Agency Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Mission and Vision

Mission Statement
We promote the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture, provide consumer protection, and encourage environmental stewardship.
Vision Statement
We envision VDACS as a nationally and internationally recognized agricultural development, marketing, consumer protection, animal health, and environmental organization that achieves world class customer service and results for the citizens of the Commonwealth; is a model agency known for the quality leadership of our people and excellence in agency operations; uses strategic planning and management along with partnering with clients to provide the highest quality, innovative services to the Virginia agriculture and agribusiness industry, consumers and all citizens; and promotes the highest standards of competency, ethics, fairness and respect in all aspects of work and employment for VDACS staff in order to attract and retain a highly effective work force.
Agency Values

Executive Progress Report

Service Performance and Productivity
  • Summary of current service performance
    VDACS is achieving its mission within the parameters of the resources that are available. VDACS has been able to achieve this service level by streamlining the organization, reducing levels of supervision, utilizing technology, partnering with industry and consumer groups, pursuing and obtaining federal grant resources and the outstanding productivity of a highly skilled and experienced work force.
  • Summary of current productivity
    VDACS is providing increased services with fewer employees and resources than in past decades as a result of increased productivity. We continue to serve more customers with fewer employees and resources than were available ten to twenty years ago, as our maximum employment level decreased by 26% (from 701 positions in 1991 to 519 today). The percentage increases to a 29% reduction in staff to support our historical customer base prior to the merger of the Department of Charitable Gaming into VDACS in 2008. The agency’s customer base in most program areas increases while these resources continue to decline. We simply cannot keep up with the growth in food establishments and weighing and measuring devices. In the areas of marketing agricultural products and animal disease control, the agency has made changes in the way we provide services to accommodate for the global economy in which the Commonwealth’s agricultural industry operates.

    Because we are a very diverse agency in terms of the services we provide, it is difficult to summarize our productivity. Progress made in many of our areas is discussed in the "Summary of Major Initiatives and Related Progress" section of this report. Other productivity is listed below.

    We enforce motor fuel quality standards to ensure that qualtiy petroleum products are available and that inferior products are removed from the retail market through testing and analysis. Customer complaints are investigated and resolved as needed.

    Our Consumer Protection Hotline provides callers with information about their rights as consumers and the workload is affected by the state of the economy, introduction of new products and technologies, population growth, etc. Consumers may also seek and receive information on-line via the agency's Consumer Assistance Portal.

    The Consumer Affairs Office serves as a clearinghouse for the investigation or referral of complaints related to the advertisement, sale, or lease of goods and services that are intended for personal, family or household use. The Office also investigates consumer complaints regarding unfair, decepetive or illegal business practices.

    The Weights and Measures Program:
    •Calibrated 3,008 radar tuning forks for local law enforcement agencies.
    •Conducted 8,676 calibrations of standards of mass, volume, and length for industry and government.
    •Conducted 64,437 tests of weighing and measuring equipment and rejected 11,583 for inaccuracies.
    •Conducted verification inspections of 35,797 items using scanner systems, citing inaccuracies on 1,793 of the items.
    •Randomly checked the weight of 27,678 packages, finding 3,859 to be inaccurate.

    Analyzed 1,340 official seed samples and 1,774 service samples for industry. Official seed analysis resulted in the rejection of 133 lots. Penalty assessments for Seed Law violations totaled $13,679. Reviewed labels and registrations for 2,775 products.

    Collected for analysis 1,896 commercial feed samples and animal remedy samples. Analysis of samples revealed 110 samples in violation. Penalty assessments totaled $2,800. Reviewed labels and registrations for 2,371 products.

    Collected for analysis 82 samples of lime, and reviewed labels and registrations for 9 products. Analysis of samples revealed six samples to be in violation.

    Collected for analysis 713 samples of fertilizer, reviewed labels and registrations for 178 products. Analysis of samples revealed 129 samples in violation, resulting in $14,482.91 in penalties.

    We continued to monitor for fraud and abuse in Charitble Gaming:
    •Audited 124 charitable organizations and 22 suppliers.
    •Investigated 40 reported cases of alleged criminal activity in charitable gaming establishments.
    •Inspected 910 charitable gaming events.
    •Issued permits to approximately 550 charitable organizations during FY 2009.

    Our Office of Consumer Affairs continued to serve the citizens of Virginia by:
    •Responding to 47,280 calls to the Consumer Protection HOTLINE or approximately 3,940 calls per month.
    •Receiving, processing, and investigating or mediating 2,863 consumer complaints.
    •Recovering $888,245 in refunds and other values for consumers through the investigation of consumer complaints, voluntary settlements, and court judgments.

    Other progress in the Division of Consumer Protection were in the Office of Pesticide Services where staff:
    •Collected 76,957 containers in the state-wide Pesticide Plastic Container Recycling Program for a total of 930,687 containers recycled since 1993. This equates to over one million pounds of plastic collected for refabrication.
    •Certified 6,147 private applicators, 6,168 commercial applicators, and 5,252 registered technicians to apply pesticides within the Commonwealth.
    •Licensed 2,399 pesticide businesses and registered 13,618 pesticide products.

    In the Office of Plant and Pest Services:
    •Issued 4,106 phytosanitary certificates to allow movement of lumber, logs, pine bark and hardwood mulch, plants, bulbs/rhizomes, apples, peanuts, cotton, soybeans, and seeds to numerous foreign countries.
    •Protected Virginia’s cotton crop by monitoring cotton boll weevil traps on 60,280 acres of cotton in Virginia; no weevils were detected.
    •Inspected and registered 342 nurseries comprising 6,742 acres and 1,789 establishments selling retail nursery stock which were randomly inspected and certified so as to ensure the public of relatively pest-free nursery stock.
    •Continued follow-up surveys of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) eradication treatments in Fairfax County. Two new positive EAB sites were discovered in Fairfax County resulting in the EAB quarantine of ten northern Virginia localities in 2008 and the implementation of a statewide EAB survey in the spring of 2009.
    •Surveyed 12,532 acres for the presence of the imported fire ant and conducted fire ant treatments on 8,493 acres.

    Increased sales opportunities for growers as well as buyer awareness of Virginia agricultural products by managing 27 production area sales tours and/or grower visits to corporate buying facilities. As a result of one specific production area tour and a corporate buyer visit, more than $900,000 in new business was developed by one Virginia grower.

    Answered 558 grower and food processor requests for sales leads, marketing assistance, and VDACS services resulting in an increase in potential sales, development of marketing programs, and increased agency visibility.

    Distributed 1,011 viable sales leads to vegetable, fruit, seafood, nursery, and specialty food companies resulting from 931 visits with buyers, merchandisers, and corporate executives throughout 14 states and Canada. Made 697 grower visits to discuss sales opportunities, marketing programs, and review product packaging.

    Developed working relationships with major retail chain store buyers, restaurants, and farm markets resulting in more than $325,000 in new sales for two Virginia companies specializing in fresh herbs and heirloom tomatoes.

    As a result of staff developing a working relationship with personnel associated with the Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, several Washington, D.C. area chefs, general managers and owners made 10 production area tours visiting 20 Virginia farms. Several restaurants have changed their menus to feature “Grown in Virginia” products. The total impact of Virginia grown products purchased by Washington area restaurants from farmers and processors exceeded $335,000.

    Distributed $46 million in federal funds and USDA donated foods to approximately 400 public and private entities participating in the National School Lunch Program, the Child and Adult Feeding Program, and the Institutional Feeding Program. Provided food assistance to over 600,000 low-income households by distributing $9,063,170 of USDA donated food to Virginia food banks. Disbursed $900,000 in administrative funds to six food banks to assist in the cost of the distribution of USDA donated food.

    Statewide, the staff of Livestock Marketing Services (LMS) was directly involved in facilitating sales and assisting Virginia livestock producers in merchandising 219,985 head of livestock for the year ending June 2009. These marketing programs added more than $7.9 million in value to Virginia’s livestock farmers through their participation in the sale of livestock in organized, state graded marketing activities. LMS staff directly assisted in over $117 million of total value of all classes of livestock.

    Assisted two producers from Scott and Russell counties to market Choice fed cattle at a special state-graded sale in Staunton on July 15, 2008. Choice heifers weighing 1,000–1,400 pounds sold for $95.85–97.10 per cwt. The producers had previously only been offered $86–87 per cwt for the cattle at the farm. These were the first fed cattle shipped from southwest Virginia in a decade. The producers plan to market another load at the special sale in the future.

    Coordinated a group of cattlemen in the Fauquier County area to explore marketing opportunities for feeder cattle meeting the requirements and specifications of several branded natural beef programs. Assisted producers, who represented more than 1,400 cows, to coordinate management and production practices. In November, a trailer load of steers averaging 750 pounds sold for $114 per cwt. (hundredweight) which was $10 per cwt higher than the same quality steers not qualifying for “Natural.”

    Worked with SUSTA’s staff at the Food & Hotel China show in Shanghai on December 4–6. This is the biggest show of its kind in China. As a result of its participation in the show, a Virginia exporter has generated interest in its lines of organic baby food. This exporter exhibited at the show and has commenced shipments to the Japanese market.

    Participated in World Food Moscow, September 22–26, 2008, where the main emphasis was promoting Virginia seafood. As a result, an order was placed for Virginia scallops. Staff also made an important contact with a Russian culinary institute for possible marketing of Virginia products to that country.

    Worked with Virginia Marine Products Board and the Florida Department of Agriculture on a reverse trade mission of Korean seafood buyers coming to the International Boston Seafood Show on March 14–16, 2009. After meeting with SUSTA suppliers at the show, this Korean delegation traveled to Virginia to visit suppliers. Valuable contacts were established and orders will likely materialize shortly.

    Worked on the sale of Virginia produced yellow conch to the Hong Kong/China markets. The market is about 1.5 million pounds annually and is worth about U.S. $9.5 million. As a result of this direct buyer contact, Virginia has about 60–70 percent of the market, approximately $5.4 million.

    Worked to stabilize the major export markets for Virginia hardwood by conducting trade missions, organizing reverse trade missions, communicating with prospective customers, and assisting Virginia companies making sales trips to these markets. Among states, Virginia ranked eleventh in value of wood products exported in 2008. Virginia’s top customers in 2008 were Canada, China, Italy, the United Kingdom (UK), Spain, and Vietnam.

    Worked with the Hardwood States Export Group and received free booth space at the 2009 Dubaiwood trade show in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE), in April 2009. Two Virginia wood products companies participated as exhibitors and one took orders for just under $100,000 worth of hardwood flooring.

    Assisted a company with securing new contacts for their feed additive in Mexico and Venezuela. The Mexican buyer has purchased additional product and the Venezuelans are testing the product in livestock rations.

    Worked with over 170 retail farmers’ markets and other direct marketing businesses to ensure that the Virginia Grown marketing program and related promotional materials were available and used to help consumers easily identify Virginia agribusiness products in the marketplace.

    Secured an agreement between VDACS and USDA’s National Organic Program to distribute $100,000 in cost-share funds to qualifying Virginia certified organic producers and processors. Virginia producers or processors, who have become certified or recertified during the 2007–2010 time periods, can apply for reimbursement of 75 percent of their certification costs up to $750. At the end of the fiscal year, 41 applications had been approved and forwarded to USDA for reimbursement totaling nearly $26,000.

    Worked to develop a program to enable Shenandoah Area Fruit and Vegetable producers to sell their “seconds” (less desirable produce, typically discarded or composted) to D.C. Central Kitchen’s Food Bank. This strategy ensures an additional income stream for the producers and better nutritional choices for the clients—the Food Bank services. As a result of this VDACS initiated program, D.C. Central Kitchen is making weekly trips to the auction to buy fresh produce. Donations from the farmers in the community have also been increasing to serve the Food Bank project.

    Published the 2008 Virginia Grown Christmas Tree Guide, which included 73 tree farms offering their trees on a choose-and-cut, fresh-cut or live basis directly to the consumer. Published the 2009 Virginia Grown Guide that included 223 farms and farmers markets throughout Virginia, a 30 percent increase over 2008. Both guides were publicized through press releases and distributed to more than 300 distribution outlets statewide, as well as individuals.

    Coordinated monthly reviews of potential Virginia’s Finest products. Evaluated more than 100 products submitted by 97 Virginia companies and/or farms between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009. Increased the number of Virginia’s Finest display racks that are located in retail establishments across the Commonwealth to at least 39 locations, including a Hampton Roads area commissary.
Initiatives, Rankings and Customer Trends
  • Summary of Major Initiatives and Related Progress
    The agency continues to use technology to serve our customers as funding will allow. In the Office of Laboratory Services, a new technology project to move to a new Animal Health Reporting System was initiated. This will replace an old, DOS based system, and enable us to better serve our customers and monitor animal diseases. The agency developed a farm-to-school education and match-making website that presently lists more than 24 school districts representing 370,000 Virginia students, 11 farms, and three distributor companies. It also created and launched an enhanced Virginia’s Finest website to promote and showcase Virginia specialty foods, beverages, and additional agricultural products and partnered with Virginia Interactive to develop a new Virginia Grown website to promote and showcase Virginia agricultural products. Created a dedicated web link on the VDACS website for information regarding Organic Certification in Virginia. The website features basic information and resources as well as grant opportunities, cost share information, organic related news, and events. A new electronic inspection tool was launched in the Office of Weights and Meaures to streamline inspection and reporting efforts. The Office of Consumer Affairs Complaint system was redesigned in FY 09 to provide better service to the citizens. We also continued efforts to move to a system by which our clients can pay fees electronically.

    We continue to move our marketing of Virginia's agriculture into the global market place. Some examples of progress in FY 09 included: certifying 45,900 dozen shell eggs exported to Canada, 21,000 dozen shell eggs exported to Iraq, and 54,180 dozen shell eggs exported to Oman; assisted in the export of 1,047 head of beef heifers to Izmir, Turkey; coordinated an exhibit at the 2009 Animalia Istanbul trade show for livestock in June 2009 with several thousand attending the activity and showing considerable interest in Virginia and U.S. livestock genetics; continued to expand commodity sales in the Asia-Pacific Region through introductions between a Virginia exporter and Virginia producers and suppliers of wheat, corn, soybeans, soybean meal and other product (as a result of the development of these relationships, during the past year, 15,000 tons of soybeans and 20,000 tons of soybean meal, respectively, were exported to Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam; a new product, soy hull pellets, is now being exported to Southeast Asia; Virginia wheat exports of 11,000 tons are destined to Southeast Asian countries from various smaller Virginia grain companies as a result of the Division of Marketing’s efforts to build the relationship between the exporter and supplier. Additionally, we managed a trade mission in November, 2008 to the Havana International Trade Fair (FIHAV) in Cuba, and as a result additional contracts were signed for apples and soybean meal. Contract sales for Virginia agricultural to Cuba exceeded $40 million. Our Division of Animal Industry Services is also instrumental in the export and import arena and in cooperation with other state and federal partners, monitored the international and interstate import and export of animals. The following animal movement was monitored: 325,590 head of cattle, 16,539 horses, 3,075 sheep, 106,543 swine, 34,662 small animals and 13,303 miscellaneous other animals (including birds and exotic animals).

    Staff from the Office of Commodity Services enhanced marketability of $2 billion worth of poultry, eggs, grains, fruits, vegetables, and peanuts through grading, inspection, and quality certification services.
    -Added approximately $27.4 million to the value of poultry through marketing and grading programs.
    -Graded 1.1 billion pounds of poultry products with an approximate value of more than $1.3 billion.
    -Inspected and weighed 49 million bushels of barley, soybeans, corn, and wheat for export and domestic sales. Approximate value of grain, soybean meal, and corn gluten inspected was over $512 million.
    -Provided grading and certification services that facilitated the movement of $181.9 million worth of fruits, vegetables and peanuts through marketing channels. Volume inspected totaled 305,366 tons.

    We worked with local Purchase of Development Rights programs to protect five farms with agricultural conservation easements purchased in part with VDACS’ matching funds, saving 903 acres of farmland. These efforts continue into FY10. We also continue our work to help younger generations transition into farming as older generations retire.

    The agency continued to protect our food and dairy supply through inspection efforts. The agency conducted 13,830 food safety inspections and visits in 11,685 firms on file. We received and investigated 789 consumer complaints alleging violations of the Virginia Food Laws and collected 13 service samples from consumers to enhance thoroughness of complaint investigations. A total of 271,998 pounds of foods were found to be adulterated during routine inspections or as the result of food related disasters. These foods were destroyed.

    The Office of Meat and Poultry Services (OMPS) ensured the safety of more than one million pounds of meat and poultry products. No food borne illnesses were traced to product inspected by OMPS.

    The Division of Animal and Food Industry Services continue to protect our livestock and poultry industries and to monitor for animal disease outbreaks. Veterinary diagnosticians at the regional animal health laboratories (RAHLs) examined at necropsy 296 avian cases, 356 bovines, 175 equines, 71 ovines, 95 caprines, 12 porcines, 234 canines, 109 felines, and 100 other miscellaneous animals. The necropsy numbers for most species were slightly decreased over previous years, except for avian, feline and ovine cases, which increased.

    In addition to the tissues collected by the diagnosticians during necropsies in the RAHLs, the Office of Laboratory Services (OLS) pathologist examined fixed tissues from approximately 890 cases submitted by private veterinary practitioners, which was a slight increase. The bacteriology laboratories at the Harrisonburg and Warrenton RAHL were only 2 of approximately 12 laboratories nationwide certified to perform testing for Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM). Additionally, diagnosticians at the agency's RAHLs continued to provide support for rabies surveillance and control to local animal control offices, local Health Departments, and local veterinary practitioners by accepting rabies suspects, removing brains for testing and submitting those tissues to the Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS) laboratories for testing.

