal Fiscal Year 2008

      Measure Target Value:
      110
      Date:
      9/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (Federal Fiscal Year 2012)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      122
      Date:
      9/30/2020

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Number (Federal Fiscal Year 2020)

      Data Source and Calculation: Cumulative total of sites as reported in the EPA hazardous waste database (RCRAInfo) for each fiscal year is compared to the baseline (FFY 2008).



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 2 of 22
Land Protection Compliance and Enforcement (440 509 26)
Description

DEQ works with EPA and facilities to manage waste effectively and to cleanup waste releases. DEQ inspects facilities that manage solid and hazardous waste. The regional solid and hazardous waste compliance staff conducts field inspections to verify adherence to permit requirements and regulations, reviews and tracks self-reporting data from facilities, and provides technical guidance to the regulated community. DEQ conducts appropriate enforcement actions in response to the continued failure or unwillingness of regulated entities to comply with federal and state regulatory requirements regarding waste management. Enforcement activities include: compelling compliance and remediation through agreements or administrative orders; imposing penalties when appropriate to recover costs, to remove the economic benefit of noncompliance, and to deter future violations; identifying and responding to criminal violations; establishing comprehensive and consistent enforcement policies to ensure that all parties receive similar treatment for similar violations; providing assistance in cases referred to the Office of the Attorney General; coordinating with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; assisting other federal and state agencies as necessary; and providing advice to representatives of the regulated community and other departments of DEQ regarding regulatory interpretations.

Traditionally, enforcement efforts have supported the permitting programs by ensuring that permit conditions are followed and that permitted facilities can compete on an equal basis with other entities in the marketplace. Enforcement has also sought to eliminate unpermitted activities either by terminating those activities or requiring them to obtain a permit, remediating any environmental damage that may have been done, and deterring future violations by eliminating the economic benefits of noncompliance.
Enforcement activities have generally been undertaken in the following areas: all waste permit programs, including hazardous, solid and regulated medical wastes; open dumps; and other, unpermitted, waste disposal activities.

DEQ’s waste remediation staff review remediation plans to clean up contaminated sites. The Federal Facilities Restoration Program remediates sites at Department of Defense and Defense Logistics Agency installations. Private sites on the National Priority List are remediated under the Superfund Program. DEQ’s Brownfield Program issues letters acknowledging owners are protected from environmental liability. DEQ’s Voluntary Remediation Program issues certificates of satisfactory completion to owners who cleanup their property that they are not mandated to remediate, thus removing the environmental concerns and releasing the property for resale.

The Pollution Investigation and Response activity is responsible for ensuring that the Agency appropriately assesses and responds to all pollution reports it receives, and for conducting DEQ planning and coordination necessary to ensure that the Agency meets its responsibilities in the event of an environmental emergency. The Virginia Environmental Emergency Response Fund is utilized for investigation and response to nonpetroleum contamination when the responsible party is unknown or unwilling.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Through efforts in this service area, land is cleaned up, that otherwise would not be remediated, green space is preserved and blighted sites are put back into productive use.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U. S. C. §§6901 et seq.
    RCRA provides the authority to control hazardous waste from generation to elimination. This includes the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous waste. RCRA also sets forth the framework for the management of non-hazardous wastes. RCRA focuses only on active and future facilities and does not address abandoned or historical sites. CERCLA addresses those types of sites.

    Virginia Waste Management Act (VWMA), Va. Code §§10.1-1400 et seq.
    The VWMA provides the authority to regulate operations in the Commonwealth involving hazardous and nonhazardous wastes and hazardous materials. The VWMA provides for the development of regulations to site and permit solid, regulated medical waste, and hazardous facilities as well as transport waste upon Virginia's roadways and waterways. The Act also authorizes the development of programs to remediate existing waste sites and return them to productive use. Other programs authorized by the VWMA include pollution prevention, recycling, and litter control.

    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) 42 U. S. C. §§9601 et seq.
    CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund, created a tax on chemical and petroleum industries in order to fund responses to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances that may endanger public health or the environment. CERCLA goals are 1) to address cleanup of abandoned and uncontrolled hazardous waste disposal sites, 2) to establish a fund of money financed by an “environmental tax” on corporations; and, 3) to impose liability on private parties who have contributed to a site requiring clean up.

    The Virginia Environmental Emergency Response Fund (VEERF), Code of Virginia Title 01.1, Chapter 25.
    VEERF is used to address nonpetroleum environmental emergencies where the responsible party is unknown or unwilling. The Department of Environmental Quality seeks cost recovery when this fund is used and the responsible party is known.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Brownfields Redevelopment Program 40 5,000
Federal Facillities Restoration Program 48 48
Hazardous Waste Facilities 330 40,000
Solid Waste Facilities 348 5,000
Superfund Program 19 19
Voluntary Remediation Program 248 5,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
Hazardous waste facilities are expected to increase by 158 during 2005, due to facilities fluctuating between serving large and small quantity generators. The number of solid waste facilities is expected to increase, as potential sites are identified and addressed. The number of Brownfields and Voluntary Remediation Program facilities is expected to increase as the programs grow. The numbers of Federal Facilities and Superfund sites are expected to decrease, as sites are remediated.
Partners
Partner Description
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Defense (DOD) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) are partners with DEQ in waste remediation programs, through a formal process called Partnering, where teams decide the best remediation approach at a site. DOD is in the lead at Federal Facilities Restoration sites. EPA is in the lead at Superfund sites. DEQ is in the lead at Voluntary Remediation sites and Brownfield Redevelopment sites.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • The service is the review of facility operations and data. The product is the waste inspection report, indicating whether the facility is in compliance with requirements. In addition to the report, if the facility is non-compliant, the product is a warning letter or notice of violation. The service is the review and approval of the eligibility application and remediation plans developed to cleanup the sites. The products are letters acknowledging owners are protected from environmental liability and certificates of satisfactory completion to owners who cleanup their property.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Land Protection Compliance and Enforcement comes from federal funds (47%), general funds (30%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (23%) including revenues from solid waste and hazardous waste permit fees, Virginia Environmental Emergency Response Fund, Waste Tire Trust Fund, and other special revenues. Federal funds are not available for solid waste management. Most of the federal funds require state matching funds.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
    Base Budget $1,906,239 $4,441,108    $1,906,239 $4,441,108
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,906,239  $4,441,108     $1,906,239  $4,441,108 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Achieve certain, consistent, timely compliance and enforcement.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • DEQ facilitates the cleanup of contaminated property.
    • Link solid and hazardous waste compliance program to risk based strategy focusing on the facilities which pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. Small handlers of hazardous waste (known as Small Quantity Generators (SQG)) constitute an elevated level of risk to human health and the environment due to their potential lack of resources to adequately understand and ensure compliance
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of acres of land certified complete through the Voluntary Remediation Program
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      1979
      Date:
      12/31/2004

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (CY 2004)

      Measure Target Value:
      3117
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (CY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: The cumulative totals are obtained from the Voluntary Remediation Program database maintained in the office, and compared to the baseline (calendar year 2004).

    • Cumulative number of full compliance evaluation inspections of Small Quantiy Generators
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Federal Fiscal Year (FFY)

      Measure Baseline Value:
      257
      Date:
      9/30/2008

      Measure Baseline Description: Federal Fiscal Year (FFY 2008)

      Measure Target Value:
      1100
      Date:
      9/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Federal Fiscal Year (FFY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Data related to the number of inspections is obtained from the US EPA federal database known as RCRAInfo.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 3 of 22
Land Protection Outreach (440 509 27)
Description

The land protection outreach service area involves providing information, training, technical assistance, and support to citizens, community groups, local governments, regulated facilities, and teachers about the overall waste management and land protection programs in the Commonwealth.

DEQ works with educational organizations, business and industry, local governments, schools, interested citizens, and other organizations to inform people about environmental protection and programs. DEQ also provides technical assistance to regulated entities to help assure compliance with environmental statutes and regulations.

DEQ’s primary outreach programs include: Environmental Education, Public Affairs, Litter Prevention and Recycling, Waste Tires, Pollution Prevention, and Coastal Zone Management. The Environmental Education Program provides training for community educators and classroom teachers, supports a network of volunteers and community based organizations, and promotes community involvement. The Public Affairs Program provides information to citizens and the media, maintains the agency’s website, and responds to citizen inquiries. The Litter Prevention and Recycling Program provides educational, informational, and promotional support for efforts to eliminate litter and to encourage recycling in the Commonwealth. The Waste Tire Program provides support for the development of on-going waste tire management systems for localities, for end use markets for Virginia waste tire material, and for the elimination and/or clean up of illegal waste tire piles in the Commonwealth. The Pollution Prevention Program provides non-regulatory, voluntary pollution prevention assessments, training, workshops, research and information. Implementation of Virginia’s Environmental Excellence Program includes a mentoring program, and financial and regulatory incentives to participating facilities.