    The Division maintained the federally required level of surveillance and testing of Virginia cattle to qualify for continued Tuberculosis-free and Brucellosis-free status. Cattle surveillance included 10,325 Brucellosis tests at slaughter plants, 25,178 Brucellosis vaccinations, 199,983 animals tagged for market traceability, 60 herds certified negative for Brucellosis, 58 herds accredited negative for Tuberculosis, three Market Cattle Investigations, eight BRT herd investigations, 9,431 Caudal Fold Tests, and 17 Comparative Cervical Tests.
    They maintained the federally required level of surveillance and testing of Virginia swine and feral swine for continued state Pseudorabies-free status. This surveillance included the monitoring, quarantine, testing and depopulation of feral swine as needed. We monitored avian health in order to maintain the viability of Virginia’s poultry industry. Staff sampled a total of 2024 birds on 452 premises resulting in a total of 546 tests completed by Lab Services as part of the Live Bird Market Cooperative Agreement. Veterinarian Services also sampled a total of 2907 birds on 270 premises resulting in a total of 980 tests completed by Lab Services as part of the National Poultry Improvement Plan.

    We provided disease monitoring services to ensure compliance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations at 1504 regularly scheduled sales at livestock markets, 220 feeder calf sales, 55 cow/calf sales, 25 equine sales/auctions, 12 breeding sheep consignment sales and 562 equine events. We continued to conduct a Scrapie control and eradication program. Currently, Virginia has a total of 42 sheep flocks and goat herds enrolled in the Scrapie Flock Certification Program. The Virginia Scrapie state regulation went into effect on October 3, 2008. A USDA review of Virginia’s Scrapie control and eradication program rated it as excellent and enabled the continued designation as a “consistent” state in regard to compliance with federal requirements. Thus, Virginia remains eligible for USDA Cooperative Agreement Scrapie program funds and sheep and goats are allowed fluid interstate movement.

    In FY 09, 1,268 livestock premises were registered by the Virginia Animal Identification Program, bringing the statewide total to 9,390. Over 4,400 840 radio frequency identification (RFID) tags were distributed to livestock producers through the Private Practitioner Initiative. Also conducted outreach efforts to continue to inform Virginia livestock owners about the National Animal Identification System.

    Our work in the Animal Welfare arena continues to increase. We worked cooperatively with Basic Animal Control Officer Training Course providers in Virginia in order to facilitate the development and approval of such courses across the state. Staff also worked with jurisdictions, professional organizations, animal welfare organizations, and other state and federal agencies to ensure the availability of approved continuing training courses for Virginia’s animal control officers, and provided animal euthanasia training on an as-needed basis as a service to local jurisdictions. We performed 143 inspections of public animal pounds and private animal shelters. Staff also developed new inspection materials and protocols to enhance the efficacy and efficiency of FY 2010 animal pound and shelter inspections. Staff maintained the Virginia Dangerous Dog Registry, in which 253 dogs deemed dangerous by Virginia’s court system are registered. During FY 09, significant progress was made in ensuring cooperation by local government partners in gathering and recording information required by the registry.
  • Summary of Virginia's Ranking
    VDACS is recognized by industry and consumer partners as an effective and efficient organization. The agency is extremely diverse; therefore, it is difficult to assess and compare agency operations and programs with other state departments of agriculture who may have different responsibilities, programs, and levels of resources. VDACS has a strong national and regional presence through the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture, the Southern Association of State Departments of Agriculture and the Southern U.S. Trade Association.
  • Summary of Customer Trends and Coverage
    The agriculture and agribusiness industries are changing rapidly. These Virginia industries must operate and compete in a global economy. Prices are established in the world market place for a vast array of commodities and products. Competition and costs are driving many in the industry out of business. Still others are finding opportunities and niches for new products and new markets. The latest agriculture census shows that in Virginia the number of small farms and large farms are growing but we are losing medium size farms. We are also losing farmland at a rapid pace as development pressures continue to result in the conversion of farm land to housing and commercial activities. However, the Office of Farmland Preservation within this office is working to ebb this trend.

    The Division of Charitable Gaming expects the total number of qualified organizations to remain fairly stable for the next biennium. However, with the implementation of HB 1998 – Electronic Pull-tabs – and the final approval of the gaming regulations for organizations and suppliers; this could potentially increase the request for permitting both organizations and suppliers.

    Analysis of Impact of Aging Population:
    During fiscal year 2009, changes in current programs and services provided by VDACS have had a minimal impact on seniors and adults with disabilities. While all VDACS programs and services are designed to serve all citizens, an analysis of VDACS programs and services revealed that only the Division of Marketing and Division of Consumer Protection provide direct services to seniors. For example, VDACS Division of Marketing staff has partnered with the Virginia Department for the Aging and local Area Agencies on Aging to implement the USDA grant funded Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP). The program targets low income senior citizens in eleven Virginia counties and seven cities who meet the criteria of 175% below poverty who with $40.00 worth of seasonal food check allotments can purchase locally produced fresh fruits, vegetables and cut herbs from 143 farmer vendors. The 2007 USDA grant is $365,075. VDACS's responsibility is to certify Virginia farmers to participate in the program by determining that applicants produce sufficient quantities of product to exchange for senior food checks.

    Other examples of VDACS services to seniors that are being provided by the Division of Consumer Protection include the following:

    1. Virginia Department for the Aging: The Virginia Department for the Aging (VDA) is a charter member of the Consumer Affairs Advisory Committee. This committees members communicate the views and interests of Virginians on issues related to the agencys consumer education and fraud prevention programs. Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) staff interacts frequently with counselors at the Center for Elder Rights, which is housed in VDA.

    2. Virginia Department of Social Services (DSS), Division of Community and Volunteer Services: OCA staff routinely partners with DSS to provide educational sessions at retirement communities and events aimed at seniors.

    3. TRIAD: TRIAD is a cooperative effort between the Office of the Attorney General, local law enforcement and senior groups that is designed to educate and assist senior citizens on issues of crime and fraud. OCA is a frequent participant at regional and statewide TRIAD events.

    The programs and services provided by VDACS do not require the clustering of clients by age groups or disability. Rather, all VDACS programs and services are available to all individuals regardless of age or disability. The aging of the population and adults with disabilities will have no significant impact on VDACS's ability to continue providing these services.
Future Direction, Expectations, and Priorities
  • Summary of Future Direction and Expectations
    The threat of animal disease, plant diseases and pests, food safety and Homeland Security have been exacerbated by the global economy. The opportunities for the spread of diseases, pests and terrorism have increased worldwide due to travel and international movement of people, animals, etc.

    Consumer Protection requirements are also increasing rapidly. The number of regulatory inspections of food retailers, processors, weights and measures devices, etc. continues to grow as new stores, gasoline retailers, businesses, etc. are built to serve an expanding population and development. The internet and identity theft issues have also created consumer fraud opportunities. Local governments have closed Consumer Affairs offices and weights and measures programs and turned those responsibilities over to VDACS creating additional workload. Lastly, population growth is simply creating more demand for Consumer Protection services.
  • Summary of Potential Impediments to Achievement
    The changes in Virginia agriculture, Homeland Security issues and the increase in Consumer Protection demands will severely challenge VDACS. Staffing and resource limitations will, by necessity, force the agency to be selective in setting priorities and objectives. International marketing, farmland preservation, niche and specialty crop marketing and small farmer assistance will be priorities. Other areas and issues may not be served or services will be limited. Animal disease, plant disease and pests will be another priority. Other routine programs will again not be served or services reduced.

    Homeland Security and emergency planning and prevention of animal diseases, plant diseases, plant pests, food safety and terrorism issues will challenge the agency to fulfill its role in these areas due to resource limitations. Some of these are new and evolving responsibilities for which VDACS has received no additional resources.

    The level of customer service and operational efficiency and effectiveness which has been a hallmark of VDACS can be expected to erode over the next few years. Without an infusion of resources, VDACS will need to prioritize services and focus the existing resources on the priority areas. The agency is pursuing federal grants in areas where they are available, developing and expanding partnering relationships with USDA, State and local agencies, industry and consumers to maintain service levels. However, the complexities and level of demand for services is very likely to out pace VDACS’ ability to provide quality services. Further, with 30% of the agency workforce eligible for full retirement, VDACS will likely suffer productivity losses as these highly skilled and experienced employees leave the agency.

    In addition to an increasing customer base in many areas, the agency's General Fund budget has been reduced continually since the early 1990s. The FY 09 General Fund base budget decreased by 16% before additional reductions anticipated in FY 10. This reduction, in combination with an increasing customer base, will impact services. The information technology transformation project by the Commonwealth is also impacting services provided to our customers. In addition to the additional cost for infrastructure services, all agency staff have been impacted by administrative time required to deal with service issues from the partnership efffort.
Service Area List

Service Number Title
301 457 08 Distribution of USDA Donated Food
301 531 01 Animal Disease Prevention and Control
301 531 02 Diagnostic Services
301 531 04 Animal Welfare
301 532 01 Grading and Certification of Virginia Products
301 532 04 Milk Marketing Regulation
301 532 05 Marketing Research
301 532 06 Market Virginia Agricultural and Forestry Products Nationally and Internationally
301 532 08 Agricultural Commodity Boards
301 532 09 Agribusiness Development Services and Farmland Preservation
301 535 04 Plant Pest and Disease Prevention and Control Services
301 541 01 Agricultural and Food Emergencies Prevention and Response
301 550 01 Consumer Affairs - Regulation and Consumer Education
301 552 07 Regulation of Grain Commodity Sales
301 552 12 Regulation of Weights and Measures and Motor Fuels
301 554 01 Regulation of Food Establishments and Processors
301 554 02 Regulation of Meat Products
301 554 03 Regulation of Milk and Dairy Industry
301 557 04 Pesticide Regulation and Applicator Certification
301 557 06 Regulation of Feed, Seed, and Fertilizer Products
301 559 01 Gaming Organization Licensing
301 559 02 Charitable Gaming Management Training
301 559 03 Gaming Organization Audits
301 559 04 Gaming Organization Enforcement
301 559 05 Gaming Organization Inspection
301 599 00 Administrative and Support Services
Agency Background Information

Statutory Authority
Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia establishes the powers for the Commissioner, the Board of Agriculture & Consumer Services, the Divisions and Program Areas within the Department, and other entities related to the promotion of agricultural interests and providing consumer protection.

Chapter 1 of Title 3.2 directs the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services to advise the Governor on the state of the agricultural industry and to work closely with all agencies concerned with rural resources development.

Chapter 1 of Title 3.2 requires the Commissioner to see to the proper execution of the laws relating to the subject of his agency. This section also requires the Commissioner to investigate and promote subjects relating to the improvement of agriculture.

Title 3.2 and other titles establish responsibilities for the promulgation of regulations and the Commissioner’s duties for administering these regulations.

The Virginia Administrative Process Act (Title 2.2, Chapter 40) establishes specific requirements that the Department must follow in reviewing and making regulations. Although not considered as mandates, agency public participation guidelines adopted as required by the APA affect the process for making regulations.

The Virginia Register Act (Title 2.2, Chapter 41) establishes requirements relating to the public availability of information about state agency regulations. State agencies must file information concerning regulations with the Registrar of Regulations for publication in the Virginia Register of Regulations and the Virginia Administrative Code.

The Virginia Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (Title 2.2, Chapter 37) establishes requirements concerning the disclosure of records held by the Department that are requested by the public. This Act also establishes requirements concerning the conduct of board meetings. Based on the requirements of this Act, the Department has adopted certain policies relating to the conduct of board meetings and the disclosure of records that affect the agency’s handling of requests from the public for access to records.

The FOIA also establishes requirements concerning public notification of meetings. State agencies, boards, etc., are required to provide notice of public meetings. Normally this notice is provided by publication of the meeting information in the Virginia Register of Regulations. Currently there are twenty boards associated with the Department that hold at least one meeting a year for which such notice must be provided.

Several state laws that create different boards, foundations and councils make the Commissioner a member of trustee with certain duties and responsibilities. Some of these include the following: Sheep Industry Board (Title 3.2, Chapter 21), Virginia Agricultural Council (Title 3.2, Chapter 29), Chippokes Plantation Farm Foundation (Title 10.1, Chapter 2), Virginia Horse Industry Board (Title 3.2, Chapter 17), Radiation Advisory Board (Title 32.1, Chapter 6), State Certified Seed Board (Title 3.2, Chapter 40), and Plant Pollination Advisory Board (Title 3.2, Chapter 28).

The Agricultural Stewardship Act (Title 3.2, Chapter 4) establishes requirements concerning the Commissioner’s handling of complaints received about water pollution involving agricultural activities, the investigation of these complaints, the approval of plans to correct any pollution problems, assurance that such plans are implemented in accordance with a timetable established by the Act, and the publication of an annual report on the handling of complaints.

The Virginia Personnel Act and related federal and state regulations and policies affecting personnel matters establish requirements that the Department must fulfill in the management of human resources.

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is mandated by federal and state laws regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or physical ability. The federal and state laws and executive orders listed below guarantee these rights. This list is not all-inclusive, but rather documentation of key mandates which govern personnel matters.

-Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.
-The Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972
-Equal Pay Act of 1963
-Higher Education Act of 1972, as amended.
-Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended.
-Executive Order 11246 as amended by Executive Order 11375
-Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
-Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978
-Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)
-Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986
-Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures of 1978
-Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and Amendments Contract Work Hours and Safety
-Family and Medical Leave Act

State laws, policies and procedures affecting printing and the publication of materials impact the Department. The special mandate relating to VDACS publications is § 3.2-4725 that requires VDACS to publish notices of certain license revocations.

Title 2.2 of the Code of Virginia relates to the administration of state agencies. Other mandates are contained in Chapter 935 of the 1999 Virginia Acts of Assembly and policies established by the central agencies of state government.

Chapter 723 (Item 68 and Item 767, F1 and F2) approved May 3, 1991 authorized the Department of General Services to assess a rental charge to occupants of buildings it controls, operates and maintains.

Chapter 32 of Title 3.2 establishes the State Milk Commission and provide for its composition and authority.

Executive Order 65 issued April 1, 2004 states: “In accordance with the duties and responsibilities assigned in the Plan, the head of each designated state department or agency shall appoint a lead and at least one alternate Emergency Coordination Officer for the agency.”

Chapter 1 of Title 3.2 charges the Commissioner with…”the dissemination of information relative to the advantages of soil, climate, healthfulness and markets of this Commonwealth, and to resources and industrial opportunities offered in the Commonwealth…”

Chapter 2 of Title 3.2 establishes the Office of Farmland Preservation; Farm Link program and sets the powers, duties, and reporting requirements of these programs.

Chapter 26 of Title 3.2 establishes the Aquaculture Development Act including the Aquaculture Advisory Board; and sets the powers and duties of the Act and the meeting requirements of the Board.

Section 58.1-3239 of the Code of Virginia, which relates to special tax assessment of land for preservation purposes, establishes the State Land Evaluation Advisory Council, which includes the Commissioner and certain other state officials.

Section 58.1-3240 establishes the duties of the Commissioner for providing uniform standards to localities for determining whether real estate qualifies as being devoted to agricultural use for the purposes of tax assessment. The current standards make the Commissioner responsible for interpreting these standards at the request of local commissioners of revenue.

Chapter 1 of Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia (Code) authorizes the Commissioner of VDACS to establish mechanisms by which to receive complaints and related inquiries from consumers involving violations or alleged violations of any law designed to protect the integrity of consumer transactions in the Commonwealth.

Chapter 5 of Title 57 of the Code provides for the regulation of charitable solicitations in Virginia.

Chapter 17 of Title 59.1 of the Code gives authority to the Commissioner to inquire into possible violations of the Virginia Consumer Protection Act (Act). The Act delineates 41 various misrepresentations and deceptions as prohibited practices that are violations if committed by a supplier in connection with a consumer transaction. It also provides for the enforcement of 26 other consumer protection laws by declaring violations of those statutes as prohibited practices.

Chapter 44 of Title 59.1 of the Code gives authority to the Commissioner to inquire into possible violations of the Virginia Telephone Privacy Protection Act.

Chapter 7 of Title 61.1 of the Code, relating to Handling and Sale of Burley Tobacco.

Chapter 19.1 of Title 62.1 of the Code, Cleaning Agents.

Chapter 7 of Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia (Code) authorizes the Commissioner of VDACS to conduct survey, eradication and suppression measures for plant pests determined to be new or injurious and authorizes the establishment of quarantines.

Chapter 7 of Title 3.2 of the Code provides for annual inspection of all Virginia plant nurseries; authorizes the stop sale of nursery stock or articles suspected of being infested or infected with plant pests; and provides for the inspection and certification of plants or plant products to allow pest-free sale or movement.

Chapter 8 of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to survey for weeds not widely distributed in Virginia and when an infestation exists within the Commonwealth, he may request the Board to declare the weed to be noxious; the Board may establish quarantines to prevent the movement or sale of noxious weeds; and the Commissioner shall conduct eradication or suppression of noxious weeds to prevent their dissemination in the Commonwealth.

Chapter 44 of Title 3.2 of the Code mandates inspection of bee colonies suspected of being infected with disease and requires eradication or control of such disease; mandates inspection and certification of colonies offered for sale and colonies to be transported interstate when requested; and promotes the science of beekeeping to ensure an adequate supply of pollinators.

Chapter 10 of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to take actions necessary to conserve, protect, restore or propagate endangered or threatened species of plants and insects; allows controlled harvest of a species listed as threatened when the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services has determined that its abundance in the Commonwealth justifies such harvest; and prohibits the removal, possession, transport, and sale of threatened or endangered species other than from a person’s own land.

7 U.S.C. § 136 et seq., the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), establishes national requirements for the registration, sale, use and distribution of pesticides, as well as the certification of pesticide applicators.

Chapter 39 of Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia (Code), the Virginia Pesticide Control Act, provides for the regulation of pesticides in the Commonwealth.

Chapter 56 of Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia (Code) authorizes the Commissioner of VDACS to establish an inspection and testing program designed to remove inaccurate weighing and measuring devices from the marketplace, assure the accurate measurement of packaged commodities, verify if item pricing by point-of-sales systems using bar codes and scanners are correct, and regulate business practices. The Commissioner is responsible for the investigation of complaints made to him concerning violations.

Chapter 12 of Title 59.1 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to conduct an inspection and testing program designed to protect the consumer and end user of petroleum products against inferior quality products. The Commissioner is responsible for the investigation of complaints made to him concerning violations.

Chapter 2.2 of Title 59.1 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to require each petroleum refiner to file a list of retail outlets operated by such refiner and require each franchise dealer to file a listing of any retail outlets operated by such franchise dealer, and to keep such lists current.

Chapter 47of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to license and bond certain individuals involved in the commission based sales of agricultural commodities. The Commissioner is responsible for the investigation of complaints made to him concerning violations.

Chapter 58 of Title 3.2 of the Code provides for the regulation of individuals acting as Public Weighmasters.

Chapter 7 of Title 61.1 of the Code gives authority to the Commissioner to administer and enforce this law governing the sales of burley tobacco.

Chapter 19.1 of Title 62.1 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to seize any cleaning agent held for sale or distribution which contains phosphorus in violation of this chapter.

Chapter 36, of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to inspect, test, and regulate all fertilizers distributed in the state.

Chapter 37 of Title 3.2 of the code authorizes the Commissioner to inspect, test, and regulate all liming materials distributed in the state.

Chapter 40 of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to inspect, test, and regulate all seed distributed in the state.

Chapter 48 of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to inspect, test, and regulate all commercial feed distributed in the state.

Chapter 49 of Title 3.2 of the Code authorizes the Commissioner to inspect, test, and regulate all animal remedies distributed in the state.

Chapter 47 of Title 3.2 of the Code of Virginia authorizes the Division of Marketing and its activities in general, which include the administration of the Food Distribution Program and cooperation with USDA, to administer this program in Virginia.

§§ 3.2-4753 through 3.2-4763 Dealers in Grain Products

§§ 3.2-4322 through 3.2-4327 Grain Handlers

§§3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708 Sale of Farm Produce, In General

§§3.2-4100 through 3.2-4111 Virginia Seed Potato Inspection Law and Seed Potato Board

§§3.2-4600 through 3.2-4613 Controlled Atmosphere Storage of Apples and Peaches

§§3.2-4500 through 3.2-4506 Apple Grading, Packing and Marking

§§3.2-3400A through 3.2-3402 Certification of Agricultural Products in General

§§3.2-4300 through 3.2-4311 Grades, Marks and Brands Generally, General Provisions

Title 3.2, Chapter 47 mandates the marketing services of the Division of Marketing, which include the marketing programs conducted through the commodity boards.

Title 3.2, Chapter 11 mandates limitations on the diversion of dedicated funds for the Boards.

Each of the sixteen commodity boards is mandated by a separate law, but each has the same purposes, which are market development and/or promotion, research and education. Additionally, the Virginia Sheep Board mandate includes predator control. The specific sections of the Code of Virginia are:

§§ 3.2-1700 through 3.2-1722, the Virginia Horse Industry Board Act;
§§ 3.2-2500 through 3.2-2510, the Virginia Dark Fired Tobacco Board;
§§ 3.2-2400 through 3.2-2411, the Virginia Bright Flue-Cured Tobacco Board;
§§ 3.2-1200 through 3.2-1217, the Virginia Apple Board;
§§ 3.2-1900 through 3.2-1910, the Virginia Peanut Board;
§§ 3.2-2300 through 3.2-2314, the Virginia Soybean Board;
§§ 3.2-1800 through 3.2-1815, the Irish Potato Board;
§§ 3.2-2200 through 3.2-2214, the Virginia Small Grains Board;
§§ 3.2-2700 through 3.2-2704D, the Virginia Marine Products Board;
§§ 3.2-2000 through 3.2-2009, the Virginia Pork Industry Board;
§§ 3.2-1601 through 3.2-1610, the Virginia Egg Board;
§§ 3.2-1300 through 3.2-1103, the Virginia Cattle Industry Board;
§§ 3.2-1400 through 3.2-1414, the Virginia Corn Board;
§§ 3.2-3000 through 3.2-3006, the Virginia Wine Board;
§§ 3.2-2100 through 3.2-2114, the Virginia Sheep Industry Board;
§§ 3.2-1500 through 3.2-1514, the Virginia Cotton Board.

Title 3.2, Chapter 47 mandates the marketing services of the Division of Marketing, which include all components of this activity.

Chapter 1 of Title 3.2 mandates the Equine Breeder Incentive Program.

Chapter 35 of Title 3.2 mandates the Farmers’ Market System.

Chapter 52 of Title 3.2 mandates the inspection of dairy facilities, the administration and enforcement of regulations adopted pursuant to this article, the inspection of certain milkfat testing equipment, the administration and enforcement of regulations adopted relative to the regulation of ice cream and similar products, and the licensing of creameries, plants and stations.

Chapter 5 of Title 3.2, Slaughterhouses, Meat, and Dressed Poultry.

Chapter 51 of Title 3.2, Virginia Food Law.

Chapter 65 of Title 3.2, Comprehensive Animal Care Laws authorizes the State Veterinarian to inspect animal shelters, pounds, boarding establishments, kennels, pet shops, dealers, exhibitors, or groomers to provide proper care and protection of animals, and mandates the State Veterinarian approve training for basic training for animal control officers and continuing education.

Chapter 60 of Title 3.2, Livestock and Poultry.

Chapter 59 of Title 3.2 mandates the establishment of the Office of the State Veterinarian and his assistants and Title 3.2, Chapter 60 mandates the State Veterinarian to protect domestic animals and poultry from disease.

Chapter 59 of Title 3.2 mandates the operation of a laboratory system for the diagnosis of diseases of livestock and poultry as well as for other purposes which may be determined by the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Specific sections of the Code of Virginia relating to agency programs are listed in each Service Area.

Charitable Gaming's statutory authority is provided in §18.2-340.15, et. Seq., Code of Virginia; §18.2-340.18 outlines the powers and duties of the Division while §18.2-340.19 defines the Charitable Gaming Board as a policy board that provides advice and promulgates regulations and rules for the Division to administer the audit, enforcement, and license functions. The Division is further governed by the charitable gaming rules and regulations (11 VAC 15.22) and the supplier rules and regulations (11 VAC 15.31).

Customers
Customer Group Customers served annually Potential customers annually
Ag/Forest Product Exporters 100 150
Agribusinesses, Ag Cooperatives and Membership Organizations 1,000 1,000
Agricultural Brokers 43 43
Beekeepers 100 800
Businesses selling retail packaged commodities 4,600 10,000
Businesses using weighing devices and scanners 10,000 25,000
Certified pesticide applicators, licensees, and products 34,000 40,500
Charitable organizations 17,148 25,000
Companies and citizens utilizing extended service contracts 170 250
Cotton Growers 400 750
Credit services businesses 2 10
Dairy farms producing Grade "A" or manufactured grade milk 742 742
Direct Marketers 700 1,700
Export Shipping Agents 10 10
Farm and Farm Related Employment 591,256 591,256
Federal agencies 3 3
Food Manufacturers, Warehouses & Processing Plants 2,462 2,803
General Public 9,283,702 10,400,482
Ginseng Growers/Dealers 8,000 10,000
Government agencies needing calibrated standards 100 200
Grade A milk tank truck wash station 2 3
Grain Dealers, Handlers and Grain/Soybean Export Facility 256 256
Health spas and health spa members 472 600
Legal services plan sellers 6,000 7,500
Licensed Agricultural Businesses 1,400 1,400
Licensed processors, distributors and producers 1,319 1,287
Livestock producers, dealers, markets 80,109 81,867
Manufacturers needing calibrated standards 200 600
Meat Processing/Slaughter Facilties & Employees 2,178 2,300
Membership campgrounds 6 10
Milk trucks & haulers 99 99
Nursery Dealers (Retailers) and Nursery Growers (Wholesalers) 725 2,075
Peanut Processing, Storage & Buying Stations 43 43
Permitted Charitable Gaming Organizations 555 605
Permitted Charitable Gaming Suppliers 22 32
Petroleum dealers using measuring devices 4,852 4,852
Potato & Vegetable Packinghouses 17 17
Pounds, shelters and local animal control agencies 216 225
Processed Food Companies 200 600
Producers 50,420 50,420
Property Developers 800 1,000
Public School Districts 132 136
Regional Food Banks 7 7
Registered Drivers (gallon measurement on pumps) 4,800,000 4,800,000
Retail Food Stores, Markets, Shops & Mobile Units 9,103 9,444
State & Local Governments 539 539
State or Private Schools 94 97
Travel clubs 3 10
Veterinary practitioners and clinics 3,948 5,063
Vineyards 100 200
Virginia farmers 47,383 47,383
Virginia School Children 635,582 654,650
Weights & Measures service agencies & technicians 2,025 2,500

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
[Nothing entered]

Partners
Partner Description
Environmental Protection Agency
United States Department of Agriculture
VDACS Consumer Advisory Council
Virginia Agribusiness Council
Virginia Commodity Associations
Virginia Cooperative Extension Service
Virginia Direct Marketing Association
Virginia Farm Bureau
Virginia State University
Virginia Tech
Virginia Veterinary Medical Association
Products and Services
  • Description of the Agency's Products and/or Services:
    Executive Direction and philosophy for the operation of the Department.

    Supports the direction of the Governor’s Office and the Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry.

    Responds to requests for information from legislative offices and citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    Strategic Planning. (Council on Virginia’s Future)

    Jobs created in the agribusiness industry; increased investment and income opportunities in agriculture by assisting Virginia firms with expansion or recruiting new firms to the state.

    Publications, news releases, print media, and broadcast media to increase public awareness of agency programs and services.

    Agency internet site – creation and maintenance.

    Reviews and promulgates state regulations pertaining to agriculture and consumer protection to meet the requirements of the Administrative Process Act.

    Responds to citizens' requests to the agency for information under the Virginia Freedom of Information Act.

    Processes and responds to complaints to the agency under the Agricultural Stewardship Act.

    Builds, maintains, and protects agency offices and laboratories.

    Emergency Response Training and Exercises: Training and exercises are coordinated for VDACS staff to enhance response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds. Examples of training and exercise topics include:
    • National Incident Management System
    • Incident Command System
    • Emergency Operations Center (VDACS responsibilities, and Task Management System)
    • Food Borne Illness Outbreak Response
    • Highly Contagious Livestock or Poultry Disease Outbreak Response
    • Plant Pest Outbreak Response

    Emergency Response Plans: Plans are coordinated and revised to respond to agency emergency responsibilities to provide:
    •Nutrition Assistance for Sheltered Virginians,
    • Animal/Zoonotic Disease, or Plant Pest Infestation Response, and
    • Food Safety and Food Security Services.

    Establishes and manages an annual milk production supply system that meets the need of fluid milk product demand of citizens in controlled markets.

    Establishes and announces advanced monthly producer prices for delivered milk production. A monthly price for non-fluid milk products is also established and announced.

    Licenses all processors, distributors, producer-distributors, and retailers marketing fluid milk products into Virginia controlled markets.

    Licensew producers who will produce and deliver raw milk to licensed processors supplying fluid milk products into Virginia controlled markets. Account for licensed producer’s production.

    Agriculture Product Promotion Services

    Assists Virginia exporters in marketing their products overseas.

    Assists agricultural and forest products producers, food processors, and industry organizations by initiating sales leads and participating and representing agricultural industries during trade shows, implementing retail and consumer promotions.

    Virginia Farmers Market System services small to medium size produce growers with state-owned shipping point market facilities for four state regions.

    Provides a complete and integrated marketing program for the livestock industry.

    Collects daily information on Virginia prices of agricultural commodities and publish and communicate this information through a number of mediums.

    Publishes unbiased, third party reports and analyses that assist agricultural producers.

    Marketing/market development activities.

    Inspection and official certification of product quality, according to USDA or Virginia grade standards, of the following:
    • Fruits & Vegetables
    • Peanuts
    • Grain
    • Poultry
    • Livestock

    Inspects grain testing equipment for accuracy.

    Provides marketing and technical assistance to grain producers.

    Plans and conducts grain grading workshops annually for growers, producers and processors.

    The Food Distribution Program manages the distribution of USDA donated foods to all eligible outlets in the state.

    Diverts USDA foods for emergency use after disasters or terrorism relief to assist state recovery operations.

    The Regional Animal Health Laboratory System offers diagnostic services to individual livestock and poultry producers, veterinary practitioners, and companion animal owners.

    Provide regulatory testing (brucellosis, Swine Pseudorabies, Johne’s disease, Equine infectious anemia, etc.) at the VDACS RAHLs so that producers can comply with state, federal and international requirements for sale or movement of animals and animal products.

    Regulatory testing is performed in support of the program in the Office of Dairy and Foods that permits interstate shipment of milk produced in Virginia and assures an unadulterated milk supply.

    Inspects livestock markets for compliance with sanitation requirements and records.

    Monitors health certificates, both issued and for imported livestock.

    Monitors equine events.

    Accredits new veterinarians to assure they are knowledgeable of state laws and regulations.

    Provides information for local governing bodies in regards to Comprehensive Animal Care Laws and animal welfare.

    Assists animal control officers in investigations.

    Provides technical expertise in the training/certification of animal control officers.

    Inspects livestock markets to assure compliance with animal welfare laws.

    Inspects animal pounds and shelters annually.

    Investigates complaints of animal care and/or cruelty.

    Enforces the Virginia Food Laws to protect the health and safety of every citizen in Virginia who consumes food products by ensuring that these foods are safe, wholesome, properly labeled and fit for human consumption.

    Inspects food manufacturing, food processing, food storage and retail food sales facilities for compliance with the Virginia Food Laws as well as all associated regulations .

    Inspects establishments that manufacture, store or sell dietary supplements to ensure sanitary conditions in those establishments as well as to affirm that dietary supplements reviewed are safe and properly labeled.

    Investigates consumer complaints relating to sanitation of food establishments and suspect food products purchased or consumed are investigated on an annual basis.

    Addresses possible food contamination arising from fires, floods, hurricanes, power outages, truck wrecks and terrorist events when and where the need arises.

    Enforces the Virginia Food Laws and associated regulations addressing sanitary conditions and practices within food establishments throughout the Commonwealth to ensure that food products are properly handled, processed, packaged, stored and transported.

    Investigates consumer complaints relating to alleged food-borne illness, adulteration of food products, labeling and advertising concerns, and establishment sanitation concerns.

    Performs evaluations of the adequacy of food security measures within food establishments on a continuous basis. Education and consultations regarding any needed enhancements of food security plans in place are provided when and where appropriate.

    The meat and poultry inspection program protects the safety of citizens in Virginia consuming meat products by ensuring the production of safe, wholesome, and truthfully labeled meat and poultry products, as well as humane treatment of the animals that are slaughtered.

    Performs ante and post mortem inspection on all animals presented for slaughter at inspected facilities. This inspection is required if the resulting product will be offered for sale.

    Both slaughter and processing plants must have acceptable written plans for sanitation and processing of products. The acceptability of the written plans, the ability of the plant operator to follow the written plan and the condition of the facilities are all subject to continuing inspection.

    Technical assistance is provided to persons wanting to enter the meat and poultry industry to help acquaint them with the legal requirements.

    Dairy Services protects the health and safety of every citizen in Virginia who consumes dairy food by ensuring that milk, ice cream and frozen desserts, cheese, butter and other dairy products are safe, wholesome, and fit for human consumption.

    Issues permits necessary to operate a dairy farm or dairy processing plant; frozen dessert manufacturers (in and out of state) and retail frozen dessert shops and mobile units.

    Provides direct services to clients by assisting them in identifying corrective actions necessary to comply with milk and dairy product quality standards.

    Uniform inspection and enforcement activities are conducted on facilities statewide to ensure milk and dairy products are properly handled, processed, packaged, stored and transported in a safe manner and to ensure a level playing field on which businesses may compete.

    Provides advice and assistance to dairy farmers, milk plants and dairy product processors to foster the quality of their products and their ultimate success. Provide a uniform regulatory environment and level playing field on which businesses may compete.

    Inspects and tests commercial feed, animal remedies, fertilizer and liming materials.

    Administration of the Virginia Seed Law.

    Prevents the establishment of or retards the spread of designated nuisance or injurious pests, or the introduction of new pests, using environmentally sound practices.

    Reduces the effects of nuisance and injurious pests (insects, plant diseases, and weeds) on the environment and their impact on consumers.

    Enhances the marketability of Virginia's agricultural commodities through pest-free certification of products for interstate and international trade.

    Protects existing plant and insect populations considered threatened or endangered.

    Promotes the science of beekeeping to ensure Virginia's growers of a continuing supply of healthy, managed pollinators.

    Regulatory Pest Control.

    Pest-free Certification.

    Plant Pest Assistance & Education.

    Threatened/Endangered Species provides registration of Virginia ginseng dealers and inspects/certifies ginseng to allow its sale and export. Reviews projects to ensure protection of state or federal threatened or endangered plant and insect species found in Virginia.

    Apiary Inspection .

    Protects consumers from fraud, deception, and illegal practices in the marketplace.

    Provides consumer counseling.

    Complaint referral and investigation related to the advertisement, sale, or lease of goods and services that are intended for personal, family or household use and consumer complaints regarding unfair, deceptive or illegal business practices.

    Alternative dispute resolution.