The Virginia Coastal Management Program receives annual funding from NOAA under the federal Coastal Zone Management Act to implement and improve Virginia’s laws and policies that affect coastal resources within the defined coastal zone. This zone includes all cities, counties and towns that touch on tidal waters. The program has a staff of 6 FTEs and is guided by a 25 member interagency Coastal Policy Team. DEQ serves as the lead agency for this networked program of state agencies and local governments. By virtue of having a federally approved coastal zone management program, Virginia has the authority to require that federal actions be consistent with the state’s enforceable, incorporated coastal laws. DEQ's Environmental Impact Review Program coordinates the Commonwealth's review of Environmental Impact Reports for major state projects, federal documents developed pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act, permits for construction or expansion of public airports or runways, permits to drill for oil or gas in Tidewater, environmental documents addressing the exploration for and extraction of minerals on state-owned lands, and other federal intergovernmental reviews. DEQ reviews federal actions (direct, indirect, and federally funded) which affect Virginia's Coastal Zone to ensure consistency with the Virginia Coastal Program.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Environmental Education and outreach programs help people understand the way the natural world works and how people influence and are influenced by their environment. It includes understanding how people, individually and collectively, can make responsible and informed decisions about their own behaviors and can act voluntarily to conserve or protect natural resources. It helps to ensure that the citizens we serve have access to information and have a better understanding of the programs implemented by DEQ. It improves the information provided for the agency’s use in making environmental protection decisions, which results in better decisions. This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by providing the information, technical assistance and understanding needed to meet or exceed environmental protection goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia establishing the Department of Environmental Quality and establishing its purpose, including the enhancement of public participation, pollution prevention, and public education on environmental protection.

    The Virginia Waste Management Act [Chapter 14 (§ 10.1-1400 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia,] establishing the Virginia Waste Management Board and the Commonwealth’s policies and programs for waste management and land protection, including the Litter Prevention and Recycling Program and the Waste Tire Management Program.

    Coastal Program - Executive Order Twenty-three (2002)
    Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (federal legislation). The CZMA provides for development and implementation of state coastal zone management programs under Sections 305, 306/306A, 309, 310; triennial program evaluations under Section 312 and state coastal nonpoint source pollution programs under Section 6217.

    The Waste Tire Recycling Fee was established in §58.1-642 of the Code of Virginia (1989, 2003) while the Waste Tire program was authorized in §10.1-1422.3 and -1422.4 of the Code of Virginia .

    Litter Prevention and Recycling - The Litter Control and Recycling were created by §10.1-1422.01 thru -1422.05 of the Code of Virginia.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Community Organizations 500 9,000
Localities 314 325

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
[Nothing entered]
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Services: 1. Information to citizens, the media and other organizations through correspondence, media releases, the agency web-site and other venues 2. Technical Assistance to agencies, grantees and other customers (e.g. coordinating meetings, providing information, conducting conferences, initiating new programs) 3. Financial Assistance to grantees (e.g. funding positions, supplies, travel, etc) 4. Training and work-shops to support teachers, local governments and community organizations
    • Products: 1. Educational products: magazine, brochures, website, exhibits 2. Research products: reports, data, maps, interactive mapping sites & other online resources, management tools
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Land Protection Outreach comes from federal funds (3%), general funds (12%), and revenues from nongeneral fund sources (85%), most significantly the waste tire trust fund.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
    Base Budget $463,800 $3,349,409    $463,800 $3,349,409
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $463,800  $3,349,409     $463,800  $3,349,409 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Improved environmental results through a more informed and engaged public
    Objective Description
    These outreach activities provide for a better informed public that will improve environmental protection decisions and promote cleaner water, improved air quality, and protection of our land resources.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Foster an informed and engaged community
    Objective Strategies
    • Provide outreach efforts and support to community organizations, regional open houses, and partnerships with environmental education organizations.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of Virginia Naturally partners
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      370
      Date:
      12/31/2004

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (CY 2004)

      Measure Target Value:
      1200
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (CY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Number of partners are determined from the on-line DEQ database, and compared to the baseline (calendar year 2004).



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 4 of 22
Land Protection Planning and Policy (440 509 28)
Description

The land protection planning and policy service area involves the development and implementation of the overall waste management and remediation programs for the Commonwealth of Virginia to provide cleaner lands for its citizens.

This is accomplished through the coordinated efforts of regulatory development and planning, data analysis, policy and program development, and litter control and recycling staff. These groups work in concert to improve the understanding of waste management and land resource conditions provide information to the public and to decision-makers, assist in developing policies, formulate plans and strategies to reduce waste and contamination, improve land resources, strive towards implementation of the waste management hierarchy, and protect the Commonwealth’s land resources. These programs also help to ensure the Commonwealth meets the many state and federal mandates related to waste management.

The Virginia Coastal Management Program receives annual funding from NOAA under the federal Coastal Zone Management Act to implement and improve Virginia’s laws and policies that affect coastal resources within the defined coastal zone. This zone includes all cities, counties and towns that touch on tidal waters. By virtue of having a federally approved coastal zone management program, Virginia has the authority to require that federal actions be consistent with the state’s enforceable, incorporated coastal laws. DEQ's Environmental Impact Review Program coordinates the Commonwealth's review of Environmental Impact Reports for major state projects, federal documents developed pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act, permits for construction or expansion of public airports or runways, permits to drill for oil or gas in Tidewater, environmental documents addressing the exploration for and extraction of minerals on state-owned lands, and other federal intergovernmental reviews. DEQ reviews federal actions (direct, indirect, and federally funded) which affect Virginia's Coastal Zone to ensure consistency with the Virginia Coastal Program.

Reports from the regulated community under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act are received and managed for: (1) emergency releases of chemicals reportings (Section 304); (2) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) of lists of MSDS chemicals (Section 311); (3) Emergency and Hazardous chemical reporting - Tier I/Tier/II (Section 312); (4) and the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) reportings (Section 313). This information is made available to any citizen exercising his/her right-to-know what kinds and amounts of hazardous/toxic materials are stored, processed, generated, used, or released in the community. Support is provided to the Virginia Emergency Response Council (VERC); to conduct TRI data QA/QC and make data quality check against USEPA TRI data; to compile and publish annual Virginia TRI Summary Report by March of each year.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by determining and taking the actions needed to meet or exceed environmental protection goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. Section 6901 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and provides the principal framework for national, state, and local efforts to protect land and safely manage wastes.

    The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 9601 et seq.)
    CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund, created a tax on chemical and petroleum industries in order to fund responses to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances that may endanger public health or the environment. CERCLA goals are 1) to address cleanup of abandoned and uncontrolled hazardous waste disposal sites, 2) to establish a fund of money financed by an “environmental tax” on corporations; and, 3) to impose liability on private parties who have contributed to a site requiring clean up.

    Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 240 through 279, are the regulations promulgated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    The Virginia Waste Management Act [Chapter 14 (§ 10.1-1400 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the Virginia Waste Management Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for efforts to protect the Commonwealth’s lands and ensure wastes are properly managed.

    Environmental Impact Review Program:

    1) For reviewing state environmental impact reports, Virginia Code sections 10.1-1188 through 10.1-1192; Procedure for Environmental Impact Review of Major State Facilities, DEQ, 1998 (implementing sections 10.1-1188-1192); Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.

    (2) For reviewing federal environmental assessments and impact statements, Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.9; the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190), section 102(2)(C); Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500-1508 (implementing NEPA section 102(2)(C)).

    (3) For reviewing federal consistency determinations/certifications: Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (16 USC sections 1451-1465); Title 15, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 930; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.

    (4) For reviewing environmental documents on airport projects subject to licensing by the Department of Aviation: Virginia Code section 5.1-7; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.

    (5) For reviewing electric power generating projects and power line projects in conjunction with the licensing process of the State Corporation Commission: Virginia Code section 56-46.1.

    6) For reviewing oil and gas drilling proposals in the Tidewater region: Virginia Code section 62.1-195.1.

    (7) For intergovernmental review - Federal Executive Order 12372
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Hazardous waste facilities (regulated) 400 40,000
Solid waste facilities (regulated) 348 5,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
Individual citizens, businesses, industries, and local governments benefit from safe waste management practices and the resulting improvement their health, welfare, and quality of life. As the population increases additional stress will be placed on the waste management capacity. As these demands increase, it will be increasingly important to move towards implementation of the waste management hierarchy, in this order: avoiding the generation of waste (or source reduction), reuse, recycling, resource recovery (waste-to-energy), incineration, and landfilling, and ensure the proper management and oversight of waste disposal practices and facilities.
Partners
Partner Description
National/Local Environmental Groups Groups specifically interested in promoting safe and proper waste management
Other Citizen Interest Groups Other groups with general or particular interests in the waste management process.
Regional Solid Waste Management Planning Units Local Governments that work together to meet waste management goals and responsibilities.
U.S. EPA Federal agency responsible, in partnership with the states, for the implementation of the federal waste management statutes.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Policy – Develops overall agency waste management policies by working with agency stakeholders and with executive and legislative branch officials. This work results in legislative and programmatic initiatives to promote waste management goals.
    • Planning – Develops waste management program planning documents and information and reviews local solid waste management plans.
    • Regulatory Development – Develops regulations needed to implement and enforce waste management policies and plans.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Land Protection Planning and Policy comes primarily from general funds (92%), with a small amount from federal funds (8%).
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
    Base Budget $206,985 $17,572    $206,985 $17,572
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $206,985  $17,572     $206,985  $17,572 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Provide proactive policy, comprehensive planning, and effective program development
    Objective Description
    Increase solid waste recycling rates.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Increase solid waste recycling with better planning.
    • Work with planning units to improve solid waste management plans and increase their recycling rates.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of regional and local solid waste management planning units meeting the recycling rate mandate.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      48
      Date:
      12/31/2004

      Measure Baseline Description: % (CY 2004)

      Measure Target Value:
      95
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: % (CY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: The Recycling Rate Reports obtained from localities are used to determine the percentage of the 74 local solid waste planning units established in accordance with Section 10.1-1411 of the Virginia Waste Management Act, which achieve the recommended recycling rate. This is compared to the baseline (calendar year 2004).