    Regulatory oversight of charitable solicitations, credit services businesses, extended service contracts, health spas, membership campgrounds, sellers of legal services plans, and travel clubs.

    Inspects and tests weighing and measuring devices.

    Enforcement of motor fuel quality standards.

    Calibration of measurement standards used by government and industry within the Commonwealth.

    Registration of retail petroleum locations for protection from franchise encroachment.

    Regulatory oversight of the production, sale and use of pesticides in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    Certifies individuals wishing to become pesticide applicators.

    Registration of Pesticides.

    Licenses pesticide businesses in order to ensure the proper sale, distribution, and application pesticides.

    Develops training and recertification courses for pesticide applicators.

    Charitable Gaming Licensing

    Charitable Gaming Management Training

    Charitable Gaming Inspections

    Enforcement & Investigations of Charitable Gaming Activities

    Charitable Gaming Audits
  • Factors Impacting Agency Products and/or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated Changes in Products or Services:
    [Nothing entered]
Finance
  • Financial Overview:
    VDACS funding comes from general funds (49%), user fees (21%), Commodity Grading Fees (9%), Commodity Board checkoff fees (7%) and federal funds (14%).
  • Financial Breakdown:
    FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $29,525,784  $28,961,479     $29,525,784  $28,961,479 
    Change To Base    -$811,256  $760,000     -$812,326  $760,000 
               
    Agency Total $28,714,528  $29,721,479     $28,713,458  $29,721,479 
    This financial summary is computed from information entered in the service area plans.
Human Resources
  • Overview
    As of July 1, 2009, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) had an authorized MEL of 519 with 450.5 filled and 59.5 vacant positions. In addition to the FTE’s, VDACS also employed 93 seasonal and wage employees.

    VDACS is organized into four divisions consisting of the Division of Animal and Food Industry Services, Division of Consumer Protection, Division of Charitable Gaming, and the Division of Marketing. The Commissioner's Office is comprised of the Offices of Administrative and Financial Services; Policy, Planning and Research; Agribusiness Development Services, Human Resources; Communications; Internal Audit; Milk Commission; and Emergency Management.

    The agency’s staff works in and out of its eight field offices; five regional diagnostic animal health laboratories located in Warrenton, Lynchburg, Ivor, Harrisonburg, and Wytheville; an international office in Hong Kong; and the VDACS headquarters in Richmond. The Richmond area has the largest concentration of VDACS employees with 44% working out of the central office, Consolidated Laboratories, or their home base. Approximately 7% work in the Tidewater area; 6% in Southside Virginia area; 3% in the Northern Virginia area; 3% in the Roanoke area; 2% in the Southwest Virginia area; 1% in the Charlottesville area and 1% in the Winchester area. The remaining 33% are working out of their homes throughout the state, outside the state and in Hong Kong.

    VDACS workforce is comprised of seven employee categories, as established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). These classifications are official/administrator, professional, technician, paraprofessional, office/clerical, skilled craft worker, and service/maintenance. VDACS uses 64 role codes with the largest population (79) in the Environmental Specialist I role code. The next highest populated role codes are Administrative and Office Specialist III (54), Agricultural Specialist IV (51), and Compliance Safety Officer III (44). The majority of the employees in the Environmental Specialist I and Compliance Safety Officer III work out of their home offices.
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date 7/1/2009    
    Total Authorized Position level 519    
    Vacant Positions -64    
    Current Employment Level 455.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled) 3    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled) 451    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled) 1    
    Faculty (Filled) 0    
    Wage 86    
    Contract Employees 1    
    Total Human Resource Level 542.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    Aging Workforce: VDACS is facing the challenge of losing many of our long-tenured staff to retirement between now and fiscal year 2012. Currently approximately 79 employees are eligible to retire and an additional 72 will be eligible within the next 5 years which is approximately 34% of the current workforce. Additionally, many of our current wage employees are former retirees who may not choose to continue working. This will result in a great loss of institutional knowledge, skills and experience. The agency’s median age as of July 1, 2009 is 47. Approximately 244 employees are age 50 and over; approximately 99 employees have over 25 years of state service which does not include additional purchased service and service converted from sick leave.

    Staff Retention: With an anticipated increase in turnover due to retirements, VDACS continues to explore avenues to improve staff retention. The issue of job satisfaction involves many factors, however VDACS’ ability to attract, recruit, and retain a qualified workforce is adversely impacted by agency salaries that are not competitive. In most cases, VDACS salaries are not market competitive when compared to the private sector, federal government and local government. This is particularly true for positions based in the Northern Virginia area. The lack of funding for the performance management system and salary increases has an impact on employee morale and our ability to retain younger workers. Additional funds for incentives such as recruitment bonuses, retention bonuses and performance bonuses are needed.

    Homeland Security Issues: With the additional workload as a result of homeland security issues, VDACS also needs to attract and retain employees with specialized skills and knowledge in food and dairy science, public health, veterinary medicine, microbiology, biology, pesticides, plant pathology, entomology, emergency preparedness, and law enforcement. Funds must be available to provide specialized training to keep up with the latest developments and technologies.

    Constant demand for additional services with less staff: Since 1991, VDACS’ maximum employment level has been reduced from 701 FTE’s to 519 FTE’s. Organizational units have been streamlined to the extent that there is very little back up for employees who are out on extended leave or for positions that are vacant.
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    Unfunded legislative requirements and mandates continue to drain agency resources. Changes in federal and state laws and regulations have the potential to change agency responsibilities and the continued downsizing of the federal government and local governments will potentially shift additional responsibilities to state agencies. Employee workloads are expected to increase without the benefit of increased resources.

    USDA is placing increased regulatory demand on VDACS to handle plant and animal health and disease issues. Homeland security programs are also increasing our workload and require intensified emergency preparedness and response capability as well as enhanced public information/education efforts.

    VDACS has the potential to lose up to one-third of its workforce over the next five years. Additional funds are necessary to provide technical, communication and management training. If the economy continues to decline, we may be forced to further reduce staffing levels. This creates morale issues as well as stress on employees that have to take on more duties and responsibilities. The projected retirements or loss of employees in technical and professional areas has the potential to create a shortage of expertise in critical areas. Resources are needed to provide creative outreach recruitment and retention incentives.
Information Technology
  • Current Operational IT Investments:
    The agency's current computer infrastructure is managed by the VITA / Northrop Grumman Partnership. The application environment consists of an obsolete IBM 9221 Model 150 mainframe computer running legacy applications using the Oracle version 7.3.3 Data Base Management System, and the related development tools and a Sun Solaris Unix environment running the Oracle 9i DBMS, the Oracle 9g development tools, and application server. Legacy applications on the mainframe are being converted the Oracle environment on Solaris. Migration to Sun Solaris running Oracle 11 DBMS and Oracle 10G application server is in progress. The infrastructure consists of a Novell Netware network with GroupWise email currently in migration to Windows Active Directory and MS Exchange, a Windows environment running a vendor-supplied Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS); and a vendor-supplied hardware/software environment running the vendor-provided Electronic Document Management System (EDMS). Agency Application Development staff have reengineered and enhanced approximately 90% of the Oracle version 7.33 applications. Conversion should be complete in FY2011. Additional agency applications exist on a Windows SQL Server platform. The current environment supports approximately 100 agency business applications.

    VDACS is working to convert four agricultural commodity applications from the mainframe to a web-enabled environment for internal use and to provide agency customers with a web-based payment portal for licensing and registration of products and businesses. While the web portal is still in the planning stages, the conversion to a new Oracle environment is in the early development phase. The application will potentially provide streamlined business processes for food safety, consumer protection and regulatory areas such as pesticide, feed, fertilizer, lime and motor fuel regulation.

    VDACS' network currently supports approximately 500 employees using services for email, virus protection, automatic virus definition updates, file sharing services, print services, Internet services and database connectivity. VDACS' servers currently reside at the Chesterfield Enterprise Service Center, connecting to the Oliver Hill Building, agency field offices and home-based offices via the VITA / NG maintained network, dial-up, and broadband connections to the Commonwealth of Virginia (COV) network. The network and equipment are the property of the VITA / Northrop Grumman Partnership and the partnership is responsible for their operation. Of the 550 computers at VDACS, approximately 250 are notebooks or tablets, mainly used in the field for tracking a variety of inspections, investigations, performing research, accessing VDACS and USDA database applications and communicating via email with VDACS, federal organizations and trade organizations.

    The 100 agency applications provide support to programs to ensure that the agency performance measures are met, including the Governor’s key measures to provide specific economic value to Virginia Agricultural products, ensure that Virginia is free of certain animal diseases, preserve farmland acreage, and that the Commonwealth complies with the Virginia Food Safety Code. The infrastructure services including email and Internet capability support these measures as well. If the application and infrastructure services fail to provide this support, VDACS will continue to provide the services but will be unable to effectively track, monitor and report on activities. Without these services, the agency volume of inspections, grading activities and complaints that can be processed will decrease and response to animal disease and food borne illnesses will be slower as fewer methods of communication will be available.

    The number of IT resources devoted to application support has decreased over the last five years, going from six to five developers. Database administration and Oracle engineering support resources have also been stretched. All IT staff has picked up additional duties which include IT security program and compliance, liaison activities with VITA, standard application training, tracking infrastructure requests and problems, tracking help desk issues, involvement in deploying agency application systems and complying with COV standards. Service for the infrastructure has become degraded, involving more IT staff time, more agency staff time, and longer times for resolution of requests and problems. In addition, there is a risk of increased errors due to the strain on agency resources.
  • Factors Impacting the Current IT:
    Primary constraints continue to be lack of funding and lack of staff availability. Staff time required to support current applications and changes needed by program areas leaves minimal time for conversion efforts and for the migration effort to a supported Oracle platform. The inclusion of the Division of Charitable Gaming in VDACS added three major applications to the agency for which agency IT staff has no expertise. New skills are needed to support these applications although training dollars are minimal. The agency security program resources are further being stretched due to emergency management requirements and more stringent Commonwealth security standards.

    Over the last biennium, IT staff spent a significant amount of time redesigning the Office of Consumer Affairs Complaint system, implementing the Weights and Measures Inspections system, and preparing for a web-facing Virginia Grown application. These efforts are just an example of the agency's need to move forward to provide agency programs with more efficient and effective tools to provide constituents with better quality service. Charitable Gaming Pull Tab regulation is another area of opportunity for VDACS to make use of technology for regulatory needs.

    VITA transition activities have significantly increased the amount of staff resources necessary to complete the move to the COV messaging system, network, help desk, desktop computer, and server environments. Staff resources to meet the ever-changing COV IT and Information Security requirements in policies, standards and procedures have become a hardship to VDACS. In addition to the drain on resources, deficiencies exist in the hardware and software standards set by the partnership. One example is that MS Office versions in use are older than those required by VDACS’ USDA counterparts. While the partnership with the Commonwealth and Northrop Grumman provides infrastructure services, many of the duties performed by infrastructure staff prior to the partnership have now become agency responsibilities. IT staff levels have not increased to meet these additional demands. Additionally, delays in receiving new services that are in scope to VITA have been a hindrance to completing projects on time since 2006.

    Commonwealth-wide budget reductions, the lack of resources and degradation in infrastructure services has caused project delays for the Weights and Measures System and the Animal Health Records System. VDACS is also at risk for major outages because of unsupported Oracle versions running in production and no current disaster recovery service offerings by the partnership.
  • Proposed IT Solutions:
    Provide all agency employees with access to all information technology and network services.

    Increase agency productivity by enhancing technology capabilities and e-government initiative, especially in the areas of permitting and licensing services.

    Provide the inspection staffs with the electronic tools for recording inspections, management reporting, and customer reporting to enhance productivity, improve customer service, and streamline business processes. The tools include expanding network services to field staff so that more reporting will be accomplished electronically and systems implemented can be accessed remotely.

    Respond to growth in consumer demand for services, industry demand for services and growth in the number of regulated entities in the areas of Food Safety, Marketing, Veterinary Services, Consumer Affairs, Product and Industry Standards, Laboratory Services, Plant and Pest Services and Charitable Gaming Services.

    Complete the update of legacy mainframe applications to current technologies. Retire the outdated mainframe.

    Investigate new technologies to provide VDACS with content (document) management support and to provide VDACS with on-line customer services (for information, forms, payments, licensing and registrations).

    Increase compliance with Commonwealth IT and Information Security standards providing increased security, standardization, and project management, providing better quality and more secure systems within the agency.

    There are currently no major 2010-12 projects. All projects in progress are below the non-major threshold, but small projects are in progress, including the Food Safety and Inspection System, and the Agriculture Commodity Licensing and Product Registration System.

    The changes necessary in IT affect all lines of business in the agency. They are important because they will increase operational efficiencies and add value to the Commonwealth by increasing services to citizens. The changes meet federal, state and regulatory mandates while incorporating an easy to use web-facing experience for our customers in addition to providing faster turnaround on services offered by the agency. In addition, the improvements will allow the agency to maximize the effectiveness of the agency's human resources.
  • Current IT Services:

    Estimated Ongoing Operations and Maintenance Costs for Existing IT Investments

    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Projected Service Fees $1,594,221 $123,167 $1,618,135 $125,014
    Changes (+/-) to VITA
    Infrastructure
    $80,000 $20,000 $80,000 $20,000
    Estimated VITA Infrastructure $1,674,221 $143,167 $1,698,135 $145,014
    Specialized Infrastructure $35,000 $0 $35,000 $0
    Agency IT Staff $695,000 $85,000 $695,000 $85,000
    Non-agency IT Staff $60,000 $0 $60,000 $0
    Other Application Costs $573,000 $203,000 $573,000 $203,000
    Agency IT Current Services $3,037,221 $431,167 $3,061,135 $433,014
    Comments:
    Infrastructure increase due to new servers for LIMS, backup costs, storage costs and DR costs
  • Proposed IT Investments

    Estimated Costs for Projects and New IT Investments

    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Major IT Projects $0 $0 $0 $0
    Non-major IT Projects $0 $0 $0 $0
    Agency-level IT Projects $230,000 $130,000 $240,000 $140,000
    Major Stand Alone IT Procurements $0 $0 $0 $0
    Non-major Stand Alone IT Procurements $80,000 $20,000 $80,000 $20,000
    Total Proposed IT Investments $310,000 $150,000 $320,000 $160,000
  • Projected Total IT Budget
    Cost - Year 1 Cost - Year 2
    General Fund Non-general Fund General Fund Non-general Fund
    Current IT Services $3,037,221 $431,167 $3,061,135 $433,014
    Proposed IT Investments $310,000 $150,000 $320,000 $160,000
    Total $3,347,221 $581,167 $3,381,135 $593,014
Appendix A - Agency's information technology investment detail maintained in VITA's ProSight system.
Capital
  • Current State of Capital Investments:
    VDACS owns fifteen office, laboratory and farmers' market facilities at thirteen locations across the Commonwealth. Addtionally, the Agency leases thirteen office, laboratory and storage facilities.

    VDACS must maintain a fleet of trucks and other vehicles not available from the State Motor Pool for its inspection and grading activities. Livestock Marketing and Weights and Measures Inspection are examples of two program areas that require special vehicles to perform their activities.

    The Commonwealth invested approximately $12 million planning and constructing farmers' market facilities in Accomack, Carroll, Southampton and Westmoreland Counties. These markets are operated by private sector or local government entities via a contract with VDACS. The Commonwealth is responsible for repair and replacement of building systems including refrigeration equipment, fire suppression and alarm system water supply systems, paving and structural systems. The Department's maintenance budget does not contain sufficient funding to address the projected repair needs. Traditionally, the Commonwealth's Maintenance Reserve Program has not provided sufficient funding to maintain these markets. These markets are between eleven and seventeen years old and are beginning to require costly repairs. During the FY 2008-2010 biennium, the agency did receive sufficient maintenance reserve funding. This level of maintenance reserve funding is needed in the 2010-2012 biennium to properly maintain these aging markets and older office buildings on the Eastern Shore.

    The agency's larger animal diagnostic laboratories (Warrenton, Wytheville, Lynchburg, Harrisonburg) need full time trades technicians to address daily facility maintenance issues. Due to the size and complexity of these facilities, a full time technician is needed to handle electrical, mechanical, and janitorial problems and workload. The agency does not have the appropriated funding or positions available to meet this need, therefore wage employees are hired to fill the void. Constant turnover of wage employees leads to high administrative costs to find various maintenance engineers and janitorial staff to fill the void and to constantly hire and train new employees. The employees we hire are generally trained by us only to leave for full time jobs.

    The agency finished constructing a new office and laboratory in Harrisonburg, Virginia during the previous biennium. Certificate of Use and Occupancy was issued on October 23, 2008. The new facility includes a 13,800 square foot regional laboratory facility, 11,800 square foot regional office building, 470 square foot maintenance building and installation of associated equipment.

    The animal diagnostic laboratories have animal waste incinerators. The incinerators require constant repair due to their age. The agency installed a new large capacity, 600 pound per hour incinerator at the Harrisonburg Laboratory and a new 300 pound per hour capacity incinerator at the Wytheville Laboratory. The incinerators are necessary to properly dispose of animal waste; however, they are costly to operate from an energy prospective.
  • Factors Impacting Capital Investments:
    As with most state entities, funding is not sufficient to properly maintain our captial assets. Maintenance costs are usually deferred to future years.

    The agency requested VPBA funds for 2008-10 biennium to build a Marketing & Inspection Office on the Eastern Shore. The project was funded by the 2008 General Assembly. A project bid advertisement date of October 2009 is anticipated, with construction start (notice to proceed) scheduled for January 2010. The proposed facility will replace agency offices now located in two separate facilities that are in need of major renovation and/or replacement. Renovations needed included roofing, heating and air conditioning, and electrical systems. Current office space is inadequate for assigned staff and no conference and training space is available. The office will be located with the farmers' market on the Eastern Shore. This project has been an agency capital budget priority since the 1990-92 biennium.

    The agency requested VPBA funds for 2008-10 to build a seafood facility on the Eastern Shore. This project was funded by the 2008 General Assembly. A project bid advertisement date of October 2009 is anticipated, with construction start (notice to proceed) scheduled for January 2010. The seafood processing and storage facility will be used to market, handle, store, and freeze seafood. This project will increase the value and marketing of fish and/or finfish currently harvested from the waters surrounding this area.

    The agency requested VPBA funds for the 2010-12 biennium to expand and renovate the Ivor Regional Laboratory and Office. The project would include a new necropsy lab with built-in cooler space and a new animal waste incinerator. Three thousand square feet of office space would consolidate offices and eliminate lease space in Franklin, VA. The present necropsy room and cooler are too small to accommodate large animals.

    The agency requested VPBA funds for the 2010-12 biennium to build and relocate the Warrenton Regional Office. The proposed project will include site studies, planning and construction of a 6,000 square foot office building at the site of the regional diagnostic laboratory in Warrenton, Virginia. The existing regional office facility is on a valuable commercial site that can be sold after construction of the new facility to offset approximately 70% of the project cost. Construction of the new facility will allow consolidation of all agency functions in the Warrenton Region at one location resulting in better access and service to clients and more efficient building operation and maintenance.

    The agency requested VPBA funds for the 2010-12 biennium to provide backup facilities electrical generators to strengthen the Agency’s capacity to operate in accordance with our Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) in the event of a natural or manmade disaster and to continue support of the agricultural industry during a crisis. The regional animal health laboratory system in Virginia consists of five laboratories. Each of these facilities is responsible for diagnostic and regulatory testing that supports the agricultural and veterinary communities across the Commonwealth. For that reason, emergency power supplies are crucial to operating these facilities in a time of crisis. Natural or man-made disasters could render these facilities useless without a power supply for lights, electronic equipment, and laboratory testing equipment. Backup generators to supply basic electric power needs are the best way to accomplish this important safeguard.
  • Capital Investments Alignment:
    Agency facilities are maintained and protected at acceptable standards and operational down-time is virtually non-existent.

    The five animal diagnostic laboratories are located strategically around Virginia to meet the needs of producers, veterinarian practitioners, farmers, agribusinesses, and meat and poultry companies. Necropsies and pathology, serology, diagnostic bacteriology and dairy bacteriology test are performed to diagnose animal diseases and to protect the food and dairy supply. These locations are: Ivor, Wytheville, Warrenton, Harrisonburg, and Lynchburg. The new Harrisonburg Laboratory is capable of testing at Bio-Security Level III.

    Offices in the laboratories, or at the same location, make it possible for employees in the Divisions of Marketing, Consumer Protection and Animal and Food Industry Services to service the agency's clients at and near those locations. Staff in these locations, in addition to laboratory staff, include: fruit and vegetable, livestock, and poultry graders; veterinary services staff; marketing staff; food, dairy, and meat and poultry inspectors; market news reporters; nursery inspectors, etc.

    Office locations are also in Suffolk, Franklin, on the Eastern Shore, and Roanoke. These smaller offices house a variety of employees to serve our customers and meet our mission in those areas.

    The farmers' markets provide a means for local farmers and producers to package, market and ship their crops. Products are hydro cooled (if appropriate), graded, boxed, and cooled. Farmers are able to join with other growers to develop a shipment large enough to sell to grocery chains. Independently, these farmers would not have enough product to gain access to these markets.
Agency Goals

Goal 1

Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.

Goal Summary and Alignment

Promoting the growth, profitability and continued viability of Virginia’s agriculture industry provides opportunities for business advancement and economic development. Increasing the profitability of Virginia agriculture also provides an opportunity to protect and conserve our natural resources. This goal aligns with the economic long-term objective as well as the long-term objective on natural, historic, and cultural resources.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Goal 2

Ensure a safe and wholesome food supply.

Goal Summary and Alignment

An integrated system of food safety inspection and testing is implemented to ensure that Virginia continues to have high food safety standards. These standards enable the public to enjoy quality, safe and wholesome food that enhances the well being of Virginia citizens, the environment and the economy. This goal aligns with the Council on Virginia's Future goals on health and family and public safety.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Protect the public’s safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
Goal 3

Provide agricultural and consumer protection services that support economic growth, meet consumer needs, and encourage environmental stewardship.

Goal Summary and Alignment

By providing agricultural and consumer protection services that support economic growth, meet consumer needs and encourage environmental stewardship, the department promotes a balanced and reasonable approach to regulations, which protects the public’s interest and supports economic growth. These efforts continue to advance Virginia’s objective of being a national leader in the enhancement of our economy and engaging and informing citizens to ensure we serve their interests.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Engage and inform citizens to ensure we serve their interests.
Goal 4

Enhance Agency services and productivity through new technology, e-government applications, work processes and procedures, and training.

Goal Summary and Alignment

Through the integration and maintenance of new technology and e-government applications, streamlined work processes and procedures, and training, the department is able to operate more efficiently and enhance service levels both internally and externally, while making the most prudent use of tax dollars. This aligns with Virginia’s commitment to remaining the best managed state in the nation.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation.
Goal 5

Provide services that prevent or minimize the impact of emergency agricultural infestations, animal disease outbreaks, foodborne illness outbreaks, and natural and manmade disasters.

Goal Summary and Alignment

By instituting measures that improve our emergency response capacity, the department is able to help minimize the impact to citizens and reduce economic losses to Virginia businesses. Providing services that help to protect public safety and security will improve the quality of life for all Virginians. This goal aligns with the public safety and economic goals of the Council on Virginia’s Future.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Elevate the levels of educational preparedness and attainment of our citizens.
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Protect the public’s safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
Goal 6

We will strengthen the culture of preparedness across state agencies, their employees and customers.

Goal Summary and Alignment

This goal ensures compliance with federal and state regulations, policies and procedures for Commonwealth preparedness, as well as guidelines promulgated by the Assistant to the Governor for Commonwealth Preparedness, in collaboration with the Governor's Cabinet, the Commonwealth Preparedness Working Group, the Department of Planning and Budget and the Council on Virginia's Future. The goal supports achievement of the Commonwealth's statewide goal of protecting the public's safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.

Goal Alignment to Statewide Goals
  • Elevate the levels of educational preparedness and attainment of our citizens.
  • Be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
  • Protect the public’s safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
Goal Objectives
  • We will be prepared to act in the interest of the citizens of the Commonwealth and its infrastructure during emergency situations by actively planning and training both as an agency and as individuals.
    Objective Strategies
    • The agency Emergency Coordination Officer will stay in regular communication with the Office of Commonwealth Preparedness and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and other Commonwealth Preparedness Working Group agencies.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Agency Preparedness Assessment Score
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Measure Baseline Value:
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: FY 2009 Agency Preparedness Assessment Results (% out of 100)

      Data Source and Calculation: The Agency Preparedness Assessment is an all-hazards assessment tool that measures agencies' compliance with requirements and best practices. The assessment has components including Physical Security, Continuity of Operations, Information Security, Vital Records, Fire Safety, Human Resources, Risk Management and Internal Controls, and the National Incident Management System (for Virginia Emergency Respose Team - VERT - agencies only).


Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 1 of 26
Distribution of USDA Donated Food (301 457 08)
Description

The Food Distribution Program manages the distribution of USDA donated foods to all eligible outlets in the state.

This activity performs the following activities:
•Approves non-school outlets for participation
•Orders USDA foods based on USDA foods offered, school food requests or clients served
•Arranges transportation and storage, maintains accountability of USDA foods
•Ensures that USDA donated food usage is in accordance with federal regulations. The staff provides technical assistance in program operation and promotes Virginia products to recipient agencies and commercial distributors. This office also diverts USDA foods in emergencies for disaster relief, including potential terrorist attacks, to assist state recovery operations.

Currently, there are three components to this activity which are interrelated and generate economies of scale because they utilize the same personnel and a single commercial distribution system:

The largest component to Virginia citizens is USDA foods for school lunches. The program benefits state taxpayers by reducing the cost of school meals by 20.75 cents each. Virginia schools serve 108.1 million meals annually. This component provides the initial shelf stable food resources for state recovery operations from disasters or emergencies including terrorist attacks. In the event of state emergencies, disasters, or terrorist attacks, VDACS can also coordinate the diversion of USDA foods from a variety of sources.

The second component is The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). VDACS distributes foods donated by USDA to seven regional food banks for subsequent distribution to low income households. VDACS also distributes TEFAP foods to eligible soup kitchens/congregate feeding sites in Virginia.

The third component is the distribution of USDA foods to public and private nonprofit institutions. USDA foods provided to state and local penal institutions reduce the food cost burden to the economic benefit of Virginia taxpayers.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area aligns with the VDACS mission to enhance opportunities for the growth and profitability of the Virginia agriculture industry. The activity promotes economic opportunities for Virginia producers (farmers), processors and distributors who warehouse USDA foods in conjunction with their commercial food sales to these outlets. The total value of all USDA foods distributed in Virginia was $34.2 million in fiscal year 2008. This service area also plays a vital role in promoting healthy lives by providing nutritious, low/no-cost meals for food program participants.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Receipt of USDA donated foods (and the accompanying federal grants) is contingent upon the state entering into a federal/state agreement (FNS 74) with USDA. The agreement designates the state agency that will administer specific USDA donated food programs. The state distributing agency must adhere to the federal regulations from the specific Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 235, 250 and 251 that govern state administration of donated food programs.

    §§3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708 of the Code of Virginia authorizes the Division of Marketing and its activities in general, which include the administration of the Food Distribution Program and cooperation with USDA, to administer this program in Virginia.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
General Public Clients served by charitable & correctional institutions 40,808 46,104
General Public Households 656,444 705,000
General Public Institutions 124 139
Public School Districts Public School Districts 132 132
Regional Food Banks Regional Food Banks 6 6
State or Private Schools State or Private Schools 87 97
General Public Summer camps and summer feeding programs 134 140
Virginia School Children Virginia School Children 600,853 1,100,000

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
Virginia schools spent $1.2 million of their entitlement dollars on fresh fruits and vegetables through one contracted produce vendor in the state. With new USDA guidelines, the potential for increased sales of fruits and vegetables through commercial produce vendors in the state will continue to increase.

Increased eligible households that receive USDA donated food under TEFAP, increased by 50% and the potential for that figure will continue to increase as long as the economy continues to be depressed.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    None.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    A new pilot processing program, net off invoice, is being offered to schools in Region I for the 2009/10 school year. Schools will be able to purchase snacks made by J&J Snack Company and sold through commercial distributors. If the pilot is successful, the program will be expanded to statewide coverage and include other processing companies. This will have potential to increase sales for commercial distributors across the state.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Distribute USDA donated foods to eligible outlets in the state.
    • Approve non-school outlets for participation.
    • Order USDA foods based on clients served, USDA foods offered and school food requests.
    • Arrange transportation/storage, & maintain accountability of USDA foods.
    • Divert USDA foods for emergency use after disasters or terrorism relief to assist state recovery operations.
    • Ensure that USDA donated food usage is in accordance with federal regulations.
    • Award state contracts to commercial food distributors to receive, store and distribute USDA foods to outlets specified by VDACS.
    • Expand opportunities for Virginia’s producers and processors in the marketing of agricultural products to schools and institutions.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
    Base Budget $330,244 $1,750,444    $330,244 $1,750,444
    Change To Base -$4,858 $0    -$4,858 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $325,386  $1,750,444     $325,386  $1,750,444 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Increase the value of USDA donated food distributed to eligible recipient agencies in order to maximize the nutritional benefits for Virginia citizens.
    Objective Description
    This objective provides for improved nutritional health and well being of the Commonwealth's school children; improved food security and nutrition assistance to needy citizens and economic benefits to agricultural producers, processors and distributors. The program provides a viable mechanism for food assistance to citizens in the event of a state of emergency resulting from natural or man made disasters.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.
      Comment: Distribution of USDA donated foods supports, Enhancing Economic Development, especially the objective to expand opportunities in the marketing of agricultural products to schools and institutions. Last year, USDA purchased $13.4 million worth of products from Virginia agricultural firms for delivery to food assistance program outlets. In addition to those direct beneficiaries that receive USDA foods, agriculture producers are served when commodity prices are stabilized by USDA purchases of foods allowing sufficient return on investment to maintain production. This objective also aligns with the long term objective toward healthy lives and strong and resilient families.
    Objective Strategies
    • Offer, allocate and distribute USDA-donated foods to eligible recipient agencies in order to enhance sales of Virginia products through June 30, 2012.
    • Make trade calls to schools and institutions to increase the use of Virginia food products through June 30, 2012.
    • Expand marketing activity with institutional buyers in Virginia, increase Virginia market share through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide consistent support for expanding USDA/DOD Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program with public schools through June 30, 2012.
    • Maintain working relationships with commercial distributors to enhance food distribution programs through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) donated food distributed within the state per federal guidelines.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Distributed 100% of all donated food allocated to Virginia in FY07.

      Measure Target Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Maintain 100% of distribution of USDA food allocated to Virginia.

      Data Source and Calculation: USDA database



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 2 of 26
Animal Disease Prevention and Control (301 531 01)
Description

A statewide veterinary medicine regulatory program which prevents, contains, and eradicates infectious and contagious diseases of Virginia’s livestock and poultry populations in order to enhance their national and international marketability and to increase the profit potential for the animal agriculture industry.

Services include:

Health tests and certification to assure that livestock and poultry are free of diseases when they are sold or shipped.

Analyzing the state’s livestock population through continuous monitoring and testing at livestock markets and shows.

Coordination of animal and poultry disease eradication programs.

Investigations of drug residue cases and tracebacks associated with suspect animals.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Promotes the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture by protecting livestock and poultry from disease, ensures a safe and wholesome food supply and protects citizens from zoonotic diseases.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Title 3.2, Chapter 60 Livestock and Poultry.

    §3.2-5901 mandates the establishment of the Office of the State Veterinarian and his assistants.

    §3.2-6000 through §3.2-6017 mandates the State Veterinarian to protect domestic animals and poultry from disease.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock dealers 230 300
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock markets 29 35
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Cattle 25,200 26,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Equine 41,000 45,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Goats 3,934 4,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Poultry 5,283 6,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Sheep 1,800 2,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Swine 800 900
Veterinary practitioners and clinics Veterinary practices 913 950
Veterinary practitioners and clinics Veterinary practitioners 2,482 2,600

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
None.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    Changing personnel in management positions.

    Loss of personnel due to position losses as a result of budget reductions.

    Increased demand for time to respond to citizen concerns about animal welfare and animal cruelty without a subsequent increase in staff.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    Live Bird Market operations may require additional time for regulatory inspections.

    Livestock market inspections may decrease due to personnel shortages.

    Increased amount of time required for emergency preparedness and disease planning without subsequent increase in staff.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Customer assistance: consult with producers on animal health issues; assist veterinarians participating in the Virginia Johne’s Disease Control and Prevention Program.
    • Inspection and enforcement: inspect livestock markets for compliance with sanitation requirements and records; perform garbage inspections to assure proper disposal of garbage and eliminate the risk of feeding to swine; conduct dealer inspections; monitor health certificates, both issued and for imported livestock; monitor equine events; monitor brucellosis and tuberculosis test results; assist with follow-up testing when necessary for brucellosis and tuberculosis.
    • Accreditation/Certification: accredit new veterinarians to assure they are knowledgeable of state laws and regulations; certify veterinarians for participation in the Voluntary Johne’s Program.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
    Base Budget $1,883,400 $1,312,589    $1,883,400 $1,312,589
    Change To Base -$61,121 $0    -$61,121 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $1,822,279  $1,312,589     $1,822,279  $1,312,589 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Protect and enhance the economic viability of Virginia's agriculture industries through the prevention and management of foreign and emerging animal and poultry diseases of economic and public health significance.
    Objective Description
    To protect and promote Virginia's animal agriculture industries by conducting livestock market and sales inspections, reviewing and issuing animal health certificates; conducting investigations and tracebacks; issuing quarantines and eradication notices; maintaining Virginia's Tuberculosis, Brucellosis and Pseudorabies free status; and enforcing livestock and poultry regulations and entry requirements on a continuous basis. The program must be proactive as well as maintain ongoing activities to assure that animal diseases are not introduced into the Commonwealth that could have a negative economic impact. Plans must be in place to minimize the economic impact of an introduced disease or natural disasters that may occur.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Provide services that prevent or minimize the impact of emergency agricultural infestations, animal disease outbreaks, foodborne illness outbreaks, and natural and manmade disasters.
      Comment: Aligns with long term objective #7 - Protects the public's safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
    Objective Strategies
    • The State Veterinarian will continue to work with various sectors in the livestock industry to develop and implement a voluntary animal identification and premise registration program in Virginia, contingent on funding for such a program, through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will continue to review and improve the Highly Contagious Livestock and Poultry Disease Emergency Operations Plan and the Avian Influenza Rapid Response Plan, and to exercise strategic portions of the plans, including exercises utilizing GIS maps and quarantine enforcement with law enforcement officers, through June 30, 2012.
    • The State Veterinarian will evaluate the quality of the producer information available through livestock market and registered cattle dealers and develop a plan to track cattle marketed through Virginia livestock markets and registered cattle dealers depending on available funding through June 30, 2012.
    • The State Veterinarian will develop a protocol for livestock market and livestock dealer animal tracing for use in responses to regulatory program or foreign animal diseases through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will train veterinarians through the USDA Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostician Course through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will conduct joint VDACS, VMRCVM staff and veterinary practitioner training and a foreign animal disease exercise by June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will participate in the Virginia Poultry Disease Task Force, the Delmarva Poultry Industry Emergency Disease Task Force and seek to maintain a strong working relationship with poultry producers throughout Virginia through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will provide technical and professional information to the VDACS Emergency Services Coordinator to assist in the development of an emergency response plan to address the needs of individuals with household pets and service animals in the event of a disaster through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will develop an Emergency Operations Plan for Highly Contagious Equine Diseases by June 30, 2012.
    • The State Veterinarian will participate on the State Animal Response Team board of directors to develop and implement plans for state and local volunteer responses to animal emergencies through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of livestock premises registered through the animal identification program in Virginia.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up
      Measure Baseline Value:
      2142
      Date:
      6/30/2007

      Measure Baseline Description: 2142 livestock premises were registered in FY 2007.