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 5 of 22
Water Protection Permitting (440 512 25)
Description

Permitting for water protection involves the issuance of Virginia Pollution Discharge Elimination System (VPDES) permits and Virginia Pollution Abatement (VPA) permits for discharges of pollutants to state waters; Virginia Water Protection (VWP) permits for impacts to wetlands and streams related to development activities or surface water withdrawals; and Ground Water Withdrawal (GWW) permits for significant withdrawals from ground water in designated ground water management areas.

VPDES program authority is delegated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to Virginia in order to implement provisions of the Clean Water Act and ensuing regulations. Virginia State Water Control Law is also enforced through this program and its regulations. VPDES permits are issued to point source dischargers of wastewater in order to control discharged pollutants to the degree necessary to protect State waters. DEQ also operates a Pretreatment Program under VPDES to treat the toxic, hazardous and concentrated pollutants discharged as a result of industrial manufacturing processes. Pretreatment is the treatment of industrial wastewater at the industrial facility itself, before the wastewater is discharged into the local sewer system. The protection is achieved by regulating the non-domestic user of the municipal treatment works, commonly called industrial users or indirect dischargers.

The VPA permit program implements Virginia law for managing pollutants where there is no point source discharge but a potential impact to State waters exists. The most common activity regulated by this permit is land application of solid or liquid wastes.

The VWP permit program implements Virginia law to regulate activities involving fill and excavation in wetlands and streams and the withdrawal of surface water to assure maintenance of state waters at such quality as will protect or enhance all beneficial uses. The VWP permit program is also Virginia’s 401 Certification program under the Clean Water Act.

The GWW permit program implements Virginia law to designate ground water management areas and to regulate the withdrawal of ground water within these areas to assure that all existing lawful users can maintain their uses into the future. Withdrawals in excess of 300,000 gallons per month are required to apply for and receive a permit prior to initiation of withdrawal.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    The VWP, VPDES,VPA and GWW regulatory programs provide effective and responsible means of ensuring protection of the Commonwealth’s surface waters, groundwater, wetlands and aquatic resources, while allowing for continued economic development in an environmentally sound manner.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    At the Federal level, our authority is derived from the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Federal Code Cite: 33 U.S.C. Section 1251, et seq.,; CFR cites: 40 C.F.R. Parts 100-500), commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act. The Act establishes criteria for protection of water quality and aquatic uses, and many of our state regulations are derived from the Act. In addition, several programs in water protection are delegated to the states to implement on behalf of the federal government, and with their oversight.

    At the state level, Title 62.1. State Waters, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 3.1 and Chapter 25 Ground Water Management Act of 1992 are the overall Sections of the Code of Virginia that cover water protection activities. These are commonly referred to as Sections of the State Water Control Law.

    9 VAC 25-31 establishes the Virginia Pollution Discharge Elimination System regulations for discharging pollutants from point sources (i.e. pipes and outfalls) to state waters, 9 VAC 25-260 establishes the Virginia Water Quality Standards to protect aquatic uses, 9 VAC 25-790 are the Sewage Collection and Treatment Regulations that establish requirements for construction and operation of sewage treatment facilities, 9 VAC 25-32 establishes the Virginia Pollution Abatement program for to protect water quality and control runoff from land application of pollutants.

    For the Virginia Water Protection Permit Program, 9 VAC 25-210 is the regulation that establishes coverage, exemptions, application requirements, and mitigation sequencing for activities in wetlands and streams. There are also four general VWP permits for these same activities that are of a more minimal nature: 9 VAC 25-660 (WP-1) for impacts < ½ acre, 9 VAC 25-670 (WP-2) for facilities and activities of utility and public service companies regulated by the FERC or the SCC and other utility line activities, 9 VAC 25-680 (WP-3) for linear transportation projects, and 9 VAC 25-690 (WP-4) for impacts from development and certain mining activities.

    The Ground Water Withdrawal Regulations (9 VAC 25-610) establish criteria for declaration of ground water areas and criteria for the issuance of ground water withdrawal permits to any person within such areas that use more than 300,000 gallons of ground water per month.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
General permit holders 3,500 3,500
Groundwater withdrawal permittees 420 420
Permits for confined animal feeding operation facilities 115 115
Permits for land application of pollutants 100 100
Pretreatment program permittees 38 38
VPDES individual point source discharge permitees 1,125 1,125

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
No significant changes in the customer base are anticipated.
Partners
Partner Description
State and Federal Agencies DEQ participates with other state and federal agencies in the regulatory program in a cooperative manner through the permitting program. DEQ partners with local, state, and federal agencies, industry, environmental groups and other stakeholders typically serving on many different work groups and technical advisory groups. DEQ has even partnered with others (i.e., universities and Non- government organizations) on cooperative research and resource monitoring grants.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • DEQ reviews and issues permits and provides expertise and advice to a variety of customers, which ranges from specific projects to responding to general public inquiries. DEQ’s VWP, VPDES,VPA and GWW staff provide responsive evaluation of impacts and benefits of permit applications and compensation proposals; provide for forums for input by stakeholders when program changes or new initiatives are planned; and provide educational, technical and policy training and guidance to customers through a variety of means.
    • Other products and services of this program include development of procedural manuals, guidance, laboratory and field inspections, interpretations of laws and regulations, negotiating permit approvals with EPA, drafting permits, working with the permittees, the public, EPA, other State agencies and environmental groups to gather data, and monitoring the permitting activity as well as the losses and gains of the resource itself. DEQ manages, administers, develops, and implements guidance for these programs in order to issue consistent, timely and enforceable permits to protect and manage the states water resource in accordance with Federal and State laws and regulations. Audits of the regional permit files are conducted,and laboratory inspections are made with EPA to assure valid data is being generated and reported to DEQ. To streamline the permitting process for applicants and DEQ, general permits are developed and adopted as regulations. DEQ will also initiate updates of regulations to comply with Federal and State laws and regulations, review legislation for impacts to the Commonwealth, and address other complex permit issues as necessary.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Water Protection Permitting comes from federal funds (5%), general funds (42%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (53%) including water permit fees. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
    Base Budget $4,218,436 $5,813,369    $4,218,436 $5,813,369
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $4,218,436  $5,813,369     $4,218,436  $5,813,369 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Timely processing of accurate, effective and defensible permits that are environmentally protective
    Objective Description
    By achieving this objective, the permitting program will ensure that the quality of state waters is maintained, improvements in deteriorating waters are achieved and that the water resources of the Commonwealth will be utilized in a manner that assures that existing instream and offstream beneficial uses will be protected in the future. Reducing water pollution and conserving aquatic resources will result in improved health for Virginians, and protection and improvement in the Commonwealth’s water resources and the Chesapeake Bay.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Ensure that our wetland permit program addresses state and national goals of no net loss of wetland acreage and function.
    • Utilize audit and program assessment processes to facilitate efficient and effective practices.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of permits reissued prior to their expiration date
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      54.43
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Percentage (FY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      75
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percentage (FY 2012)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      85
      Date:
      6/30/2016

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Percentage (FY 2016)

      Data Source and Calculation: Statewide totals are obtained from permit information in the CEDS database, then compared to the baseline (FY 2005).

    • Number of acres representing the net change in non-tidal wetlands acreage
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      87
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (CY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      264
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (CY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: The measure reflects the annual difference between permitted impacts vs. acres compensated through creation, restoration and enhancement, and the purchase of credits at mitigation banks (does not include In-Lieu Fee Funds or Preservation). Statewide totals are obtained from permit information entered into CEDS. The net loss in acres of existing wetlands through permitted activities is offset against the net resource gain in acreage or function and compared to the baseline (FY 2005). Net gain is shown as a positive number, and net loss is shown as a negative number.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 6 of 22
Water Protection Compliance and Enforcement (440 512 26)
Description

The purpose of this service area is to ensure that facilities regulated by DEQ are in compliance with water protection requirements. Compliance activities involve inspecting permitted facilities that discharge to state waters to determine if they are adhering to the conditions of their permit and inspecting storage tank facilities to determine regulatory operational requirements. While minor corrective actions can be taken outside of formal enforcement, sometimes compliance activities result in formal enforcement actions to ensure that corrective actions are taken and remediation occurs.

Through regulation, inspection and approval of contingency plans, conducting or overseeing cleanup operations at sites contaminated by petroleum products, and assessing and responding to reported pollution incidents, DEQ seeks to reduce the number and severity of leaks from underground and aboveground storage tanks. Underground and aboveground petroleum storage tanks are required by law and regulation to meet operational and construction requirements for the early detection and prevention of leaks. DEQ accepts and maintains registration records of approximately 38,000 active regulated storage tanks; conducts compliance inspections at storage tank facilities; reviews and approves contingency plans for potential oil spills; and provides technical assistance to tank owners. The cleanup activity requires remediation of the many sites in Virginia that are contaminated by petroleum products each year (approximately 1500/year). As part of site corrective action clean water is provided to individuals with petroleum contaminated water supplies. The DEQ determines the Responsible Party (RP) and ensures that the RP performs proper site remediation. DEQ provides guidance on the extent of site characterization to be done, reviews characterization reports, requires cleanup activity appropriate to the environmental and health risks posed by the contamination and monitors cleanup progress. Where the RP of a petroleum release cannot be determined or is unable to correct the problem, DEQ conducts state-led investigations and cleanups. DEQ also processes reimbursement claims for investigation and cleanup by tank owners under this service area. The Pollution Investigation and Response activity is responsible for ensuring that the Agency appropriately assesses and responds to all pollution reports it receives, and for conducting DEQ planning and coordination necessary to ensure that the Agency meets its responsibilities in the event of an environmental emergency (primarily oil spill emergencies). This service area also provides the budgeting, tracking and other administrative functions required for the day-to-day operation of the Fund itself.

Inspections of VPDES permitted facilities will assure permit compliance and improve and protect water quality of Virginia’s surface waters. DEQ conducts onsite inspections of facilities having Virginia Pollution Discharge Elimination System (VPDES) permits for their discharges of pollutants to state waters. These facilities are required to monitor their discharge for compliance with their permit conditions and report the results to DEQ on a routine basis. DEQ inspects the approximately 1400 individual VPDES permit facilities and approximately 3500 general VPDES permit facilities for compliance with their self monitoring requirements. DEQ also validates VPDES self-monitored data, with the goal of protecting high quality waters and returning impacted waters to fishable and swimable.

Beginning January 1, 2008 the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) assumed regulatory oversight of all land application of treated sewage sludge, commonly referred to as biosolids. This action, which moves oversight of the Biosolids Use Regulations from the Virginia Department of Health to DEQ, was at the direction of the 2007 General Assembly, which voted to consolidate the regulatory programs so that all persons land applying biosolids would be subject to uniform requirements, and to take advantage of the existing compliance and enforcement structure at DEQ. DEQ has established an Office of Land Application Programs within the Water Division to manage the biosolids program, as well as land application of industrial sludges, septage, livestock and poultry waste, and water reclamation and reuse. The Virginia Department of Health will continue to consult with DEQ and advise the public on health issues related to biosolids applications.

In addition to directing that DEQ manage the biosolids program, the General Assembly added requirements to protect human health and the environment. Among these changes are the requirement for having and following nutrient management plans for all fields receiving biosolids, unannounced inspections of the land application sites, certification of persons land applying biosolids, and payment of a $7.50 fee per dry ton of biosolids land applied.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service protects and enhances Virginia’s environment and promotes the health and well-being of the citizens of the Commonwealth by preventing contamination to the lands and state waters, protecting high quality waters, ensuring that all state waters meet water quality standards that are protective of aquatic life uses.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Code of Virginia: Title 62.1, Chapter 3.1, Articles 9, 10, and 11
    Article 9 authorizes the DEQ to require cleanups from regulated underground storage tanks in accordance with federal requirements and Article 11 authorizes DEQ to require cleanup for all other types of oil spills including aboveground storage tanks. Article 10 authorizes disbursement from the Virginia Petroleum Storage Tank Fund for state-led cleanups.

    Federal citations: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle I
    This legislation authorizes the federal regulation of underground storage tanks.

    Code of Virginia: Title 62.1, Chapter 3.1, Articles 13, 19, 20 and 21
    The Articles identifies who can conduct inspections, when they can be performed, specifies the inspection forms to be used and states that inspections are to be unannounced and announced.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Commercial laboratories 100 100
Confined animal feeding operation facilities 115 115
Consultants 150 150
General VPDES permittees 3,500 3,500
Individual VPDES permittees 1,125 1,125
Regulated Tank Owners 8,000 8,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
The number of municipal permittees is stable and will not change appreciably in the future. Industrial dischargers are much more dynamic in nature and will fluctuate based on economic demands. In general industrial and municipal majors have large competent environmental staffs that keep their facilities in compliance with their VPDES permits. Smaller facilities do not have dedicated environmental personnel and as a result have more compliance issues.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Inspections and review of facilities, operations,and data. Through inspections and reviews of facility operations and data, better operating practices are implemented at petroleum storage tank facilities that should reduce the severity and frequency of leaks to the environment.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Water Protection Compliance and Enforcement comes from federal funds (17%), general funds (24%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (59%) including water permit fees and petroleum storage tank funds. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
    Base Budget $5,013,702 $15,647,342    $5,013,702 $15,647,342
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $5,013,702  $15,647,342     $5,013,702  $15,647,342 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Achieve certain, consistent, and timely enforcement
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Improve compliance with permits through outreach and compliance assistance inspections.
    • Implement risk based inspection strategy
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of facilities in compliance with water permit requirements
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain

      Frequency Comment: Federal Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      93
      Date:
      9/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Percentage (Federal Fiscal Year 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      93
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percentage (Federal Fiscal Year 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Using criteria set out by the Environmental Protection Agency and DEQ's CEDS database, calculate the number of facilities in significant noncompliance (SNC) during the fiscal year, and compare that to the universe of major facilities. Baseline year is Federal Fiscal Year 2005.

    • Cost of facility inspections at facilities identified as environmentally sensitive.
      Measure Class:
      Productivity
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Down

      Frequency Comment: Federal fiscal year (consistent with DEQ planning and reporting) Oct.1-Sep

      Measure Baseline Value:
      2975
      Date:
      9/30/2008

      Measure Baseline Description: Current annualized total cost (in dollars) of inspectors divided by number of inspections at facilities with environmental issues.

      Measure Target Value:
      2805
      Date:
      9/30/2011

      Measure Target Description: Resultant ratio (in dollars) from 1% increase in target non-compliance related inspections for FFY2009.

      Data Source and Calculation: Using data from DEQ's Comprehensive Environmental Data System (CEDS) and the Statewide Water Inspection Tracking System database, the number of water facility inspections resulting from generated Warning Letters (WL) and Notices of Violations (NOV) during the federal fiscal year will be obtained. Also the number of water facility inspectors will be determined from agency human resource data for the same period. The ratio of the total cost of the inspectors compared to the number of inspections resulting from WL's and NOV's represents the measure. A reduction in the ratio, measured in dollars, would be the desirable result, reflecting higher productivity within the inspection program.

  • Clean Contaminated Sites
    Objective Description
    DEQ facilitates the cleanup of contaminated property
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Implement a response and remediation schedule
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of Open Petroleum Cleanup Cases
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Down

      Frequency Comment: Calendar year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      1474
      Date:
      12/31/2008

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (cy 2008)

      Measure Target Value:
      1250
      Date:
      12/31/2011

      Measure Target Description: Number (cy 2011)

      Data Source and Calculation: The CEDS database is used to determine the number of open petroleum cases at year-end, then compared to the baseline levels measured during calendar year 2008.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 7 of 22
Water Protection Outreach (440 512 27)
Description

The water protection outreach service area involves providing information, training, technical assistance, and support to citizens, community groups, local governments, regulated facilities, and teachers about water resources protection and environmental protection programs in the Commonwealth. DEQ works with educational organizations, business and industry, local governments, schools, interested citizens and organized groups to inform people about watersheds the protection and restoration of Virginia’s water quality and water resources. DEQ’s outreach activities also provide technical assistance and training to regulated entities to help assure compliance with environmental statutes and regulations.

DEQ’s primary water protection outreach programs include: Environmental Education, Public Affairs, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator Assistance, Wastewater Treatment Plant Construction Assistance, Citizen Monitoring, Pollution Prevention, Environmental Impact Review, and Coastal Zone Management.

The Environmental Education Program provides training for community educators and classroom teachers, supports VA Naturally (a network of volunteers and community based organizations), and promotes community involvement.

The Public Affairs Program provides information to citizens and the media, maintains the agency’s website, and responds to citizen inquiries.

The Wastewater Treatment Operator Assistance and Construction Assistance Programs provides training and technical assistance to owners and operators of publicly and privately owned waste water treatment facilities.

The Pollution Prevention Program provides non-regulatory, voluntary pollution prevention assessments, training, workshops, research and information to assist facilities in reducing their environmental foot-print.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with DEQ’s mission by providing the assistance needed by communities and other organizations for meeting the water quality requirements to protect the quality of all state waters. Environmental Education and outreach programs help people understand the way the natural world works and how people influence and are influenced by their environment. It includes understanding how people, individually and collectively, can make responsible and informed decisions about their own behaviors and can act voluntarily to conserve or protect natural resources. It helps to ensure that the citizens we serve have access to information and have a better understanding of the programs implemented by DEQ. It improves the information provided for the agency’s use in making environmental protection decisions, which results in better decisions. This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by providing the information, technical assistance and understanding needed to meet or exceed environmental protection goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia]

    Title 62.1. State Waters, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 22. Virginia Water Facilities Revolving Fund.
    Section 62.1-224 through 62.1-232 of the Code of Virginia established the “Virginia Water Facilities Revolving Fund” as a permanent and perpetual fund to finance clean water projects in Virginia. The Federal Water Quality Act of 1987 first established a State Revolving Fund Capitalization Grant Program at the federal level.