      Measure Target Value:
      10500
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Register 10500 livestock premises in Virginia by June 30, 2010.

      Data Source and Calculation: Premises registration through the National Animal Identification System.

  • Protect and enhance the economic viability of Virginia's agriculture industries through the prevention and management of foreign and emerging animal and poultry diseases of economic and public health significance.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Provide agricultural and consumer protection services that support economic growth, meet consumer needs, and encourage environmental stewardship.
    Objective Strategies
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will train, certify or recertify additional staff and field veterinarians through other USDA courses on Brucellosis Epidemiology, Tuberculosis Epidemiology, Johne’s Disease, Scrapie, Live Bird Marketing System, Generic Database, Swine Health, Transmissible Encephalopathies and Animal Identification as these courses and funding are made available by the USDA through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services and the Office of Laboratory Services will coordinate with the Virginia Department of Health and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries on diseases of mutual concern through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will expand training and information exchange for regional veterinary supervisors and selected staff by conducting quarterly regional meetings through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will work with USDA and Virginia Cooperative Extension to educate beef and dairy producers on the need for and the benefit of participation in the Virginia Johne's Disease Control Program through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will support livestock marketing by inspecting, monitoring, auditing and disinfecting livestock markets; by monitoring livestock dealers, records and registrations; by maintaining the Cattle Brand Registration program; by monitoring for humane handling of livestock at livestock markets; and by ensuring compliance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will ensure compliance with state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to animal movement, animal transport and disease control by inspecting and/or monitoring equine events, county and state fairs, shows, exhibitions, sales and other animal gatherings through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will participate in all state and federal programs, and ensure compliance with all federal and state laws and regulations to maintain Virginia's Tuberculosis-free, Brucellosis-free and Pseudorabies-free status through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will support Virginia’s poultry industry and reduce the potential for highly contagious poultry diseases by monitoring, testing and auditing the commercial and non-commercial poultry flocks in the state; by participating in the National Poultry Improvement Plan, the Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza program, and the Live Bird Market System program; by issuing importation permits and monitoring the importation of hatching eggs and poultry into the state; and by inspecting feed and farm stores for the presence and sale of poultry through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will work to prevent the incursion of Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) by inspecting quarantine facilities, by monitoring testing for the causative organism and by monitoring quarantines placed on horses imported into Virginia from countries known to have CEM through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will promote programs and ensure compliance with federal and state laws and regulations that help control diseases of economic concern to Virginia's animal agriculture such as Scrapie, Johne's Disease, Equine Infectious Anemia, Avian Influenza, Pullorum, Fowl Typhoid and other infectious or contagious diseases as they may occur through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will monitor and conduct investigations into violations of state import and export regulations and monitor, approve and conduct investigations into violations of the issuance of Certificates of Veterinary Inspections through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will conduct the orientation training for private practitioners to allow them to become federally accredited to do regulatory animal disease testing and to write Certificates of Veterinary Inspection through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will conduct Market Cattle Investigations, drug residue violation investigations, and other animal health and animal welfare investigations as authorized by state and federal laws and regulations through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will approve and monitor the use of veterinary biologicals and veterinary vaccines in Virginia through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will contact restaurants, nursing homes, schools, airports and other garbage generating facilities to ensure compliance with the state and federal garbage feeding laws through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Maintain Virgina''s Tuberculosis-, Brucellosis- and Pseudorabies-free status
      Measure Class:
      Agency Key
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2007

      Measure Baseline Description: Disease-free status maintained in FY 2007.

      Measure Target Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2010

      Measure Target Description: Disease-free status. (100%)

      Data Source and Calculation: Monitor through surveillance of livestock population and laboratory tests.

  • Prevent the rapid spread of transmissible disease in Virginia’s livestock and poultry populations by enhancing disease surveillance capabilities.
    Objective Description
    2 VAC 5-30 Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Reporting Requirements for Contagious and Infectious Diseases of Livestock and Poultry in Virginia requires regular reporting on the occurrence of certain diseases to the Office of the State Veterinarian. The old system of paper reports has been inadequate, and an effort is being made to implement an internet-based disease reporting system for veterinary practitioners.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Provide services that prevent or minimize the impact of emergency agricultural infestations, animal disease outbreaks, foodborne illness outbreaks, and natural and manmade disasters.
      Comment: Aligns with long term objective #7 - Protects the public's safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
    Objective Strategies
    • Promote use of online disease reporting system to private veterinary practitioners through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of private veterinary practitioners utilizing the online disease reporting system.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Quarterly
      Preferred Trend:
      Up

      Frequency Comment: Once disease reporting system is established, reports will be available.

      Measure Baseline Value:
      165
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: At the end of FY 09, 165 practitioners were utilizing the online disease reporting system.

      Measure Target Value:
      258
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Increase participation by 25 percent each year of the biennium.

      Data Source and Calculation: Online access to disease reporting system will allow for data calculation, including number of users, and compliance with reporting requirement.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 3 of 26
Diagnostic Services (301 531 02)
Description

The Regional Animal Health Laboratory System (RAHLS) consists of five regional animal health laboratories geographically distributed around the Commonwealth such that all potential clients are within two to three hours of at least one facility.

Diagnostic services provides necropsy (animal autopsy), diagnostic microbiology, dairy microbiology, parasitology, serology, molecular testing, histopathology and food safety testing.

Customer service is enhanced by each facility being staffed with professional personnel to provide the highest quality of veterinary laboratory diagnostic services directly to the client.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    The regional animal health laboratory system assists the citizens of Virginia by providing veterinary and food safety diagnostic services that align with the Agency’s mission of promoting the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Title 3.2, Chapter 60 Livestock and Poultry, Section 3.2-5903 mandates the operation of a laboratory system for the diagnosis of diseases of livestock and poultry as well as for other purposes which may be determined by the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

    In addition, testing is performed that supports the Virginia Meat and Poultry Products Inspection Act; in support of regulations pertaining to disease monitoring and control administered by the Office of Veterinary Services; and regulations governing the production, handling and processing of milk for manufacturing purposes and establishing minimum standards for certain dairy products to be used for human food.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Agribusinesses, Ag Cooperatives and Membership Organizations Agribusiness Companies 100 125
Federal agencies Federal agencies 3 3
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers 20,000 20,000
State & Local Governments Local Animal Control Agencies 216 216
State & Local Governments Other State Agencies 5 5
State & Local Governments Other VDACS Programs 2 2
Veterinary practitioners and clinics Veterinary practitioners and clinics 700 800

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
As with agriculture in general, over time there has been and will continue to be fewer traditional livestock producers, but this has been more than offset by an increase in law enforcement work (animal control agencies), food safety (USDA, FDA, Office of Dairy & Foods, Office of Meat & Poultry Services), exotic and companion animals, Virginia Department of Health (arbovirus surveillance) and non-traditional livestock producers (camelids, goats, aquaculture). Because of these services, potentially every citizen of the Commonwealth is a customer.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    Submissions are generated by the livestock and poultry producers and their veterinarians, so the volume of submissions is somewhat variable, depending on the overall animal agriculture economy.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    As the types of diagnostic testing available become more varied and sophisticated (e.g. molecular or “DNA” testing), the value of such testing also rises to producers.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Animal Diagnostic Testing Services: The RAHLS offers diagnostic services to individual livestock and poultry producers, veterinary practitioners, and companion animal owners. Some of these services are not available on a routine basis from any other source. Virginia livestock and poultry producers benefit by having convenient, economical, expert advice on contagious diseases which can lead to losses through death and/or reduced productivity of animals. Non-agricultural residents of the Commonwealth benefit from the rapid diagnosis and control of diseases that can be transmitted to humans such as E. coli, Salmonellosis, Brucellosis and Campylobacteriosis. In cooperation with the Department of Consolidated Laboratory Services (the human health counterpart to the RAHLS), the RAHLS facilitates the diagnosis of rabies by removing heads from suspect animals.
    • Animal Regulatory Program Testing Services: The VDACS RAHLS also provides regulatory testing (brucellosis, Swine Pseudorabies, Johne’s disease, Equine infectious anemia, etc.) so that producers can comply with state, federal and international requirements for sale or movement of animals and animal products. These tests perform an important surveillance function in the control of economically significant animal diseases and public health threats such as Exotic Newcastle Disease, Avian Influenza, West Nile virus, Bovine Tuberculosis, brucellosis and pseudorabies. Because of increased trade requirements, these tests are becoming more important, and more varied (e.g. the establishment of a Johne’s control program).
    • Food Safety Testing Services: Regulatory testing is performed in support of the program in the Office of Dairy & Foods that permits interstate shipment of milk produced in Virginia and assures an unadulterated milk supply. Testing services are provided for the Office of Meat & Poultry Services generic E. coli standard, required in state inspected processing plants. Additional testing services are performed for the Office of Food Safety & Security and the Office of Meat & Poultry Services to certify water supplies. Because of current heightened concerns, food safety testing work is increasing in type and volume.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
    Base Budget $2,200,493 $1,409,053    $2,200,493 $1,409,053
    Change To Base -$39,543 $0    -$39,543 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $2,160,950  $1,409,053     $2,160,950  $1,409,053 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Protect and enhance the economic viability of Virginia's animal agriculture industries by provided accurate, timely and accountable testing services for diseases of economic and public health significance.
    Objective Description
    The mission of the VDACS Animal Health Laboratory System to provide quality diagnostic and regulatory testing of specimens from animals, raw foods and limited environmental origin to the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia in a timely manner and at reasonable cost. These testing services provide assistance to producers, regulatory offices, and private veterinarians in diagnosing disease problems, are a vital link in the monitoring and surveillance for both animal and human diseases of regulatory concern (e.g. Brucellosis, Tuberculosis, Salmonella, E. coli) and provide certification of animals and their products necessary for interstate and international export.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Provide services that prevent or minimize the impact of emergency agricultural infestations, animal disease outbreaks, foodborne illness outbreaks, and natural and manmade disasters.
      Comment: Aligns with long term objective # 7 – Protects the public’s safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
    Objective Strategies
    • Operate the five Regional Animal Health Laboratories.
    • Aid in the prevention and control of livestock and poultry diseases for Virginia’s animal industries by adding at least one new testing service per year through June 30, 2012.
    • Aid in the prevention and control of livestock and poultry diseases for Virginia's animal industries by meeting requirements and applying for accreditation by the American Association of Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) by June 30, 2012.
    • Continue the implementation of a state-wide Quality Control Program for the regional animal health laboratory system in accordance with the AAVLD's Essential Requirements for an Accredited Laboratory Guidelines by completing level III documents (individuals laboratory standard operating procedures) through June 30, 2012.
    • Work with vendors to integrate the Office of Laboratory Services Veterinary Laboratory Information Management System with at least two existing automated testing methods through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Test turnaround time.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      4.8
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Average turnaround time in FY09 was 4.8 days.

      Measure Target Value:
      4.8
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Test turnaround time will be 4.8 days or less for each year of the biennium.

      Data Source and Calculation: Test data taken from the OLS laboratory information management system (LIMS), which records, stores and tabulates all laboratory submission data.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 4 of 26
Animal Welfare (301 531 04)
Description

Products and services include:
-A statewide program that promotes the proper care, husbandry and treatment of animals in Virginia;
-Conducts unannounced inspections of the 109 municipal pound and 37 private shelter facilities in the Commonwealth; and
-Provides information and professional assistance on a statewide basis to diverse animal interest groups (e.g. agriculture industries, companion animal industries, wildlife and humane interest groups, etc.).
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Ensure the humane treatment and care of all animals, including those in pounds and shelters, throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia, which aligns with the mission of providing agricultural and consumer protection services.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Title 3.2, Chapter 65 of the Comprehensive Animal Care Laws.

    §3.2-6546 authorizes the State Veterinarian to inspect animal shelters, pounds, boarding establishments, kennels, pet shops, dealers, exhibitors, or groomers to provide proper care and protection of animals.

    §3.2-6556 mandates the State Veterinarian approve training for basic training for animal control officers and continuing education.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock Dealers 230 300
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock markets 29 35
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Cattle 25,200 26,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Equine 41,000 45,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Goats 3,934 4,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Poultry 5,283 6,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Sheep 1,800 2,000
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock producers - Swine 800 900
Pounds, shelters and local animal control agencies Municipal pounds and private shelter entities 146 160
Veterinary practitioners and clinics Veterinary practices 913 950
Veterinary practitioners and clinics Veterinary practitioners 2,482 2,600

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
None.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    -Changing personnel in management positions.
    -Changing status of animal pounds/shelters related to construction of new facilities, merging of animal facilities of local governing bodies, and complex contractual relationships between animal control entities.
    -Considerable volume of animal cruelty and welfare complaints and requests for records under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    -Agency developing a system to record training history of Animal Control Officers.
    -Agency advising the Virginia Department of Emergency Management on suitability of pet friendly emergency shelter facilities.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Customer assistance: provide information to livestock markets on animal welfare and humane handling; provide information for local governing bodies regarding the Comprehensive Animal Care Laws and animal welfare; assist Animal Control Officers in investigations and offer technical advice regarding animal care; consult individuals with complaints relating to animal care and welfare laws; provide technical expertise to entities that train/certify Animal Control Officers.
    • Inspection and enforcement: inspect livestock markets to ensure compliance with animal welfare laws; inspect animal pounds and shelters annually; maintain training records for Animal Control Officers; review plans for animal pound and shelter facilities; assist local Animal Control Officers with their investigations of complaints of animal care and/or cruelty; develop new training standards for Animal Control Officers and approve basic and continuing education courses for Animal Control Officers; establish approved methods and chemicals for humane euthanasia of animals; establish approved methods and chemicals for immobilization of animals.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
    Base Budget $184,954 $0    $184,954 $0
    Change To Base -$2,363 $0    -$2,363 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $182,591  $0     $182,591  $0 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Strengthen compliance with Virginia’s Comprehensive Animal Laws, prevent cruelty to animals and promote humane care and treatment of animals.
    Objective Description
    Strengthen compliance with Virginia’s Comprehensive Animal Care Laws, prevent cruelty to animals and promote humane care and treatment of animals by conducting at least one inspection of each of the 146 animal pound and shelter facilities, monitor Animal Control Officer training standards and provide local jurisdictions assistance in investigations concerning commercial dog breeding and animal fighting. Inspections conducted by one staff member serving as the pound/shelter inspector allows inspections to be conducted in a timely fashion without interruption. Training standards improve education of Animal Control Officers and thereby enhances capabilities to efficiently enforce animal laws for the welfare of Virginia’s animal populations. Provision of veterinary technical services to local law enforcement enhances prosecution of animal fighters and violators of commercial breeder statutes.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Provide agricultural and consumer protection services that support economic growth, meet consumer needs, and encourage environmental stewardship.
      Comment: Aligns with long term objective # 7 – Protects the public’s safety and security, ensuring a fair and effective system of justice and providing a prepared response to emergencies and disasters of all kinds.
    Objective Strategies
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will, upon request, provide technical advice and expertise to Animal Control Officers, Law Enforcement Officers, Commonwealth’s Attorneys, and localities to support the enforcement of the Comprehensive Animal Laws through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will employ an inspector to conduct pound and shelter inspections, will monitor remediation of deficiencies, and will enforce compliance with Virginia’s Comprehensive Animal Laws and regulations by working with local officials and by assessing civil penalties when appropriate through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will cooperate with criminal justice academies and other training entities in the Commonwealth to approve training for Animal Control Officers through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will provide localities with guidance on and offer euthanasia certification classes to Animal Control Officers through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will work closely with the localities to ensure data entry of dangerous dogs into the Virginia Dangerous Dog Registry through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will revise and publish in the Virginia Register of Regulations, the Pound and Shelter Civil Penalty Matrix that will be used by the State Veterinarian to assess civil penalties for violations of the Comprehensive Animal Laws through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Services will communicate with federal, state and local officials to facilitate enforcement of state and federal commercial breeder laws and regulations through June 30, 2012.
    • The Office of Veterinary Service will employ a licensed veterinarian with technical expertise concerning animal fighting and companion animal care to provide technical assistance to local jurisdictions through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of pound and shelters inspected.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: 100% of pounds and shelters inspected in FY 09

      Measure Target Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Maintain at 100% the inspection rate of pounds and shelters

      Data Source and Calculation: Pound and shelter inspection reports.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 5 of 26
Grading and Certification of Virginia Products (301 532 01)
Description

This activity provides a grading system that identifies product quality and condition, which is essential for effective and efficient marketing to occur. This program uniformly applies grade standards and specifications of quality that are accepted, understood and utilized by both buyers and sellers worldwide. The agency operates under agreements with the United States Department of Agriculture to provide commodity grading, inspection and official certification services; Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Auditing and Country of Origin retail surveillance. In addition, this activity is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Virginia Controlled Atmosphere Storage Law for apples and the Virginia Seed Potato Law.