    Coastal Program - Executive Order Twenty-three (2002)
    Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (federal legislation). The CZMA provides for development and implementation of state coastal zone management programs under Sections 305, 306/306A, 309, 310; triennial program evaluations under Section 312 and state coastal nonpoint source pollution programs under Section 6217.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Agricultural Producers 200 200
Communities 500 9,000
Environmental Education teachers 900 80,000
Local Governments 150 300
Non-Profit Organizations 3 100
Students 1,000 1,100,000
Wastewater Operators 700 6,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
[Nothing entered]
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Services: 1. Information to citizens, the media and other organizations through correspondence, media releases, the agency web-site and other venues 2. Technical Assistance to waste water treatment plants, citizen monitors, agencies, grantees and other customers (e.g. coordinating meetings, providing information, conducting conferences, initiating new programs) 3. Financial Assistance to grantees (e.g. funding positions, supplies, travel, etc) 4. Training and work-shops to support teachers, waste water treatment plants, citizen water monitors, local governments and community organizations
    • Products: 1. Educational products: magazine, brochures, website, exhibits, curicullum 2. Research products: reports, data, maps, interactive mapping sites & other online resources, management tools
    • Pollution Prevention: Implementation of 2005 legislation which codified the Virginia Environmental Excellence Program is expected to increase the number of participants in the Environmental Excellence Program.
    • Environmental Education: DEQ is working with 10 school divisions to develop system-wide environmental education implementation plans. As this moves forward, the number of teachers, community educators and citizens seeking information and assistance will increase.
    • Wastewater Treatment Operator and Construction Assistance: With adoption of new water quality standards to protect the Chesapeake Bay, most of the waste water treatment plants in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed will be required to upgrade and to optimize operation of the existing systems. This will significantly increase demands in this service area. The responsibility for providing assistance to facilities discharging to tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay with development and implementation of nutrient reduction interim optimization plans could potentially result in 100 or more additional facilities actively seeking program services. As discharge permit limits become more stringent the need for additional training on new and more complex treatment technologies increases. This is causing a significant increase in the number of system personnel seeking training and the topic areas in which training is required. A large portion of the operating staff of most treatment systems is nearing retirement age. In some cases as much as 75 – 80% of the key operating staff will be eligible to retire within the next 2 – 5 years As this occurs the number of people requiring both entry level and skill upgrade training will increase dramatically. It is difficult to project specific numbers but a 25 – 50% increase in the number of people requiring training is not unreasonable.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Water Protection Outreach comes from federal funds (62%), general funds (36%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (2%) including wastewater operating training fees and other special funds. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds. Many of the matching funds for Coastal Zone Management are provided by subrecipients.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
    Base Budget $1,547,632 $2,770,495    $1,597,632 $2,770,495
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,547,632  $2,770,495     $1,597,632  $2,770,495 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Improved environmental results through a more informed and engaged public.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Foster an informed and engaged community
    Objective Strategies
    • Conduct training institutes for science teachers, train 1,200 educators annually in Water Education for Teachers, conduct regional meetings with environmental educators, the Children’s Ground Water Festival, and class-room grants to assist with incorporation of environmental education materials into curriculum.
    • Increase access and availability to information about agency activities
    • Assist wastewater treatment facilities in development and implementation of interim optimization plans for existing treatment systems to evaluate system modifications to achieve optimum nutrient reductions and/or to address nutrient related compliance problems.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of educators attending environmental education professional development training programs
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      2000
      Date:
      12/31/2004

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (CY 2004)

      Measure Target Value:
      2000
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (CY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: DEQ Office of Environmental Education data is used to determine progress and then compared to the baseline (calendar year 2004).



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 8 of 22
Water Protection Planning and Policy (440 512 28)
Description

State and federal requirements for water quality and water resource plans and regulations have substantially increased in recent years to address areas that do not meet water quality standards, to restore the Chesapeake Bay, and to ensure a safe and adequate drinking water supply for all Virginians.

The water protection planning and policy service area involves the development and implementation of the overall water quality improvement and water resources protection programs for the Commonwealth. The basic approach to the water quality and water resources planning process is to:

• Examine water quality across the Commonwealth

• Identify areas where water quality needs improvement or water resources are stressed

• Develop and implement strategies to reduce pollution enough to bring about the necessary improvements to water quality or to manage the demands placed upon the water resources to ensure beneficial uses are protected

• Evaluate progress and ensure that the resulting water quality and water resources improvements remain in the future

This is accomplished through the coordinated efforts of DEQ water supply planning, ground water management, water quality planning, water quality research, regulatory development, and policy and program development staff. These groups work in concert to improve the understanding of ground water and surface water conditions, provide information to the public and to decision-makers, assist in developing policies, formulate plans and strategies to reduce water pollution, improve water quality, protect wetlands, and ensure every person in the Commonwealth has access to a safe and adequate water supply. These programs also help to ensure the Commonwealth meets the many state and federal mandates that promote water quality.

Water quality research initiatives include the water quality standards program and biological risk assessment activities. Water quality standards are the regulatory yardsticks against which we measure the water quality required to protect both aquatic life and the health of the citizens of the Commonwealth. This regulation consists of both narrative and numerical criteria and designated uses of state waters. Water quality standards serve as the regulatory basis for setting appropriate permit limits for the discharges to state waters under DEQ's water permitting programs. In addition, we compare our water monitoring data to the water quality standards to determine if the water quality is being maintained and to assess water quality for federal reporting requirements.

The biological risk assessment program involves three statewide monitoring programs (macroinvertebrate biomonitoring, fish tissue and sediment risk assessment, and lake monitoring) and the James River kepone fish tissue monitoring program. Information from the biological monitoring activities along with water chemistry information is used to assess whether current surface water quality is sufficient to support the designated uses specified in the water quality standards regulation for that water body. The results of these collections are summarized in the state water quality assessment report to Congress required under the Clean water Act. This information is also used by the regional staff in establishing water quality limited segments and assessments needs. Additionally, the Virginia Health Department uses the Kepone and statewide tissue monitoring information in establishing fishing health advisories and bans. Furthermore, the information collected from lake monitoring is also used to establish a priority ranking list of publicly owned lakes eligible for restoration grant funds under the Clean Water Act. It also serves as a basis for regulatory designation of nutrient enriched waters to control phosphorus in the permitted effluents.

Water Quality Planning consists of the following 4 components:

1. The 303(e) Continuing Planning Process;

2. The 303(d) Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Priority List;

3. The development of TMDL regulations; and

4. The 303(e) Water Quality Management Plans.

The 303(e) Continuing Planning Process describes all of Virginia’s water quality programs involved with attaining and maintaining the water quality of the waters of the Commonwealth.

The 303(d) TMDL Priority List identifies and describes the waters in the state which need TMDLs. These are waters which violate Virginia’s water quality standards and waters that receive effluent from treatment facilities which are scheduled to install advanced treatment to maintain water quality.

Virginia is required to develop TMDLs for all waters listed on the biennial 303(d) TMDL Priority List. The TMDLs have an extensive public participation process and are adopted by the state water Control Board as regulations.

The 303(e) Water Quality Management Plans are the repository of the TMDLs and the TMDL implementation plans for attaining and maintaining water quality standards.

Additionally, funding is included to support the Commonwealth's required membership in the Ohio River Basin Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (ICPRB) interstate compacts. These interstate compacts enhance cooperative planning for the resource management of these watersheds.

The Environmental Impact Review Program coordinates the Commonwealth's review of Environmental Impact Reports for major state or federal projects, construction or expansion of public airports or runways, oil or gas drilling in Tidewater, the exploration for and extraction of minerals on state-owned lands, and other federally required. The Virginia Coastal Program receives annual funding from NOAA to implement and improve its laws and policies that affect coastal resources within the defined coastal zone. This zone includes all cities, counties and towns that touch on tidal waters and all coastal waters out to the 3 mile territorial sea boundary. DEQ serves as the lead agency for this networked program of state agencies and local governments.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment and ensuring all Virginians will enjoy cleaner water that is available for all uses.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The federal Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. Section 1251 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection agency and provides the principal framework, and minimum requirements, for national and state efforts to protect water quality and water resources.

    Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, 40 CFR Sections 130 and 131 are the regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Clean Water Act.

    State Water Control Law (Title 62.1, chapters 2, 3.1, 3.2), is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality to protect and manage water quality and water resources in the Commonwealth.

    Ground Water Management Act (Title 62.1, chapter 25) is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board to establish ground water management areas and protect ground water resources.

    Surface Water Management Act (Title 62.1, chapter 24) is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the State Water Control Board to establish surface water management areas and manage surface water resources.

    Environmental Quality (Title 10.1, chapter 11.1) is the state law that establishes the Department of Environmental Quality.

    Environmental Impact Review Program-
    Executive Order Twenty-three (2002)
    Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (federal legislation). The CZMA provides for development and implementation of state coastal zone management programs under Sections 305, 306/306A, 309, 310; triennial program evaluations under Section 312 and state coastal nonpoint source pollution programs under Section 6217.
    1) For reviewing state environmental impact reports, Virginia Code sections 10.1-1188 through 10.1-1192; Procedure for Environmental Impact Review of Major State Facilities, DEQ, 1998 (implementing sections 10.1-1188-1192); Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (2) For reviewing federal environmental assessments and impact statements, Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.9; the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190), section 102(2)(C); Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500-1508 (implementing NEPA section 102(2)(C)).

    (3) For reviewing federal consistency determinations/certifications: Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (16 USC sections 1451-1465); Title 15, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 930; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (4) For reviewing environmental documents on airport projects subject to licensing by the Department of Aviation: Virginia Code section 5.1-7; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (5) For reviewing electric power generating projects and power line projects in conjunction with the licensing process of the State Corporation Commission: Virginia Code section 56-46.1.
    6) For reviewing oil and gas drilling proposals in the Tidewater region: Virginia Code section 62.1-195.1.
    (7) For intergovernmental review - Federal Executive Order 12372
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Industries and Businesses - Cooperative water supply planning 25 25
Local Governments 65 134

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
[Nothing entered]
Partners
Partner Description
Local governments
Other Virginia state agencies (Department of Conservation and Recreation, Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Department of Health, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services)
Stakeholder groups and environmental advocacy organizations
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Develops overall agency water quality and water resources policies by working with agency stakeholders and with executive and legislative branch officials. This work results in legislative and programmatic initiatives to promote water quality and water resources goals.
    • Develops water quality plans and strategies, including Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), develops state-wide water resources plans, and assists localities in developing and implementing local and regional water supply plans.
    • Develops regulations needed to implement and enforce water quality and water resources policies and plans.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Water Protection Planning and Policy comes from federal funds (40%), and general funds (60%). Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
    Base Budget $3,536,694 $2,422,480    $3,536,694 $2,422,480
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $3,536,694  $2,422,480     $3,536,694  $2,422,480 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Provide proactive policy, comprehensive planning, and effective program development
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Establish a state water resources plan with criteria for local/regional planning.
    • Implement water quality planning strategies.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of waters fully or partially removed from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Impaired Waters List.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      262
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (FY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      1075
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2012)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      1289
      Date:
      6/30/2020

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2020)

      Data Source and Calculation: DEQ provides EPA with periodic summaries of TMDL development progress. Implementation of TMDL plans has begun to increase. Water quality monitoring data is used to assess compliance with Water Quality Standards and compared to the baseline, measured on 6/30/2005. Note: The 2002 Virginia Impaired Waters List contained 1,430 waters. Despite the removal of 262 waters from the List by FY 2005, the overall number of impaired waters increased to 1,712 by FY 2006. Some of the waters that remain on the 2002 List will not have TMDLs completed until after 2010, with at least partial standards attainment expected by 2020. The schedule for fully or partially removing waters from the List is as follows: FY 2010 (total 1,075); by FY 2014 (total 1,175); and by 2020 (total 1,289). This data is based upon the expectation that waters will be at least partially restored to meeting water quality standards within 10 years of completing a TMDL. The Chesapeake Bay and Virginia Waters Clean-Up Plan (January 2007), developed pursuant to HB 1150 (2006) recognizes both fully and partially restored waters.

    • Percentage of Groundwater Technical Evaluations completed within the 60 day timeframe required by procedures manual.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      0
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Percentage (FY 2009)

      Measure Target Value:
      50
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percentage (FY 2012)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      85
      Date:
      6/30/2014

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Percentage (FY 2014)

      Data Source and Calculation: Totals are obtained from permit information in the GWPermit database, then compared to the baseline (FY 2009). Note: This is a new measure. The levels reported during FY 09 will be used as the baseline.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 9 of 22
Water Protection Monitoring and Assessment (440 512 29)
Description

State waters are monitored on a routine basis in order to assess their physical, chemical and biological quality to ensure that water quality standards are met and that waters are suitable for all aquatic uses. Chemical, benthic, and/or fish tissue data from surface waters are collected throughout Virginia at over 3,500 locations. These data are assessed (i.e. compared to state water quality standards) enabling a determination of whether water quality supports, or does not support, the historical (designated) uses available to benefit the public at large. Also included is targeted monitoring to determine if nutrient reductions requirements set forth by the Virginia Tributary Strategies to restore and protect the quality of the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal rivers are being met.

Surface water quantity data are used to process discharge permits, develop Total Maximum Daily Loads, evaluate water quality data, determine safe yields of water sources to support water supply planning activities, aide in the design of bridges and intake structures, and indicate the severity of a flood or drought. Part of the data collection effort includes conducting stream flow measurements during floods and droughts.

Groundwater data collected provides an indication of the impacts of numerous withdrawals on ground water resources, basic information to support water supply planning activities, and further indications of drought severity. The data are used to calibrate and verify the Coastal Plain Groundwater Model that is used to support the Groundwater Withdrawal Permitting Program.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Protects the quality of state waters enhances Virginia’s environment and is essential to enhancing the health and well being of the citizens of Virginia.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Federal Law: Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. Section 1251 et seq.)
    State Law:
    Water Quality Monitoring, Information, and Restoration Act (WQMIRA) (Section 621.-44.19:4. through 62.1-44.19:8)
    Title 62.1. State Waters, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 3.2. Conservation of Water Resources; State Water Control Board. Sec. 62.1-44.36. through 62.1-44.44. State Water Control Law

    The above sections of federal and state law require water quality in Virginia to be monitored and assessed to ensure they support their designated uses including fishing, swimming, and protection of aquatic life.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Citizens requesting copies of the 305(b) report 300 500
Local governments 300 300
Professional consultants 25 40

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
[Nothing entered]
Partners
Partner Description
National Weather Service Provides data to U.S.Geological Survey for use in flood routing
Office of Emergency Services Provides space and data at gauging stations for the IFLOWS emergency flood program
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Provides data
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Provides financial support and policy review
U.S. Geological Survey Provides both water quality and water quantity data
Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries, and Department of Forestry APCO Electric Utility
Virginia Department of Health Provides beach monitoring data and fish consumption advisories
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Includes the routine monitoring of state waters, and collection and assessment of related data.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Water Protection Monitoring and Assessment comes from federal funds (13%), general funds (84%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (3%). Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
    Base Budget $6,262,473 $1,152,380    $6,262,473 $1,152,380
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $6,262,473  $1,152,380     $6,262,473  $1,152,380 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Enhance monitoring and assessment
    Objective Strategies
    • Finalize and implement water quality monitoring strategy
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of watersheds for which an assessment of surface water assessment has been conducted
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      873
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (FY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      1217
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2012)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      1238
      Date:
      6/30/2020

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2020)

      Data Source and Calculation: Using 305(b) Water Quality Assessment Reports and DEQ databases, determine the number of watersheds which have been assessed. The baseline data was collected during 2005. Although preliminary watershed analysis described 1275 watersheds in Virginia the final delineation of 1247 watersheds better represents the number of watersheds that are shared by Virginia and surrounding states. Note: An assessment of surface water quality in each of the 1247 watersheds in Virginia is required between years 2002 – 2020. Because 9 watersheds have been found to contain no perennial waters, the maximum number of watersheds for which an assessment can be made is 1238.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 10 of 22
Air Protection Permitting (440 513 25)
Description

The air permitting service area issues permits for companies to construct and operate in a manner that will protect, maintain and improve air quality without discouraging economic development in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Permit writers work with companies and citizens to assure that when a company constructs or modifies a facility, the amount of pollution that will be released into the air will be minimized to the greatest extent possible. After construction, operating permits are issued to companies to guarantee they will continue to operate in compliance with all requirements to protect the health of Virginia citizens and air quality.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of its citizens by issuing effective, accurate, defensible permits that are environmentally protective and technically achievable.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The Clean Air Act (42 USC 7401 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and provides the principal framework for national, state, and local efforts to protect air quality.

    Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 through 99 are the regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the Clean Air Act.

    The Virginia Air Pollution Control Law [Chapter 13 (§10.1-1300 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia] are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the State Air Pollution Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for the efforts to protect air quality in the Commonwealth.