The major service is inspection and official certification of product quality, according to USDA or Virginia grade standards, of fresh fruits, vegetables, peanuts, processed fruits and vegetables, grain, poultry, eggs, livestock, and other miscellaneous commodities for producers, shippers, processors, buyers, marketers, and other financially interested parties who request and pay for the service when needed. Other services include providing the official documentation required for export and official documentation required in settling claims or in legal proceedings.

Along with buyers and sellers who request grading services, all Virginia agriculture stands to benefit from the agency offering these services because industry constantly assesses the added value of graded versus non-graded products. Prices of non-graded products benefit from market value established by graded products. Commodity industries that support and request these voluntary services are aware of the importance of and the need to continue the services as a basis for fair and equitable payments. Trust in the agency's grading allows buyers to make bids through electronic auctions or otherwise buy without the necessity to travel to see the commodity. This attracts more buyers for more competitive bidding. Grading provides an incentive to produce higher quality products.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with VDACS’ mission to promote economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture by enhancing the profitability of Virginia food, agricultural and forest products enterprises.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Mandates in the Code of Virginia:
    Sale of Farm Produce, In General, §§3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708; Virginia Seed Potato Inspection Law and Seed Potato Board, §§3.2-4100 through 3.2-4111; Controlled Atmosphere Storage of Apples and Peaches, §§3.2-4600 through 3.2-4617; Apple Grading, Packing and Marking, §§3.2-4500 through 3.2-4506.

    The following statutes in the Code of Virginia authorize this Agency to establish and promulgate grades and other marketing requirements to promote, protect and develop the agricultural interests of the Commonwealth;
    Certification of Agricultural Products in General, §§3.2-3400A through 3.2-3402; Grades, Marks and Brands Generally, General Provisions, §§3.2-4300 through 3.2-4311.

    The following federal statutes and agreements authorize VDACS to offer grading and inspection programs using USDA grades. This arrangement makes these services more widely available to growers, shippers, receivers, distributors, and processors in Virginia than would otherwise be possible without the cooperation of this state agency.
    Agricultural Marketing Act, 7USC 1621; Agricultural Cooperative Agreements with USDA: Fruit & Vegetable - 12-25-A-15, Poultry & Egg - 12-25-A-3317, Livestock Grading - 12-25-A-2132, Processed Foods – 12-25-A-2087, Grain Delegation - 7-USC-71, Grain Designation of Authority – FGIS-942, Laboratory Testing Services – 12-25-A-3248, Country of Origin Labeling - 12-25-A-5091.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Export Shipping Agents Export Shipping Agents 10 10
Food Manufacturers, Warehouses & Processing Plants Fruit Packers 100 100
Grain Dealers, Handlers and Grain/Soybean Export Facility Grain Dealers 115 115
Grain Dealers, Handlers and Grain/Soybean Export Facility Grain Handlers 140 140
Grain Dealers, Handlers and Grain/Soybean Export Facility Grain/Soybean Export Facility 1 1
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Livestock Auction Markets 27 27
Peanut Processing, Storage & Buying Stations Peanut Blanchers and Storages 9 9
Peanut Processing, Storage & Buying Stations Peanut Buying Stations 30 30
Peanut Processing, Storage & Buying Stations Peanut Mills (Houses) 4 4
Potato & Vegetable Packinghouses Potato & Vegetable Packinghouses 17 17
Food Manufacturers, Warehouses & Processing Plants Poultry Plants 6 8
Food Manufacturers, Warehouses & Processing Plants Produce Warehouses 39 39
Food Manufacturers, Warehouses & Processing Plants Shell Egg Plants 1 3
Virginia farmers Virginia farmers 25,000 47,383

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
Demand for grading service, while current levels are being maintained, will continue to fluctuate depending on many factors:

-Companies choosing to market products without a quality shield/official grade
-Number of producers and processors
-Volume of products
-Disease and weather factors
-Producer or processor unable to afford grading services

Without increased General Fund support, commodity grading programs will find it necessary to continue to augment fees to meet rising costs.

Producers view increasing grading fees as inhibiting the competitiveness of Virginia producers and making them non-competitive with producers in states that supplement grading fees with state funds.

A reduction in the use of grading services by small producers could be realized due to their inability to afford fees charged for services.
Partners
Partner Description
USDA United States Department of Agriculture
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    None.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    Despite decline in the total number of farms in Virginia, the Commodity Grading Programs need to continue to develop Certification Services that are more customized to meet the specific product needs of producers, food manufacturers, the food service industry, and food retailers, with the consumer demanding new and a wider variety of grade and quality certifications.

    Some of the new programs already on the horizon included certification for the following:
    •Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) - continued expansion
    •Country of origin labeling (COOL) - continued expansion
    •Identity Preservation/Verification Program
    •Food Security
    •Humane handling

    These new services will result in growing demand from both large and small producers as grocery chains and eventually consumers will demand these certifications before they purchase.

    In grain, a new trend of shipping grain and soybean products in ocean-going containers, which Virginia has a great excess supply of, has begun revolutionizing grain shipments and has created an extensive new challenge for supplying services to this key sector of Virginia’s agricultural economy.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Inspection and official certification of product quality, according to USDA or Virginia grade standards, of the following: fresh fruits, vegetables, peanuts, processed fruits and vegetables, grain, poultry, eggs, livestock, and other miscellaneous commodities.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
    Base Budget $337,215 $5,385,980    $337,215 $5,385,980
    Change To Base -$29,761 $0    -$29,761 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $307,454  $5,385,980     $307,454  $5,385,980 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Increase the value of Virginia agricultural and forestry products marketed with assistance and collaboration from VDACS (Division of Marketing).
    Objective Description
    Effective marketing programs will maintain and expand current markets for Virginia food, agricultural and forestry products. By monitoring a consistent measure of the annual value of food, agricultural and forestry products; this value should increase due to expanded volume or enhanced increased value of Virginia products.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.
      Comment: By maintaining and enhancing the profitability of Virginia food, agricultural and forest products producers, this will contribute to a solid and growing agricultural economy in Virginia. This aligns with the long term objective to be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
    Objective Strategies
    • Meet clients’ requests for services by maintaining management and certified technical staff in five comprehensive commodity inspection programs through June 30, 2012. (Poultry and Egg, Grain, Fruit and Vegetable, Peanut and Livestock).
    • For each graded commodity, conduct an annual review of current fee structures to analyze both the fiscal health of commodity grading programs as well as the impact of current fees on the competitiveness of the graded commodities.
    • Provide GAP/GHP (Good Agricultural Practices/Good Handling Practices) information and training, relating to the USDA audit matrix, to Virginia’s fruit and vegetable industry through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide continued education to producers, 4-H, and FFA members regarding USDA quality grades and their relationship to market and industry trends and demands through June 30, 2012.
    • Annually assist in the development of exhibit material and participate in industry trade shows, conferences and field days through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Economic value of products inspected, graded and certified by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up
      Measure Baseline Value:
      2.09
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Five year rolling average is currently $2.09 Billion.

      Measure Target Value:
      2.17
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Two percent increase each year from the five year average.

      Data Source and Calculation: Commodity Service inspection reports



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 6 of 26
Milk Marketing Regulation (301 532 04)
Description

This service area creates and administers regulations that foster an orderly state milk-marketing environment to provide for a constantly available supply of milk production dedicated to fluid milk product for use by citizens in controlled markets.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with VDACS mission of providing marketing and consumer protection through the provision of a constantly available source of a healthy and wholesome food source sufficient to satisfy the demands of the citizens of the Commonwealth.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    Chapter 32 of Title 3.2 establishes the State Milk Commission and provides for its composition and authority.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Agribusinesses, Ag Cooperatives and Membership Organizations Cooperative Associations representing licensed producers 7 7
Licensed processors, distributors and producers Licensed processors and distributors 179 180
Livestock producers, dealers, markets Licensed producers 1,109 1,065

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
The number of licensed dairy producers will continue to decline in future years. Dairy producers continue to go out of business due to retirements, conversions of farmland to other uses through urban sprawl, and an inability to produce milk in a profitable manner. In the last ten years there has been a 4.13% decrease in the number of licensed producers. Despite producer losses milk production is expected to continue in quantities adequate to meet demand.

The number of cooperative associations will continue at approximately the same level.

The number of licensed processors and distributors will remain approximately the same with a direction of modest increases anticipated. In the last ten years there has been a 28.15% increase in licensees. However, this trend has slowed in the last few years. The number of licensees directly impacts the population that is monitored through reporting, auditing and investigations.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    The number of dairy producers continues to decline annually placing stress on the availability of raw milk production to meet consumer demand. Declining milk production in the Southeast places stress on the Northeast and upper Midwest producers to supply milk production to processors in that region. Virginia is a net exporting state and the Southeast is the primary region that receives those exports.

    The continued increase in specialty fluid milk products results in the need to license processors and their distributor customers who market these products in Virginia controlled markets.

    The availability of individuals with the technical knowledge of the dairy industry business practices, pricing of dairy production and utilization, and accounting principles is declining rapidly. With anticipated retirements successful recruitment of staff will be difficult. Extensive and costly training will be required of new employees.

    The current national dairy marketing structure and environment, as well as that in Virginia, is experiencing rapid and dynamic changes through both vertical and horizontal integration. These changes place stress on the ability of the Milk Commission to ensure that an effective regulatory structure is in place to supervise and control all aspects of the production, processing and marketing of milk.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    None.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Establish and manage an annual milk production supply system that meets the need of fluid milk product demand of citizens in controlled markets.
    • Establish and announce advanced monthly producer prices for delivered milk production. A monthly price for non-fluid milk products is also established and announced.
    • Review, audit and apply established milk accounting standards to licensed distributors monthly reports of receipts and utilization to calculate and communicate producer delivery values.
    • Review, analyze and audit distributors monthly reports from distributor records to ascertain correctness and the need for adjustments. Examine licensee records and business practices for compliance to regulations.
    • Investigate all complaints regarding compliance to regulations.
    • License all processors, distributors, producer-distributors, and retailers marketing fluid milk products into Virginia controlled markets.
    • License producers who will produce and deliver raw milk to licensed processors supplying fluid milk products into Virginia controlled markets. Account for licensed producer’s production.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
    Base Budget $0 $755,801    $0 $755,801
    Change To Base $0 $0    $0 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $0  $755,801     $0  $755,801 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Maintain a system that supports an orderly state milk market to promote the production of a supply of competitively priced fluid milk that satisfies Virginia consumer demand.
    Objective Description
    The provision of an adequate and constant supply of fluid milk products, a vital and healthy food source, to the citizens of the Commonwealth promotes public welfare and health.
    Objective Strategies
    • Enhance staff skill levels through formal and in-house training which support and maintain the Commission’s operational activities that provide for an orderly milk market.
    • Increase the efficiency of informational flow between customers and the Commission by encouraging the use of technology.
    • Provide continuous assistance and training to customers on regulatory requirements to improve compliance.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of available fluid milk processor audits completed
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: In FY 09 100% of available fluid milk processor audits were completed

      Measure Target Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Maintain completed fluid milk processor audits at 100%

      Data Source and Calculation: This measure is calculated from information derived from monthly audit tracking reports and the annual log of compelted audits.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 7 of 26
Marketing Research (301 532 05)
Description

Marketing Research includes the Virginia Market News and the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Services.

Virginia Market News Service collects and disseminates daily market prices and analyses to Virginia agricultural producers, processors, handlers, general agribusinesses, agriculture financial community, print and broadcast media, marketers, commercial market news services, consumers and USDA. These unbiased, third party reports assist each business and individual in making accurate, reliable sales and purchasing decisions. Virginia Market News Service operates under a cooperative agreement with USDA AMS Market News.

Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service issues official state forecasts and estimates of crops, livestock, poultry, dairy, prices, labor and other related items in cooperation with the USDA-National Statistics Service. This cooperative series of reports helps maintain an orderly association among the outputs, supply, and marketing sectors in Virginia’s agricultural community. The Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service is a joint cooperative federal and state program.

With the highly competitive global food and forest products arena, consistent market research and reporting is critical to better anticipate market shifts, enhance market segmentation from competitors, and position Virginia sources as preferred suppliers.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    Enhance opportunities for the growth and profitability of the Virginia agriculture industry
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    §§ 3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708 mandates the marketing services of the Division of Marketing, which include all components of this activity.
    The component, Marketing Research and Marketing Services, implements the Federal/State Cooperative Agreement Number 12-25-A-4664.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
General Public Print and broadcast media 130 130
Virginia farmers Virginia farmers 25,000 47,383

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
According to the USDA Census of Agriculture, the total number of farms in Virginia and the United States continues to decline. However, the number of small farms and the number of large farms increased in Virginia and this trend is projected to continue. This will result in growing demand to tailor programs and services for both large and small producer, high volume and high value producer, and direct and international marketer.

In 2008-2009, Market News tailored e-mail subscriptions for 75 print media receiving nearly 1,010 reports weekly. Automated MP3 audio files were sent daily to 55 rural market broadcast outlets by staff using new computer software.

Customer numbers will continue to be driven by the total number of farmers in Virginia – 47,383.

Total web hits for Market News information averaged 82,250 per month.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    None.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    Anticipated changes include staying updated with the variety of delivery mechanisms required to reach customers and clients, and the ever-changing nature of Virginia agriculture both in terms of products and customer needs. Greater diversification of Virginia agriculture both in terms of customers and clients enhances the need for more customized market research services.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Collect daily information on Virginia prices of agricultural commodities.
    • Publish unbiased, third party reports and analyses that assist agricultural producers.
    • Assess current and future markets for Virginia products.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
    Base Budget $456,111 $20,000    $456,111 $20,000
    Change To Base -$6,953 $0    -$6,953 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $449,158  $20,000     $449,158  $20,000 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Enhance the viability of Virginia agriculture by maintaining consistent market news programs to obtain current price information and market trends.
    Objective Description
    Reporting on current market trends and prices and anticipating future market shifts is critical to the survival of Virginia agriculture in the future. Competition for market share comes from around the corner and around the world and producers must have unbiased, reliable information and market analysis to position their enterprises for both the near and longer terms.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.
      Comment: This objective aligns with the overall objectives to promote the economic development of Virginia agriculture and forestry. This aligns with the long term objective to be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
    Objective Strategies
    • Collect, analyze, and disseminate marketing information on livestock, grain, poultry, fruit, vegetables, peanuts, cotton, oilseeds, hay using network reporting systems, internet and broadcast media through June 30, 2012.
    • Conduct surveys using statistically defensible methods to obtain information needed by commodity groups and specialists through June 30, 2012.
    • Maintain USDA certification and training of Livestock staff to collect and analyze livestock market information through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Percentage of completed responses to industry and media requests.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: In FY 2009, Market News responded to 100% of the requests for market information from the media and industry.

      Measure Target Value:
      100
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Maintain FY 2009 baseline.

      Data Source and Calculation: Number of customers subscribing to reports of their choice via fax, mail, E-mail or by calling a toll-free number, distribution of Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service annual report.



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 8 of 26
Market Virginia Agricultural and Forestry Products Nationally and Internationally (301 532 06)
Description

This service area locates, develops, maintains and expands local, regional and global markets for Virginia food, agricultural and forest products. Functions within the service area are separated between domestic, international and livestock marketing.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with VDACS’ mission to promote economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture by enhancing the profitability of Virginia food, agricultural and forest products enterprises.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    The following citations are from the Code of Virginia:

    §§ 3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708 mandates the marketing services of the Division of Marketing, which include all components of this activity.

    § 3.2-106 mandates the Equine Breeder Incentive Program.

    §§3.2-3500 through 3.2-3502 mandates the Farmers’ Market System.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
State & Local Governments Commodity Boards 16 16
Direct Marketers Direct Marketers 700 1,700
Nursery Dealers (Retailers) and Nursery Growers (Wholesalers) Nurseries 400 800
Processed Food Companies Processed Food Companies 200 600
Retail Food Stores, Markets, Shops & Mobile Units Retail Farmers Markets 120 175
Vineyards Vineyards 100 200
Virginia farmers Virginia farmers 25,000 47,383

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
According to the USDA Census of Agriculture, the number of small farms and the number of large farms have increased in Virginia and this trend is projected to continue. This will result in growing demand to tailor programs and services for both large and small producer, high volume and high value producer, and direct and international marketers.