    Regulations of the Board are the regulations promulgated by the State Air Pollution Control Board to implement the Clean Air Act, and the Virginia Air Pollution Control Law.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Permittee facilities 1,848 1,848

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
No major change in the number of sources is anticipated in the coming years.
Partners
Partner Description
Federal Land Managers (FLMs) The FLMs administer the nation’s federal Class I areas (national parks, wilderness areas and memorial parks). The FLMs include the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service (USFS), the National Park Service (NPS) and the Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The FLMs are charged under the Clean Air Act (§165) to protect and enhance the Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs) of the Class I areas from the adverse effects of air pollution. The FLMs comment and participate in the permitting process of any air permit that may adversely affect a Class I area in Virginia. The Shenandoah National Park and the James River Wilderness Face are both Class I areas.
Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) MARAMA provides training on an ongoing basis to improve permit writers knowledge of regulations and topics that are incorporated into air permits, ultimately improving the quality and accuracy of air permits. The members of MARAMA include Virginia, Maryland, DC, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey and North Carolina.
National/Local Environmental Groups Groups specifically interested in assuring permits are protective of the environment.
Other States' Agencies Permit information is shared among State Agencies, especially states that border Virginia (North Carolina, Maryland, West Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, D.C.) to assure a permit in a surrounding state will not adversely affect Virginia.
Other Virginia agencies (such as Virginia Department of Health) VDOH assists in assuring levels of toxic pollutants are set to ensure public health is protected.
State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators/Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials Provides an opportunity to interact with officials from air permit programs across the country through monthly conference calls and workshops. Provides a forum for interaction with EPA Office of Air Quality Programs and Standards (OAQPS).
Trade Associations Organizations such at the Virginia Manufacturers Association (VMA) work with permitting staff to ensure that the permits reflect an accurate picture of the air pollution controls available and the economic consequences of potential air permit conditions.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Federal agency responsible for the implementation of the Clean Air Act and achieving air quality standards and goals.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Permits – Issue air permits that are protective of human health and the environment while maintaining a productive economic climate in Virginia. Develop and issue new major and minor source construction permits that allow a source to build while employing the best available control technology and methods to minimize air pollution emissions. Develop and issue operating permits (Title V and State Operating Permits) that require a source to operate in compliance with all applicable requirements.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Air Protection Permitting comes from federal funds (10%), general funds (15%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (75%), primarily Title V fees. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds. Use of the air permit fees is restricted by federal statute.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
    Base Budget $881,276 $5,159,926    $881,276 $5,159,926
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $881,276  $5,159,926     $881,276  $5,159,926 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Timely processing of accurate, effective and defensible permits that are environmentally protective
    Objective Description
    This objective is of critical importance to meeting the overall agency mission as well as the long and short term objectives and goals of enhancing Virginia's environment and the health and welfare of the citizens of the Commonwealth.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Utilize audit and program assessment processes to facilitate efficient and effective practices.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of tons of emissions from major sources mitigated through the permitting process
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      97
      Date:
      6/30/2007

      Measure Baseline Description: Percent (FY 2007)

      Measure Target Value:
      97
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percent (FY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Using information submitted in permit applications and engineering calculations, difference between a new major (Title V) source’s potential to emit (24 hrs/day, 7 days/week, 52 weeks/year or 8760 hours) and the permitted limit (allowable emissions). This number will be divided by the potential to emit. Compare this to the baseline year (FY 2007 data).

    • Percentage of Minor New Source Review (NSR) permits issued within the 90 day regulatory deadline.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Fiscal year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      94
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Percent (FY 09)

      Measure Target Value:
      96
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percent (FY 12)

      Long-range Measure Target Value:
      98
      Date:
      6/30/2014

      Long-range Measure Target Description: Percent (FY 14)

      Data Source and Calculation: Statewide totals are obtained from the permit information in the CEDS database, then compared to the baseline (FY 2009)



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 11 of 22
Air Protection Compliance and Enforcement (440 513 26)
Description

The air compliance and enforcement regional staff conduct field inspections of stationary sources of air pollution, to evaluate compliance with all applicable state and federal regulations. The approach includes an evaluation of all permit requirements, self-reporting data from facilities, continuous monitoring equipment, air pollution control equipment, and visible stack emissions.

When discrepancies are discovered, staff utilizes agency policies to pursue a timely and appropriate enforcement response. This enforcement response enables DEQ to bring a facility back into compliance in an expeditious manner, which reduces the overall impact on the environment.

In Northern Virginia, vehicle emissions are the single greatest source of air pollution. The DEQ vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I&M) program reduces ozone forming pollutants, by requiring tail-pipe emissions testing on all vehicles. Vehicles that fail to pass an emissions test, are required to be repaired, then re-tested.

These program areas also serve to meet the many mandates that promote clean air at the federal and state levels.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by enforcing and taking the actions needed to meet or exceed clean air goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7401 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and provides the principal framework for national, state, and local efforts to protect air quality.

    Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 through 99, are the regulations promulgated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Clean Air Act.

    The Virginia Air Pollution Control Law [Chapter 13 (§ 10.1-1300 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the State Air Pollution Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for efforts to protect air quality in the Commonwealth.

    Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law [Article 22 (§ 46.2 1176 et seq.) of Chapter 10 of Title 46.2 of the Code of Virginia] is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the motor vehicle emissions inspection program, provides the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provides the principal framework for the operation of the program.

    Regulations of the board are the regulations promulgated by the State Air Pollution Control Board to implement the federal Clean Air Act, the Virginia Air Pollution Control Law, and the Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Facilities subject to stationary source air inspection 1,350 4,663
Vehicle owners subject to emissions inspections 745,466 1,750,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
The number of areas and citizens impacted by poor air quality has recently increased due to the recent adoption of more stringent federal standards. As a result, additional inspections at source facilities will be required.
Partners
Partner Description
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Federal agency responsible for the implementation of the Clean Air Act and achieving air quality standards and goals.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    [None entered for this Service Area]
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Air Protection Compliance and Enforcement comes from federal funds (9%), general funds (17%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (74%), primarily air permit fees and Motor Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance fund. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds. Use of the air permit fees is restricted by federal statute.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
    Base Budget $1,031,424 $5,176,541    $1,031,424 $5,176,541
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,031,424  $5,176,541     $1,031,424  $5,176,541 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Achieve certain, consistent, and timely enforcement
    Objective Description
    Develop and implement all necessary plans, policies and related programs necessary to improve air quality in the Commonwealth and provide cleaner air for its citizens
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Achieve focused, more efficient programs to meet or exceed environmental standards
    Objective Strategies
    • Implement the air compliance program consistent with US EPA’s National Compliance Monitoring Strategy and Virginia’s Risk Based Inspection Strategy.
    • Implement the mobile source I&M policy by performing vehicle inspections on half of all registered vehicles in Northern Virginia subject to the program.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of full compliance evaluations performed, compared to the annual compliance monitoring plan
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Federal Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      92.5
      Date:
      9/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Percentage (FFY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      95
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percentage (FFY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Data related to the number of inspections is obtained from the agency's comprehensive environmental database (CEDS) and compared to the baseline year (Federal FY 2005).

    • Percentage of eligible, registered vehicles in nonattainment areas that were inspected
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain

      Frequency Comment: Calendar Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      46
      Date:
      12/31/2004

      Measure Baseline Description: Percentage (cY 2004)

      Measure Target Value:
      46
      Date:
      12/31/2012

      Measure Target Description: Percentage (cY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Data relating to the number of inspections is obtained from the agency’s vehicle database and compared to the baseline year (cy 2004).



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 12 of 22
Air Protection Outreach (440 513 27)
Description

The air protection outreach service area involves providing information, training, technical assistance, and support to citizens, community groups, local governments, regulated facilities, and teachers about the air quality and air quality protection programs in the Commonwealth. DEQ works with educational organizations, business and industry, local governments, schools, interested citizens, and other organizations to inform people about air quality and environmental protection and programs. DEQ also provides technical assistance to regulated entities to help assure compliance with environmental statutes and regulations.

DEQ’s primary air protection outreach programs include: Environmental Education, Public Affairs, and Pollution Prevention. The Environmental Education Program provides training for community educators and classroom teachers, supports a network of volunteers and community based organizations, and promotes community involvement. The Public Affairs Program provides information to citizens and the media, maintains the agency’s website, and responds to citizen inquiries. The Pollution Prevention Program provides non-regulatory, voluntary pollution prevention assessments, training, workshops, research and information. Implementation of Virginia’s Environmental Excellence Program includes a mentoring program, and financial and regulatory incentives to participating facilities. DEQ's Environmental Impact Review Program coordinates the Commonwealth's review of Environmental Impact Reports for major state and federal projects, construction or expansion of public airports or runways, drilling for oil or gas in Tidewater, the exploration for and extraction of minerals on state-owned lands, and other federal intergovernmental reviews. The Environmental Impact Review Office also reviews new or expanded energy generation and transmission projects which require a certification from the State Corporation Commission.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with DEQ’s mission by providing the assistance needed by communities and other organizations for meeting the air quality requirements. Environmental Education and outreach programs help people understand the way the natural world works and how people influence and are influenced by their environment. It includes understanding how people, individually and collectively, can make responsible and informed decisions about their own behaviors and can act voluntarily to conserve or protect natural resources. It helps to ensure that the citizens we serve have access to information and have a better understanding of the programs implemented by DEQ. It improves the information provided for the agency’s use in making environmental protection decisions, which results in better decisions. This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by providing the information, technical assistance and understanding needed to meet or exceed environmental protection goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The federal Clean Air Act, as amended: 42 U.S.C. Section 7401, et seq.
    Sections 507, 110-112 of the federal 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

    Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia establishing the Department of Environmental Quality and establishing its purpose, including the enhancement of public participation, pollution prevention, and public education on environmental protection.