Consumer preferences change continually but major trends include:

-Low-cost food providers have carved out a substantial portion of the marketplace which create large, but extremely competitive/low margin markets for producers
-Greater identification with locally produced products which creates new marketing niches for innovative producers, however, niche markets fill fast
-Organic products consumption is rising dramatically
-Consumers are more health conscious and increasingly concerned over how foods are produced, not just if they are available
-Increased consumer preference for value added products
-Increased product source identity throughout the food chain
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    None.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    None.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Sales and Marketing services assist agricultural and forest products producers, food processors, and industry organizations by initiating sales leads (throughout the Eastern U.S. and Canada) and production area tours, developing new markets and packaging requirements, completing market analysis, participating and representing agricultural industries during trade shows, implementing retail and consumer promotions, distributing marketing information during presentations, providing administrative support to Commodity Boards, assisting with organic certification procedures, and assisting the Departments of Health and Aging with their agricultural related consumer oriented grants. Activities cover conventional and organically produced products. Virginia Farmers Market System services small to medium size produce growers with state-owned shipping point market facilities for four state regions. Each market facility provides produce growers with a central point for delivery of recently harvested product, which is co-mingled, graded, packed and cooled to meet retail grocery and institutional buyer specifications.
    • Livestock Marketing Services provides a complete and integrated marketing program for the livestock industry. These services include a comprehensive market development and promotion program, market information and analysis, and official quality grade evaluation of live animals.
    • International Marketing service assists Virginia exporters in marketing their products overseas by organizing foreign trade missions, hosting buyer missions, participating in trade shows and by monitoring trade policy issues. Through offices in Richmond, and Hong Kong, and a network of local consultants in Europe and Latin America, valuable in-country assistance is provided to Virginia exporters.
    • Strategic market research to expand existing markets for existing products; find or create new markets for existing products. Agriculture Product Promotion Services includes advertising, trade show management, literature development, consumer and retail promotions.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
    Base Budget $3,061,508 $199,500    $3,061,508 $199,500
    Change To Base -$82,605 $400,000    -$82,605 $400,000
               
    Service Area Total   $2,978,903  $599,500     $2,978,903  $599,500 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Increase the value of Virginia food, agricultural and forestry products in the domestic and international marketplace through marketing services provided to producers and processors.
    Objective Description
    Effective marketing programs will maintain and expand current markets for Virginia food, agricultural and forestry products. By monitoring a consistent measure of the annual value of food, agricultural and forestry products; this value should increase due to expanded volume or enhanced increased value of Virginia products.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.
      Comment: This aligns with the long term objective to be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy, and secondarily inspires and supports Virginians toward healthy lives through increasing the supply and recognition of fresh, local, top quality food and beverage products.
    Objective Strategies
    • Monitor, search and apply for additional grant funding primarily through USDA programs, e.g. Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program, Specialty Crop Block Grant, Risk Management Agency, Foreign Agricultural Service Cooperators, and others as announced through June 30, 2012.
    • Develop, submit and implement projects for USDA’s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program as notifications are published through June 30, 2012.
    • Continue to expand and enhance the VDACS Marketing website to draw more traffic and offer a more user-friendly format for all clients through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide oversight on the policy and operation of shipping point markets in the Virginia Farmers' Market System through June 30, 2012.
    • Monitor federal and private sources of business risk management programs and expertise that are available to Virginia agricultural producers. Ensure that VDACS staff is conversant in these programs and communicates their availability through June 30, 2012.
    • Continue and strengthen cooperation with Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the Farm Service Agency/Virginia to expand the array and outreach of risk management education programs through June 30, 2012.
    • Enhance profitability of food products manufactured in Virginia by providing Export Letters and letters of free sale upon request for vendors in substantial compliance with the Virginia Food Laws who desire to market food products both domestically and internationally through June 30, 2012.
    • Create and implement market development strategies for longer- term emerging international markets. Activities will include hosting at least three reverse trade missions from these markets, generating new export sales by June 30, 2012. Market development efforts will also include participation in at least three trade shows in emerging markets during the same time period.
    • Maintain a strong presence in mature international markets, such as Europe and Canada, in order to expand market share of Virginia products through June 30, 2012. Activities will include events to expand buyer contacts, such as reverse trade missions and trade show participation.
    • Create and implement market development strategies that will increase usage of locally-produced farm products by restaurants to include tours for restaurant owners and chefs by June 30, 2012.
    • Expand marketing activities into the Northern Virginia market to include active participation in at least two local chef’s associations, participating in one major trade show, and increasing consumer oriented advertising at major farmer’s markets and food retailers by June 30, 2012.
    • Promote the commercialization and marketability of new agricultural products and processes through the Specialty Agriculture Research Grants Program.
    • Expand and enhance the growth and development of Virginia’s agritourism enterprises and initiatives through workshops, conferences, and one-on-one counseling by June 30, 2012.
    • Expand and enhance the growth and development of retail farmers markets in Virginia to include developing a manual for starting a farmers market and conducting a survey to develop a profile of the markets and their economic impact by June 30, 2012.
    • Increase producer exposure to alternative marketing options including direct marketing, organics and farmers markets that have the potential of enhancing farm viability through June 30, 2012.
    • Increase awareness of the quality and diversity of Virginia agricultural products through promotional activities, publicity, tradeshow participation and special events through June 30, 2012. This will include participating in consumer-related events under the Virginia Grown and Virginia’s Finest umbrella.
    • Continue and expand promotion of the “Virginia’s Finest” trademark to include oriented regional advertising campaigns involving newspapers, magazines, TV and Internet by June 30, 2012.
    • Continue and expand the “Virginia Grown” program to increase awareness among consumers of locally produced farm products by initiating TV, radio, newspaper and magazine advertising as well as implementing promotional activities with major food retailers by June 30, 2012.
    • Conduct trade calls and production area tours with prospective buyers, wholesalers, brokers and grocery chains, as well as respond to requests for marketing assistance from Virginia producers of food, agricultural and forestry products through June 30, 2012.
    • Conduct trade calls and production area tours with prospective buyers, wholesalers, brokers and grocery chains, as well as respond to requests for marketing assistance from Virginia producers of food, agricultural and forestry products through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide continued assistance and management of the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association Beautiful Gardens(TM) plant introduction program for the purpose of providing Virginia producers with increased opportunities for the production and sale of plants grown in Virginia through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide staff support to the Farm-to- School program enhancing opportunities for Virginia grown and processed foods to be sold through schools and other educational institutions through June 30, 2012.
    • Develop new contacts and maintain current customer contacts with cattle feedlot operators and buyers in Midwestern and Northern states and assure their continued level of participation in Virginia’s special graded feeder cattle livestock auctions through June 30, 2012.
    • Develop new Virginia livestock promotion programs that target regions of the United States that have increased supplies of byproduct feeds due to increased biofuel production through June 30, 2012.
    • Increase small livestock producers’ exposure to and participation in cooperative marketing options by assisting new and existing local livestock marketing groups through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide assistance to state breed associations, cattle producers and groups by targeting and expanding the growth and development of customized feeder cattle sales such as “Breed Influence”, “Natural”, “Health Program”, and “Back Grounded” feeder cattle sales through June 30, 2012.
    • Expand and improve electronic marketing and promotional opportunities for Virginia livestock by utilizing tools such as Tel-O-Auction and the Livestock Clearinghouse electronic marketing newsletter through June 30, 2012.
    • Increase awareness of quality Virginia feeder cattle through the Mid-Atlantic Carcass Educational Seminar, buyer tours, feedlot data dissemination to buyers, trade show participation, and special events, through June 30, 2012.
    • The State Veterinarian will develop a plan to support livestock marketing needs for country-of-origin labeling using state and federal animal identification systems and funding in use and under development for animal health purposes through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Economic value of products inspected, graded and certified, the sales values of marine, nursery, and wine products, as well as export values of all Virginia agricultural and forestry products.
      Measure Class:
      Agency Key
      Measure Type:
      Outcome
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Up
      Measure Baseline Value:
      2.646
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: Five-year rolling average in FY 09 was $2.646 billion.

      Measure Target Value:
      2.75
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Two percent increase each year from the five year average.

      Data Source and Calculation: Commodity service inspection reports



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 9 of 26
Agricultural Commodity Boards (301 532 08)
Description

This service area provides administrative oversight to 16 commodity boards, all of which are supervisory boards that serve the producers of apples, peanuts, Irish potatoes, soybeans, corn, small grains, marine products, wine, pork, eggs, cattle, dark fired tobacco, bright flue-cured tobacco, sheep, horses and cotton. The mission of the boards is to provide short and long term growth for their respective industries through strategic investment in research, marketing and education programs. The supervisory boards were established when each industry requested legislation that enabled a producer referendum on the question of whether to establish the board and collect an assessment to fund the board. Fifteen boards are totally self-supporting through these assessments.

The self-assessment concept of the boards provides funding for market development and/or promotion projects, research and education for the individual commodities. Each board has separate legislation with various limitations on assessment fund expenditures.

The sixteenth board, the Virginia Wine Board, operates on General Fund Appropriations linked to the liter tax on wine. Funds expended by the Wine Board are used for wine marketing, education, as well as enology and viticulture research.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    This service area directly aligns with VDACS’ mission to promote the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture by enhancing the profitability of Virginia food, agricultural and forest products enterprises.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    This activity is governed by mandates in the Code of Virginia, in the following sections:

    §§ 3.2-4700 through 3.2-4708 mandates the marketing services of the Division of Marketing, which include the marketing programs conducted through the commodity boards.

    § 3.2-1100 mandates limitations on the diversion of dedicated funds for the Boards.

    Each of the sixteen commodity boards is mandated by a separate law, but each has the same purposes, which are market development and/or promotion, research and education. Additionally, the Virginia Sheep Board mandate includes predator control. The specific sections of the Code of Virginia are:

    §§ 3.2-1700 through 3.2-1722, the Virginia Horse Industry Board Act;
    §§ 3.2-2500 through 3.2-2510, the Virginia Dark Fired Tobacco Board;
    §§ 3.2-2400 through 3.2-2411, the Virginia Bright Flue-Cured Tobacco Board;
    §§ 3.2-1200 through 3.2-1217, the Virginia Apple Board;
    §§ 3.2-1900 through 3.2-1910, the Virginia Peanut Board;
    §§ 3.2-2300 through 3.2-2314, the Virginia Soybean Board;
    §§ 3.2-1800 through 3.2-1815, the Irish Potato Board;
    §§ 3.2-2200 through 3.2-2214, the Virginia Small Grains Board;
    §§ 3.2-2700 through 3.2-2704D, the Virginia Marine Products Board;
    §§ 3.2-2000 through 3.2-2009, the Virginia Pork Industry Board;
    §§ 3.2-1601 through 3.2-1610, the Virginia Egg Board;
    §§ 3.2-1300 through 3.2-1103, the Virginia Cattle Industry Board;
    §§ 3.2-1400 through 3.2-1414, the Virginia Corn Board;
    §§ 3.2-3000 through 3.2-3006, the Virginia Wine Board;
    §§ 3.2-2100 through 3.2-2114, the Virginia Sheep Industry Board;
    §§ 3.2-1500 through 3.2-1514, the Virginia Cotton Board.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
State & Local Governments Commodity Boards 16 16
Virginia farmers Virginia farmers 47,383 47,383

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
No changes anticipated in the total number of 16 commodity boards in the near term:

National commodity board legislation has recently withstood a challenge in the Supreme Court, therefore it is expected that commodity boards will continue and strengthen. In Virginia, as production of some commodities (e.g. tobacco and peanuts) decreases, income derived from self-assessment programs will decline. Boards will be faced in the near term with decisions to either increase assessments, reduce funding to/or eliminating programs or cease to operate.

The establishment of any new commodity boards appears unlikely to occur in the near future, however legislation to create new or increased assessments is highly likely.

Expanding the integration of the research, marketing and education functions of these boards with other commodities and national and international marketing efforts will be critical to the overall efficacy of individual board initiatives.
Partners
Partner Description
[None entered]
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    None.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    With reduced funding caused by decreased commodity production in some sectors, commodity boards will have to re-prioritize program initiatives in order to continue effectiveness. Boards will have to reconsider state contributions to national commodity program efforts versus continuing in-state programs.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Marketing/market development activities: product placement, sales calls/leads, special event planning and execution, sales seminar planning and execution, national and international trade show participation, special promotions planning and execution, media, public and customer relations, promotional brochure/directory development and distribution, and industry and producer relations efforts and events.
    • Research: commodity production improvement techniques, disease eradication, value-added product development, commodity transportation and handling, market research (manufacturing industry and consumer use/trends/preferences).
    • Education: producer, first handlers, wholesalers, distributors and consumers.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
    Base Budget $765,949 $3,598,078    $765,949 $3,598,078
    Change To Base -$445 $0    -$445 $0
               
    Service Area Total   $765,504  $3,598,078     $765,504  $3,598,078 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)    
    Wage    
    Contract Employees    
    Total Human Resource Level 0.0   = Current Employment Level + Wage and Contract Employees
  • Factors Impacting HR
    [Nothing entered]
  • Anticipated HR Changes
    [Nothing entered]
Service Area Objectives
 
  • Improve the operations of individual commodity boards and expand integrated, multi-commodity marketing promotions.
    Objective Description
    Assist commodity industry producers in seeking methods to better manage operations and risks, and ensure compliance with state regulations. Coordinate, integrate and target state and national commodity board programs in order to strengthen commodity marketing, research and education successes.
    Alignment to Agency Goals
    • Agency Goal: Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry.
      Comment: This aligns with the long term objective to be a national leader in the preservation and enhancement of our economy.
    Objective Strategies
    • Maintain and enhance working relationships with Virginia commodity boards to include multi-commodity promotions through June 30, 2012.
    • Provide marketing and administrative support to 16 agricultural commodity boards to assist in accomplishing their programs, promotion, education and research through June 30, 2012.
    Link to State Strategy
    • nothing linked
    Objective Measures
    • Number of integrated commodity promotion and programming opportunities and events each fiscal year.
      Measure Class:
      Other
      Measure Type:
      Output
      Measure Frequency:
      Annual
      Preferred Trend:
      Maintain
      Measure Baseline Value:
      2
      Date:
      6/30/2009

      Measure Baseline Description: One ongoing, multi-commodity activity in FY09.

      Measure Target Value:
      2
      Date:
      6/30/2012

      Measure Target Description: Two multi-commodity activities each year of the biennium.

      Data Source and Calculation: Commodity board projects recorded in board minutes



Service Area Strategic Plan
4/18/2014   2:17 pm
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (301)
Biennium:
Service Area 10 of 26
Agribusiness Development Services and Farmland Preservation (301 532 09)
Description

Economic Development of the Agricultural Sector and Preservation of the State’s Agricultural Resources.
Background Information
Mission Alignment and Authority
  • Describe how this service supports the agency mission
    The service area aligns directly with the Agency’s mission to promote economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture, encourage environmental stewardship and provide consumer protection. It also aligns with Goal #1 of the Agency’s Strategic Plan; Enhance opportunities for the growth, profitability and continued viability of the Virginia agriculture industry. Strategies under this goal include agribusiness development, specialty agribusiness, farmland preservation, and farm business transition.
  • Describe the Statutory Authority of this Service
    §3.2-102 (A) charges the Commissioner with general powers and duties to include "…promote, protect and develop the agricultural interests of the Commonwealth; …promote the creation of new agribusiness, including new crops, biotechnology and new uses of agricultural products and the expansion of existing agribusiness".

    §3.2-200 through 3.2-203 establishes the Office of Farmland Preservation and the Virginia Farm Link program, and sets the powers, duties, and reporting requirements of these programs.

    §3.2-2600 through 3.2-2603 defines the Aquaculture Advisory Board including composition and appointment of members, membership terms and meeting requirements and sets the powers and duties of the Commissioner.
Customers
Agency Customer Group Customer Customers served annually Potential annual customers
Agribusinesses, Ag Cooperatives and Membership Organizations Agribusinesses, Ag Cooperatives, agricultural organizations and institutions 1,000 1,000
Virginia farmers Farmers 47,383 47,383
State & Local Governments Local governments, conservation organizations, and agencies 200 200

Anticipated Changes To Agency Customer Base
As nearly 30% of Virginia’s farmers are older than 65 with an average age of 57, the number of traditional agricultural customers will decline. However, because of the increasingly larger scale and capital intensity of agribusinesses and non-traditional specialty agriculture, the number and size of the individual customers served will likely increase resulting in an increased demand for technical business development services. Additionally, given the increased focus on land conservation, the demand for farmland preservation and farm transition services likely will continue to increase.
Partners
Partner Description
Internal Agency Partners
Local and State Economic Developers/Offices
Virginia Agribusiness Council
Virginia Cooperative Extension
Virginia Farm Bureau
Virginia's Land Grant Universities
Products and Services
  • Factors Impacting the Products and/or Services:
    Overall economic conditions for business growth, trade and development.

    Market demand for products, particularly increasing demand for local and sustainable produced products.

    Supply and production level of commodities and agricultural-based products.

    Changing demographics of constituents.

    Discontinuation and modifications of federal government agricultural support programs.

    Financial security and stability of agricultural businesses.

    Changing development pressures on agricultural resource base.
  • Anticipated Changes to the Products and/or Services
    Expanded and increased business development activities in specialized agribusiness including value-added and renewable energy related business ventures.

    Continued interest in farmland preservation policies and programs.

    Increased interest in farm transition activities.

    Reduction in state and local funding for purchase of development rights (PDR) programs.
  • Listing of Products and/or Services
    • Marketing and promotional activities to showcase Virginia as an exceptional site for development of agricultural business so as to support 20 companies in their decisions to locate, expand, or remain in the state each biennium.
    • Target for special development efforts those sectors of Virginia agriculture, which show the best prospects for investment and employment growth over the next biennium.
    • Target the tobacco producing areas as a priority for agribusiness development initiatives through the referral of three leads over the next biennium.
    • Target two specific commodity based sectors, which are competitively challenged, as a priority for value-added or high-value added initiatives over the next biennium.
    • Provide technical assistance to localities on infrastructure and site development for agribusiness.
    • Technical assistance in the development and implementation of farmland preservation strategies.
    • Provide funding and support for high value specialty agriculture research and commercialization projects.
    • State matching funds to local Purchase of Development Rights (PDR) programs.
    • Administration of the Virginia Farm Link database.
    • Funding for farm transition workshops focused on building communication among family members, and increasing the professional capacity of farm family service providers.
Finance
  • Financial Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Financial Breakdown
    FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012 FY 2011    FY 2012
      General Fund     Nongeneral Fund        General Fund     Nongeneral Fund  
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
    Base Budget $1,023,265 $0    $1,023,265 $0
    Change To Base -$5,310 $60,000    -$5,310 $60,000
               
    Service Area Total   $1,017,955  $60,000     $1,017,955  $60,000 
Human Resources
  • Human Resources Overview
    [Nothing entered]
  • Human Resource Levels
    Effective Date      
    Total Authorized Position level 0    
    Vacant Positions 0    
    Current Employment Level 0.0    
    Non-Classified (Filled)    
    Full-Time Classified (Filled)    breakout of Current Employment Level
    Part-Time Classified (Filled)    
    Faculty (Filled)