    State Air Pollution Control Law, Title 10.1. Chapter 13. Air Pollution Control Board. Establishes the State Air Pollution Control Board and the policies and programs to protect Virginia’s air quality. Specifically Article 2, which establishes the Small Business Technical & Environmental Compliance Assistance Program (Section 10.1-1323. through 10.1-1326.)

    Coastal Program - Executive Order Twenty-three (2002) and Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (federal legislation).
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Community Organizations 500 9,000
Regulated facilities 313 4,663
Small Businesses 10,000 50,000
Students 1,000 1,100,000
Teachers 900 80,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
The customer base is constantly changing as EPA and Virginia promulgate additional air regulations.
Partners
Partner Description
Virginia Department of Business Assistance The Department of Business Assistance administers the loan program of the Small Business Environmental Compliance Assistance Fund, through an interagency agreement, for the Department of Environmental Quality.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Services: 1. Information to citizens, the media and other organizations through correspondence, media releases, the agency web-site and other venues 2. Technical Assistance to agencies, grantees and other customers (e.g. coordinating meetings, providing information, conducting conferences, initiating new programs) 3. Financial Assistance to grantees (e.g. funding positions, supplies, travel, etc) 4. Training and work-shops to support teachers, local governments and community organizations
    • Products: 1. Educational products: magazines, brochures, website, exhibits 2. Research products: reports, data, maps, interactive mapping sites & other online resources; management tools.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Air Protection Outreach comes from general funds (16%), and primarily from nongeneral fund resources, including air permit fees (55%) and Motor Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Funds (29%). Restrictions on the allowable use of these funds exist in both federal and state statutes.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
    Base Budget $124,545 $668,096    $124,545 $668,096
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $124,545  $668,096     $124,545  $668,096 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Improved environmental results through a more informed and engaged public
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Foster an informed and engaged community
    Objective Strategies
    • Increase marketing.
    • Enhance regulatory development and program activity.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Total number of facilities in good standing with, and continuing to meet,Virginia Environmental Excellence Program requirements
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: State Fiscal Year

      Measure Baseline Value:
      197
      Date:
      6/30/2005

      Measure Baseline Description: Number (FY 2005)

      Measure Target Value:
      525
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Number (FY 2012)

      Data Source and Calculation: Using the DEQ database, determine the number of facilities in good standing with Virginia Environmental Excellence Program (VEEP), and compare it to the baseline, measured at the end of FY 2005.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/24/2014   12:18 pm
Department of Environmental Quality (440)
Biennium:
Service Area 13 of 22
Air Protection Planning and Policy (440 513 28)
Description

The air protection planning and policy service area involves the development and implementation of the overall air quality improvement program for the Commonwealth of Virginia to provide cleaner air to its citizens. The basic approach to the air quality planning process is to:

• Examine air quality across the Commonwealth

• Identify areas where air quality needs improvement

• Inventory the sources contributing to the problem

• Determine the degree of air quality improvement needed

• Develop and implement strategies to reduce emissions from the contributing sources enough to bring about the necessary improvement in air quality

• Evaluate progress and ensure that the resulting air quality improvement remains in the future

This overall process is accomplished through the coordinated efforts of DEQ air policy, planning, data analysis, and regulatory development groups. These groups work in concert to formulate policies and then turn them into plans and strategies to reduce air pollution and improve air quality. This program area also serves to meet the many mandates that promote clean air at the federal and state levels.

DEQ's Environmental Impact Review Program coordinates the Commonwealth's review of Environmental Impact Reports for major state and federal projects, construction or expansion of public airports or runways, drilling for oil or gas in Tidewater, the exploration for and extraction of minerals on state-owned lands, and other federal intergovernmental reviews.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area is essential to supporting the agency mission of enhancing the environment in the Commonwealth and the health and well being of it citizens by determining and taking the actions needed to meet or exceed clean air goals.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7401 et seq.) is the federal law that provides the enabling authority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and provides the principal framework for national, state, and local efforts to protect air quality.

    Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 through 99, are the regulations promulgated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement the federal Clean Air Act.

    The Virginia Air Pollution Control Law [Chapter 13 (§ 10.1-1300 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], along with the Department of Environmental Quality Law [Chapter 11.1 (§ 10.1-1182 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia], are the state laws that provide the enabling authority for the State Air Pollution Control Board and the Department of Environmental Quality, provide the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provide the principal framework for efforts to protect air quality in the Commonwealth.

    Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law [Article 22 (§ 46.2 1176 et seq.) of Chapter 10 of Title 46.2 of the Code of Virginia] is the state law that provides the enabling authority for the motor vehicle emissions inspection program, provides the authority for the promulgation of associated regulations, and provides the principal framework for the operation of the program.

    Regulations of the board are the regulations promulgated by the State Air Pollution Control Board to implement the federal Clean Air Act, the Virginia Air Pollution Control Law, and the Virginia Motor Vehicle Emissions Control Law.

    Environmental Impact Review Program:
    (1) For reviewing state environmental impact reports, Virginia Code sections 10.1-1188 through 10.1-1192; Procedure for Environmental Impact Review of Major State Facilities, DEQ, 1998 (implementing sections 10.1-1188-1192); Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (2) For reviewing federal environmental assessments and impact statements, Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.9; the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190), section 102(2)(C); Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500-1508 (implementing NEPA section 102(2)(C)).
    (3) For reviewing federal consistency determinations/certifications: Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended (16 USC sections 1451-1465); Title 15, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 930 (“Federal Consistency Regulations” implementing the Coastal Zone Management Act, section 307(c), relative to federal consistency with approved state coastal zone management programs; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (4) For reviewing environmental documents on airport projects subject to licensing by the Department of Aviation: Virginia Code section 5.1-7; Virginia Code section 10.1-1183.
    (5) For reviewing electric power generating projects and power line projects in conjunction with the licensing process of the State Corporation Commission: Virginia Code section 56-46.1.
    (6) For reviewing oil and gas drilling proposals in the Tidewater region: Virginia Code section 62.1-195.1.
    (7) For intergovernmental review - Federal Executive Order 12372
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Industries and businesses 313 4,663

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
The number of areas and citizens impacted by poor air quality has recently increased due to the recent adoption of more stringent federal standards.
Partners
Partner Description
Local Air Quality Planning Organizations (LPOs) Local air quality planning groups specifically established and certified by the Governor to assist in the development of air quality plans.
National/Local Environmental Groups Group specifically interested in promoting air quality improvement and impacting to formulation of air quality plans and policies on the state and national levels.
Other Citizen Interest Groups Other groups with general or particular interests in the air quality planning process.
Other Local Planning Organizations (PDCs/MPOs) Other organizations that have vested interests in benefits and impacts of the local air quality planning process on transportation and economic development interests.
Other State Agencies (VDOT) VDOT in particular to coordinate the air quality and transportation planning processes.
Regional Air Quality Planning Organizations – Planning and technical support organizations that represent multiple states to address air quality issues that are regional in nature.
U.S. EPA Federal agency responsible, in partnership with the states, for the implementation of the Clean Air Act and achieving air quality standards and goals.
Washington Council of Governments A local government group which promotes the implementation of the Clean Air Act and achieving air quality standards and goals.
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    [Nothing entered]
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Coordinate overall agency air quality policies by working with the executive and legislative branches.
    • Establish and communicate agency air quality policies and priorities.
    • Develop initiatives for actions that require legislative authority.
    • Serve as liaison to the State Legislature and the State Air Pollution Control Board
    • Prepare air quality plans and strategies in consultation with local organizations designed to reduce air pollution and meet air quality standards.
    • Develop attainment plans for areas that do not meet air quality standards.
    • Develop maintenance plans for areas that have met air quality standards.
    • Coordinate with regional and local organizations to develop these plans.
    • Regulatory Development – Develop regulations needed to implement and enforce air quality policies and plans.
    • Develop air quality regulations to reflect agency policies and enact the strategies developed during the air quality planning process.
    • Revise these regulations as needed to respond to changes in federal/state requirements or air quality needs.
    • Research, Evaluation, and Assessment – Determine status of areas regarding air quality standards. Evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of proposed policies, plans, and regulations and estimate the resulting environmental benefits. Track the progress towards meeting established air quality and pollution reduction goals.
    • Determine and track overall emissions levels (emissions inventories).
    • Estimate emission reductions resulting from control strategies and measures.
    • Analyze air quality benefits of plans and strategies using air quality simulation (modeling) and other analytical techniques.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    DEQ funding for Air Protection Planning and Policy comes from federal funds (17%), general funds (25%), and other nongeneral fund revenues (58%), primarily air permit fees and Motor Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance fund. Use of the available federal funds requires matching funds. Use of the air permit fees is restricted by federal statute.
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $800,299 $2,354,567    $800,299 $2,354,567
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $800,299  $2,354,567     $800,299  $2,354,567 
    Base Budget $800,299 $2,354,567    $800,299 $2,354,567
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $800,299  $2,354,567     $800,299  $2,354,567 
    Base Budget $800,299 $2,354,567    $800,299 $2,354,567
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $800,299  $2,354,567     $800,299  $2,354,567 
    Base Budget $800,299 $2,354,567    $800,299 $2,354,567
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $800,299  $2,354,567     $800,299  $2,354,567 
    Base Budget $800,299 $2,354,567    $800,